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Links to Britannia/Britain/Brittanica/England/Great Britain/English/Britons/Brittones/British/Britains
List of used abbreviations:
Agr:
Ann:
Aug:
Dbg:
Ger:
Gth:
His:
Hor:
Msp:
NwT:
Ovd:
Plt:
Stn:
Vrg:
Tacitus' Agricola.
Tacitus' Annals.
The Deeds of the Divine Augustus
De Bello Gallico, by Julius Caesar
Tacitus' Germania.
The Goths, by Jordanes.
Histories, by Tacitus.
History of Rome, by Livy.
Mispogon by Julian
New Testament.
Metamorphosis by Ovid.
Parallel lives by Plutarch.
Suetonius 12 Caesars
Virgil Aeneid.
Go to category

links of: Britannia

Stn Domitian, Chapter 10: His cruelty
Stn Galba, Chapter 7: His career
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 47: On gems.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 58: Military genius.
Stn Titus, Chapter 4: Titus as an adult
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 4: In the army

links of: Britain

Agr Chapter 5: In Britain
Agr Chapter 6: Marriage, Quaestor and Praetor
Agr Chapter 8: In Britain again
Agr Chapter 9: In Aquitania
Agr Chapter 10: Geography of Britain
Agr Chapter 11: The Britons
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain
Agr Chapter 13: Claudius' expedition to Britain
Agr Chapter 14: Further problems in Britain
Agr Chapter 16: Further problems in Britain. Boudicea
Agr Chapter 17: Cerealis and Frontinus
Agr Chapter 18: Agricola in Britain
Agr Chapter 20: Agricola in Britain. (cont.)
Agr Chapter 23: Agricola in Britain. In Scotland
Agr Chapter 24: Agricola in Britain. On Ireland
Agr Chapter 27: Agricola in Britain. Scotland (cont.)
Agr Chapter 28: Agricola in Britain. The journey of the Usepii
Agr Chapter 30: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Galcagus
Agr Chapter 31: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Galcagus (cont.)
Agr Chapter 33: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Agricola
Agr Chapter 38: Agricola in Britain. The Romans win. Around England
Agr Chapter 40: Agricola in Britain. Recall of Agricola
Ann Book II Chapter 24: War with the Germans. Disaster at sea.
Ann Book XI Chapter 3: The fall of Valerius Asiaticus (cont.)
Ann Book XII Chapter 31: Problems in Britain
Ann Book XII Chapter 36: Problems in Britain. Caractacus (cont.)
Ann Book XIII Chapter 32: Pomponia Graecina
Ann Book XIV Chapter 29: Further problems in Britain. Mona attacked
Ann Book XIV Chapter 39: Further problems in Britain. Survey of Polyclitus
Ann Book XVI Chapter 15: Death of Anteius and Ostorius (cont.)
Dbg Book II Chapter 4: War with the Belgae. Overview over the Belgae.
Dbg Book II Chapter 14: War with the Belgae. Peace with the Bellovaci.
Dbg Book III Chapter 8: War with the Veneti. Revolt.
Dbg Book III Chapter 9: War with the Veneti. Preparations for war.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 20: Caesar in Britain. Prolog.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 22: Caesar in Britain. The Morini.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 23: Caesar in Britain. Landing problems.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 27: Caesar in Britain. Surrender of the Britains.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 28: Caesar in Britain. The cavalry in storm at sea.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 30: Caesar in Britain. Uprise of the Britains.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 37: Problems with the Morini.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 38: Problems with the Morini. The Morini beaten.
Dbg Book V Chapter 2: Caesar in Britain. Preparations.
Dbg Book V Chapter 4: The Treveri. Indutiomarus gives in.
Dbg Book V Chapter 6: Caesar in Britain. Dumnorix.
Dbg Book V Chapter 8: Caesar in Britain. Landing in Britain.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.
Dbg Book V Chapter 13: Caesar in Britain. Britain, Ireland, Man.
Dbg Book V Chapter 22: Caesar in Britain. Peace with the other tribes.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 13: The Gauls: the Druids.
Dbg Book VII Chapter 76: Caesar and Vercingetorix. The Gaul army is gathered.
Ger Chapter 45: Aestyans, amber and Sitones
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.
His Book I Chapter 2: Introduction (cont.)
His Book I Chapter 6: Galba becomes emperor
His Book I Chapter 9: Galba becomes emperor. Germany, Britain, Illyricum
His Book I Chapter 52: Revolt of Vitellius. Preparations
His Book I Chapter 59: Revolt of Vitellius. Julius Civilis
His Book I Chapter 61: Revolt of Vitellius. March to Italy
His Book II Chapter 11: Otho versus Vitellius
His Book II Chapter 27: Otho versus Vitellius. The Batavian mutiny
His Book II Chapter 32: Otho versus Vitellius. The strategy of Otho (cont.)
His Book II Chapter 37: Otho versus Vitellius. Consultations?
His Book II Chapter 65: Vitellius emperor. Cluvius Rufus
His Book II Chapter 66: Vitellius emperor. The vanquished legions
His Book II Chapter 86: Revolt of Vespasian. Primus Antonius
His Book II Chapter 97: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius summons the army
His Book III Chapter 2: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Preliminary discussions: Antonius Primus' ideas
His Book III Chapter 15: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Primus marches to Cremona
His Book III Chapter 35: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. The beaten Vitellianists are dispersed
His Book III Chapter 44: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Spain and Britain follow Vespasian
His Book III Chapter 70: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Speech of Sabinus
His Book IV Chapter 12: The Batavians
His Book IV Chapter 54: Vespasian emperor. Rumours
His Book IV Chapter 68: The Batavian Uprise. Reaction in Rome
His Book IV Chapter 76: The Batavian Uprise. Conflict of opinions
His Book IV Chapter 79: The Batavian Uprise. Further fights
His Book V Chapter 16: The Batavian Uprise. Preparation for battle
Plt Caesar Chapter 16: The loyalty of his soldiers
Plt Caesar Chapter 23: Caesar's war with the Germans and in Britain
Stn Caligula, Chapter 19: The bridge over the Baian gulf
Stn Claudius, Chapter 17: Claudius' expedition to Britain
Stn Nero, Chapter 18: The empire
Stn Nero, Chapter 39: More disasters
Stn Nero, Chapter 40: Insurrection of Vindex
Stn Vitellius, Chapter 2: His family

links of: Brittanica

No links in Edited sources found

links of: England

No links in Edited sources found

links of: Great Britain

No links in Edited sources found

links of: English

No links in Edited sources found

links of: Britons

Agr Chapter 11: The Britons
Agr Chapter 13: Claudius' expedition to Britain
Agr Chapter 15: Further problems in Britain (cont.)
Agr Chapter 18: Agricola in Britain
Agr Chapter 21: Agricola in Britain (cont.)
Agr Chapter 25: Agricola in Britain. Scotland
Agr Chapter 26: Agricola in Britain. Scotland (cont.)
Agr Chapter 27: Agricola in Britain. Scotland (cont.)
Agr Chapter 28: Agricola in Britain. The journey of the Usepii
Agr Chapter 29: Agricola in Britain. The Graupian Mountains
Agr Chapter 32: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Galcagus (cont.)
Agr Chapter 34: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Agricola (cont.)
Agr Chapter 36: Agricola in Britain. The battle
Agr Chapter 37: Agricola in Britain. The battle (cont.)
Agr Chapter 38: Agricola in Britain. The Romans win. Around England
Ann Book XII Chapter 33: Problems in Britain (cont.)
Ann Book XII Chapter 35: Problems in Britain. Caractacus (cont.)
Ann Book XIV Chapter 32: Further problems in Britain. Camulodunum conquered
Ann Book XIV Chapter 34: Further problems in Britain. Preparation for battle
Ann Book XIV Chapter 35: Further problems in Britain. Boudicea seeks allies
Ann Book XIV Chapter 37: Further problems in Britain. The battle
Aug The Deeds of the Divine Augustus
Dbg Book IV Chapter 21: Caesar in Britain. Preparations.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 34: Caesar in Britain. A storm causes a pause.
Dbg Book V Chapter 11: Caesar in Britain. The fleet and Cassivellaunus.
Dbg Book V Chapter 16: Caesar in Britain. Their way of fighting.
Dbg Book V Chapter 21: Caesar in Britain. The capital town of Cassivellaunus taken.
His Book III Chapter 45: Insurrection in Britain
His Book IV Chapter 74: The Batavian Uprise. Speech of Cerialis (cont.)
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 16: 745-842 The deification of Julius Caesar
Plt Pompey Chapter 51: Manipulations of Caesar
Stn Caligula, Chapter 44: Military affairs of Caligula (Cont.)

links of: Brittones

Gth Chapter 45: The end of the West.

links of: British

Agr Chapter 11: The Britons
Dbg Book IV Chapter 38: Problems with the Morini. The Morini beaten.
His Book I Chapter 43: Revolt of Otho. Death of Piso
His Book II Chapter 57: Otho versus Vitellius. Vitellus hears of his victory
His Book II Chapter 100: Revolt of Vespasian. Caecina marches
His Book III Chapter 1: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Preliminary discussions
His Book III Chapter 22: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. The battle near Cremona
His Book III Chapter 41: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Actions of Valens
His Book IV Chapter 15: The Batavian Uprise. Brinno
His Book IV Chapter 46: Nearly a mutiny
Stn Claudius, Chapter 21: Games.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 28: His freedmen.

links of: Britains

Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.
Quotes:
Britain, the largest of the islands which Roman geography includes, is so situated that it faces Germany on the east, Spain on the west; on the south it is even within sight of Gaul; its northern extremities, which have no shores opposite to them, are beaten by the waves of a vast open sea. The form of the entire country has been compared by Livy and Fabius Rusticus, the most graphic among ancient and modern historians, to an oblong shield or battle-axe.
Agr Chapter 10: Geography of Britain

Those who are nearest to the Gauls are also like them, either from the permanent influence of original descent, or, because in countries which run out so far to meet each other, climate has produced similar physical qualities.
Agr Chapter 11: The Britons

But a general survey inclines me to believe that the Gauls established themselves in an island so near to them. Their religious belief may be traced in the strongly-marked British superstition. The language differs but little; there is the same boldness in challenging danger, and, when it is near, the same timidity in shrinking from it. The Britons, however, exhibit more spirit, as being a people whom a long peace has not yet enervated. Indeed we have understood that even the Gauls were once renowned in war; but, after a while, sloth following on ease crept over them, and they lost their courage along with their freedom. This too has happened to the long-conquered tribes of Britain; the rest are still what the Gauls once were.
Agr Chapter 11: The Britons

Their strength is in infantry. Some tribes fight also with the chariot. The higher in rank is the charioteer; the dependants fight. They were once ruled by kings, but are now divided under chieftains into factions and parties. Our greatest advantage in coping with tribes so powerful is that they do not act in concert. Seldom is it that two or three states meet together to ward off a common danger. Thus, while they fight singly, all are conquered.
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Their sky is obscured by continual rain and cloud. Severity of cold is unknown. The days exceed in length those of our part of the world; the nights are bright, and in the extreme north so short that between sunlight and dawn you can perceive but a slight distinction. It is said that, if there are no clouds in the way, the splendour of the sun can be seen throughout the night, and that he does not rise and set, but only crosses the heavens. The truth is, that the low shadow thrown from the flat extremities of the earth's surface does not raise the darkness to any height, and the night thus fails to reach the sky and stars.
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Britain contains gold and silver and other metals, as the prize of conquest. The ocean, too, produces pearls, but of a dusky and bluish hue. Some think that those who collect them have not the requisite skill, as in the Red Sea the living and breathing pearl is torn from the rocks, while in Britain they are gathered just as they are thrown up. I could myself more readily believe that the natural properties of the pearls are in fault than our keenness for gain.
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

The Britons themselves bear cheerfully the conscription, the taxes, and the other burdens imposed on them by the empire, if there be no oppression
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

In that part of Britain which looks toward Ireland, he posted some troops, hoping for fresh conquests rather than fearing attack, inasmuch as Ireland, being between Britain and Spain and conveniently situated for the seas round Gaul, might have been the means of connecting with great mutual benefit the most powerful parts of the empire.
Agr Chapter 24: Agricola in Britain. On Ireland

The ocean, too, produces pearls, but of a dusky and bluish hue
Agr Chapter 12: More on Britain

Their mode of fighting with their chariots is this: firstly, they drive about in all directions and throw their weapons and generally break the ranks of the enemy with the very dread of their horses and the noise of their wheels; and when they have worked themselves in between the troops of horse, leap from their chariots and engage on foot.
Dbg Book IV Chapter 33: Caesar in Britain. Way of fighting of the Britains.

The interior portion of Britain is inhabited by those of whom they say that it is handed down by tradition that they were born in the island itself: the maritime portion by those who had passed over from the country of the Belgae for the purpose of plunder and making war; almost all of whom are called by the names of those states from which being sprung they went thither, and having waged war, continued there and began to cultivate the lands.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

The number of the people is countless, and their buildings exceedingly numerous, for the most part very like those of the Gauls: the number of cattle is great.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

They use either brass or iron rings, determined at a certain weight, as their money.
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

Tin produced in the midland regions; in the maritime, iron; but the quantity of it is small: they employ brass, which is imported
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

They do not regard it lawful to eat the hare, and the cock, and the goose; they, however, breed them for amusement and pleasure
Dbg Book V Chapter 12: Caesar in Britain. Description of the Britons.

The island is triangular in its form, and one of its sides is opposite to Gaul. One angle of this side, which is in Kent, whither almost all ships from Gaul are directed, [looks] to the east; the lower looks to the south. This side extends about 500 miles. Another side lies toward Spain and the west, on which part is Ireland, less, as is reckoned, than Britain, by one half: but the passage [from it] into Britain is of equal distance with that from Gaul. In the middle of this voyage, is an island, which is called Mona: many smaller islands besides are supposed to lie [there], of which islands some have written that at the time of the winter solstice it is night there for thirty consecutive days.
Dbg Book V Chapter 13: Caesar in Britain. Britain, Ireland, Man.

The most civilized of all these nations are they who inhabit Kent, which is entirely a maritime district, nor do they differ much from the Gallic customs.
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

Most of the inland inhabitants do not sow corn, but live on milk and flesh, and are clad with skins
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

All the Britains indeed, dye themselves with wood, which occasions a bluish color, and thereby have a more terrible appearance in fight
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

They wear their hair long, and have every part of their body shaved except their head and upper lip.
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

Ten and even twelve have wives common to them, and particularly brothers among brothers, and parents among their children; but if there be any issue by these wives, they are reputed to be the children of those by whom respectively each was first espoused when a virgin.
Dbg Book V Chapter 14: Caesar in Britain. Habits of the Britons.

The island of Britain, which is situated in the bosom of Ocean between Spain, Gaul and Germany.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Most of them say it is like a triangle pointing between the north and west. Its widest angle faces the mouths of the Rhine. Then the island shrinks in breadth and recedes until it ends in two other angles. Its long doubled side faces Gaul and Germany. Its greatest breadth is said to be over two thousand three hundred and ten stadia, and its length not more than seven thousand one hundred and thirty-two stadia.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

Moreover Strabo, a famous writer of the Greeks, relates that the island exhales such mists from its soil, soaked by the frequent inroads of Ocean, that the sun is covered throughout the whole of their disagreeable sort of day that passes as fair, and so is hidden from sight.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

All the people and their kings are alike wild
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

They live in wattled huts, a shelter used in common with their flocks, and often the woods are their home. They paint their bodies with iron-red, whether by way of adornment or perhaps for some other reason.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.

They fight not only on horseback or on foot, but even with scythed two-horse chariots, which they commonly call essedae.
Gth Chapter 2: About Britain.


Other links:
World66: England
Lonely Planet: England [M]
Cath.Encyc.: England before 1066
Britain, Phoenicia's Secret Treasure, and its Conversion to Christianity
History of Britain
King Arthur [L]
Newton Chapter 6: the Ten Horns
England
Meaning of letters between [ and ]:
A: Roman remains. C: Coins. L: Links. M: Map. P: Peutinger


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Term referred to by name of the following persons:
If the number following a name is identical to the
number following another name, then the names
refer to the same person.

Cynobellinus(12687)
Cassivellaunus(698)
Adminius(12686)
Dumnobellaunus(12763)
Tincommius(12768)
Riothamus(3667)
Ptolemy II(841)