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Quote of the day: This Tiberius did not approve, either in

Persons: Quotes and links to a source

List of used abbreviations:
Agr:
Ann:
Aug:
Dbg:
Ger:
Gth:
His:
Hor:
Msp:
NwT:
Ovd:
Plt:
Stn:
Vrg:
Tacitus' Agricola.
Tacitus' Annals.
The Deeds of the Divine Augustus
De Bello Gallico, by Julius Caesar
Tacitus' Germania.
The Goths, by Jordanes.
Histories, by Tacitus.
History of Rome, by Livy.
Mispogon by Julian
New Testament.
Metamorphosis by Ovid.
Parallel lives by Plutarch.
Suetonius 12 Caesars
Virgil Aeneid.

Quotes by person:

Achilles
What was the name of Achilles among the maidens? What were the Sirens in the habit of singing?
Quote by Tiberius
Stn Tiberius Chapter 70: Interest in literature.

Achilles
Achilles, thy pretended sire
Quote by Priam
Vrg Book II Chapter 22: Death of Priam

Aeneas
That Phrygian eunuch.
Quote by Turnus
Vrg Book XI Chapter 4: A funeral truce

Aeneas
Aeneas, famed for faithful prayer.
Vrg Book VI Chapter 16: Crossing the Styx

Aeneas
A king we had; Aeneas, -- never man in all the world more loyal, just and true, nor mightier in arms!
Vrg Book I Chapter 31: Obituary of Aeneas

Aeneas
For my foeman when we meet will find no goddess-mother near, with hand to hide him in her woman's skirt of cloud, herself in dim, deluding shade concealed.
Quote by Turnus
Vrg Book XI Chapter 2: Lament over Pallas

Agamemnon
There is still a father even in a king
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 2: 60-142 Pythagoras' Teachings: Vegetarianism

Agamemnon
Then a cruel oracle ordered Agamemnon to sacrifice his innocent daughter, Iphigenia, to pitiless Diana.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 2: 60-142 Pythagoras' Teachings: Vegetarianism

Agricola
It was the case of a lofty and aspiring soul craving with more eagerness than caution the beauty and splendour of great and glorious renown. But it was soon mellowed by reason and experience, and he retained from his learning that most difficult of lessons -- moderation.
Agr Chapter 4: His parents

Agricola
Should posterity wish to know something of his appearance, it was graceful rather than commanding.
Agr Chapter 44: Obituary of Agricola

Agricola
When his public and judicial duties required it, he was dignified, thoughtful, austere, and yet often merciful; when business was done with, he wore no longer the official character. He was altogether without harshness, pride, or the greed of gain. With a most rare felicity, his good nature did not weaken his authority, nor his strictness the attachment of his friends.
Agr Chapter 9: In Aquitania

Agricola
He sought to make himself acquainted with the province and known to the army; he would learn from the skilful, and keep pace with the bravest, would attempt nothing for display, would avoid nothing from fear, and would be at once careful and vigilant.
Agr Chapter 5: In Britain

Agrippa
He, the negotiator and arbitrator of the reconciliation, who acted as the ambassador of the patricians to the plebs, and brought them back to the City, did not possess money enough to defray the cost of his funeral. He was interred by the plebeians, each man contributing a sextans towards the expense.
Hor Book II Chapter 33: League with the Latins

Agrippa Postumus
Who, though devoid of worthy qualities, and having only the brute courage of physical strength, …
Ann Book I Chapter 3: Augustus' succession

Agrippa Postumus
For she had gained such a hold on the aged Augustus that he drove out as an exile into the island of Planasia his only grandson, Agrippa Postumus
Ann Book I Chapter 3: Augustus' succession

Agrippa Postumus
The first crime of the new reign was the murder of Postumus Agrippa.
Ann Book I Chapter 6: Murder of Agrippa Posthumus (14 AD)

Agrippina the Elder
Such zeal, he thought, could not be guileless; it was not against a foreign foe that she was thus courting the soldiers. Generals had nothing left them when a woman went among the companies, attended the standards, ventured on bribery, as though it showed but slight ambition to parade her son in a common soldier's uniform and wish him to be called Caesar Caligula.
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book I Chapter 69: War with the Germans. The bridge over the Rhine

Agrippina the Elder
Prevented the bridge over the Rhine from being destroyed
Ann Book I Chapter 69: War with the Germans. The bridge over the Rhine

Agrippina the Elder
Protesting that she was a descendant of the Divine Augustus and could face peril with no degenerate spirit
Ann Book I Chapter 40: Revolt in Germania. Agrippina leaves the camp

Agrippina the Elder
Livia feeling a stepmother's bitterness towards Agrippina
Ann Book I Chapter 33: Revolt in Germania. Germanicus

Agrippina the Elder
Do you think a wrong is done you, dear daughter, if you are not empress?
Quote by Tiberius
Stn Tiberius Chapter 53: Death of Agrippina

Agrippina the Elder
Agrippina herself too being rather excitable, only her purity and love of her husband gave a right direction to her otherwise imperious disposition.
Ann Book I Chapter 33: Revolt in Germania. Germanicus

Agrippina the Younger
Cluvius relates that Agrippina in her eagerness to retain her influence went so far that more than once at midday, when Nero, even at that hour, was flushed with wine and feasting, she presented herself attractively attired to her half intoxicated son and offered him her person
Ann Book XIV Chapter 2: The Murder of Agrippina Minor. She tries to seduce Nero

Agrippina the Younger
Many years before Agrippina had anticipated this end for herself and had spurned the thought. For when she consulted the astrologers about Nero, they replied that he would be emperor and kill his mother. Let him kill her, she said, provided he is emperor.
Ann Book XIV Chapter 9: The Murder of Agrippina Minor. Her funeral

Agrippina the Younger
Smite my womb
Ann Book XIV Chapter 8: The Murder of Agrippina Minor. Success

Agrippina the Younger
Nothing that was not abominable and a public bane could be born of Agrippina and himself.
Quote by Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
Stn Nero, Chapter 6: The youth of Nero

Agrippina the Younger
Agrippina, who was terrible in her hatred
Ann Book XII Chapter 22: Exile for Lollia

Alcibiades
He avoided and repelled the approaches of everyone, but embraced with kisses and the greatest show of affection Alcibiades, then in his hot youth. And when Apemantus was astonished, and demanded the reason, he replied that he knew this young man would one day do infinite mischief to the Athenians.
Plt Antony Chapter 70: Timon of Athens

Alexander the Great
It is a disagreeable task in the case of so great a man to have to record his ostentatious love of dress; the prostrations which he demanded from all who approached his presence, and which the Macedonian must have felt to be humiliating, even had they been vanquished, how much more when they were victors; the terribly cruel punishments he inflicted; the murder of his friends at the banquet-table; the vanity which made him invent a divine pedigree for himself.
Hor Book IX Chapter 18: Comparison continued.

Alexander the Great
Do you think," said he, "I have not just cause to weep, when I consider that Alexander at my age had conquered so many nations, and I have all this time done nothing that is memorable?"
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Caesar Chapter 11: Caesar in Spain. Caesar and Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great
Both had a graceful person and were of noble birth; neither had much exceeded thirty years of age, and both fell by the treachery of their own people in strange lands
Ann Book II Chapter 73: Illness and death of Germanicus. His funeral.

Alexander the Great
No man was less capable of bearing prosperity than he was.
Hor Book IX Chapter 18: Comparison continued.

Alexander the Great
When he drank his destruction at Babylon through the treachery of an attendant.
Gth Chapter 10: Persians and Macedonia.

Alexander the Great
What, pray, would have happened if his love of wine had become stronger and his passionate nature more violent and fiery as he grew older?
Hor Book IX Chapter 18: Comparison continued.

Alexander the Great
He had excelled Alexander in clemency, in self-restraint, and in all other virtues
Ann Book II Chapter 73: Illness and death of Germanicus. His funeral.

Alexander the Great
The aspect of Italy would have struck him as very different from the India which he traversed in drunken revelry with an intoxicated army:
Hor Book IX Chapter 17: Comparison of the Strength of Rome and of Macedonia under Alexander the Great

Amphicrates
Of whom it is told that he left his country and fled to Seleucia, upon the river Tigris, and, being desired to teach logic among them, arrogantly replied, that the dish was too little to hold a dolphin.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 22: Administration of Asia

Antiochus IV Epiphanes
When the Macedonians became supreme, king Antiochus strove to destroy the national superstition, and to introduce Greek civilization, but was prevented by his war with the Parthians from at all improving this vilest of nations; for at this time the revolt of Arsaces had taken place.
His Book V Chapter 8: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Antonius Musa
To the physician Antonius Musa, who had cured him of a dangerous illness, they erected a statue.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 59: Further honours.

Antonius Primus
He was brave in battle, ready of speech, dexterous in bringing odium upon other men, powerful amidst civil strife and rebellion, rapacious, prodigal, the worst of citizens in peace, but in war no contemptible ally.
His Book II Chapter 86: Revolt of Vespasian. Primus Antonius

Antonius Primus
All I can say is this, that neither in Antonius nor in Hormus would this foulest of crimes have been a degeneracy from the character of their former lives.
His Book III Chapter 28: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. The attack continues

Antonius Primus
And everyone else inveighed against him, as an ill-affected and conceited man, nor did they forget the scandals of his early life. Antonius himself failed not to provoke offence by his arrogance and his excessive propensity to dwell on his own services.
His Book IV Chapter 80: Vespasian emperor. Antonius Priscus

Appius Claudius
He had assumed such a new character that from being a stern and bitter enemy of the people he suddenly appeared as their advocate, and trimmed his sails to catch every breath of popular favour.
Hor Book III Chapter 33: The Decemvirate.

Appius Claudius
Appius Claudius, he said, alone was outside the laws, outside all the bonds that held states or even human society together. Let men cast their eyes on that tribunal, the fortress of all villainies, where that perpetual decemvir, surrounded by hangmen not lictors, in contempt of gods and men alike, wreaked his vengeance on the goods, the backs, and the lives of the citizens, threatening all indiscriminately with the rods and axes, and then when his mind was diverted from rapine and murder to lust, tore a free-born maiden from her father's arms before the eyes of Rome, and gave her to a client, the minister of his intrigues -- that tribunal where by cruel decree and infamous judgment he armed the father's hand against the daughter, where he ordered those who took up the maiden's lifeless body -- her betrothed lover and her grandfather -- to be thrown into prison, moved less by her death than by the check to his criminal gratification.
Quote by Verginius
Hor Book III Chapter 57: The case of Appius Claudius (Cont.)

Appius Claudius
Appius Claudius was keenly alive to the chance that he might not be reelected, in spite of his age and the honours he had enjoyed. You could hardly tell whether to consider him as a decemvir or a candidate. Sometimes he was more like one who sought office than one who actually held it; he abused the nobility, and extolled all the candidates who had neither birth nor personal weight to recommend them;
Hor Book III Chapter 35: The Second Decemvirate.

Appius Claudius
By this blood, Appius, I devote thy head to the infernal gods.
Quote by Lucius Icilius
Hor Book III Chapter 48: The death of Verginia.

Appius Claudius Crassinus Inregillensis Sabinus
Appius displayed the same savage temper in the field that he had shown at home, only it was more unrestrained because he was not now fettered by the tribunes. He hated the commons with a more intense hatred than his father had felt, for they had got the better of him and had carried their Law though he had been elected consul as being the one man who could thwart the tribunitian power -- a Law, too, which former consuls, from whom the senate expected less than from him, had obstructed with less trouble.
Hor Book II Chapter 58: War with the Volscians and Aequi.

Appius Claudius Crassus Ingregillensis
The passion and delight of hunting carries men through frost and snow to the forests and the mountains
Hor Book V Chapter 6: War with Veii. Speech of Appius Claudius. Cont.

Appius Claudius Sabinus Inregillensis
Appius Claudius, harsh by nature, and now maddened by the hatred of the plebs on the one hand and the praises of the senate on the other, asserted that these riotous gatherings were not the result of misery but of licence, the plebeians were actuated by wantonness more than by anger.
Hor Book II Chapter 29: Secession of the Plebs (Cont.)

Appius Claudius Sabinus Inregillensis
Appius, partly from his innate love of tyranny
Hor Book II Chapter 27: Secession of the Plebs and Fifth Sabine war

Appuleia Varilia
Her insinuations against himself he did not wish to be the subject of judicial inquiry.
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book II Chapter 50: Adultery.

Ariobarzanes
Singularly handsome person and noble spirit.
Ann Book II Chapter 4: Commotion in Parthia and Armenia. Gaius Caesar in Armenia (20 BC)

Arminius
With his naturally furious temper
Ann Book I Chapter 59: War with the Germans. Speech of Arminius

Arminius
Famous ... for treachery … towards us.
Ann Book I Chapter 55: War with the Germans. Arminius and Segestes

Arminius
Arminius in his infatuation and ignorance was taking to himself the glory which belonged to another, for he had treacherously surprised three unofficered legions and a general who had not an idea of perfidy, to the great hurt of Germany and to his own disgrace, since his wife and his son were still enduring slavery.
Quote by Marobodus
Ann Book II Chapter 46: War with the Germans. Maroboduus and Arminius (cont.)

Asiaticus
And honoured with the ring of knighthood this same Asiaticus, a slave of infamous character, ever seeking power by unprincipled intrigues.
His Book II Chapter 57: Otho versus Vitellius. Vitellus hears of his victory

Attila
He was a man born into the world to shake the nations, the scourge of all lands, who in some way terrified all mankind by the dreadful rumors noised abroad concerning him.
Gth Chapter 35: Attila the Hun.

Attila
He was short of stature, with a broad chest and a large head; his eyes were small, his beard thin and sprinkled with gray; and he had a flat nose and a swarthy complexion, showing the evidences of his origin.
Gth Chapter 35: Attila the Hun.

Attila
He had given himself up to excessive joy at his wedding, and as he lay on his back, heavy with wine and sleep, a rush of superfluous blood, which would ordinarily have flowed from his nose, streamed in deadly course down his throat and killed him, since it was hindered in the usual passages
Gth Chapter 49: The death of Attila.

Augustus
He had so great a dread of thunder and lightning that he always carried about him a seal's skin by way of preservation.
Quote by Romulus
Stn Augustus, Chapter 90: Dread of thunder.

Augustus
Nine months for common births the Fates decree;
But, for the great, reduce the term to three.

Stn Claudius, Chapter 1: His ancestry: Drusus.

Augustus
He had not even adopted Tiberius as his successor out of affection or any regard to the State, but, having thoroughly seen his arrogant and savage temper, he had sought glory for himself by a contrast of extreme wickedness.
Ann Book I Chapter 10: The reign of Augustus(cont.)

Augustus
We ought to write as we speak
Stn Augustus, Chapter 88: His spelling.

Augustus
He likewise read whole books to the senate.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 89: His literature.

Augustus
It was Augustus who first, under colour of this law, applied legal inquiry to libellous writings provoked, as he had been, by the licentious freedom with which Cassius Severus had defamed men and women of distinction in his insulting satires.
Ann Book I Chapter 72: Prosecutions for Majestas

Augustus
He could not easily bear either heat or cold.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 81: His diseases.

Augustus
Nor half so far triumphant Bacchus drove, With vine-entwisted reins, his frolic team Of tigers from the tall-topped Indian hill.
Quote by Anchises
Vrg Book VI Chapter 31: The future (cont.)

Augustus
he once jocosely rebuked a man, by telling him, You present your memorial with as much hesitation as if you were offering money to an elephant.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 53: His modesty.

Augustus
Then, when by a decree of the Senate he had usurped the high functions and authority of Praetor when Hirtius and Pansa were slain - whether they were destroyed by the enemy, or Pansa by poison infused into a wound, Hirtius by his own soldiers and Caesar's treacherous machinations
Ann Book I Chapter 10: The reign of Augustus(cont.)

Augustus
The infirmities of Augustus increased, and some suspected guilt on his wife's part.
Ann Book I Chapter 5: The death of Augustus

Augustus
I see, even now, a city, destined for Phrygian descendants, than which none is greater, or shall be, or has been, in past ages. Other leaders will make her powerful, through the long centuries, but one, born of the blood of Iulus, will make her mistress of the world.
Quote by Helenus
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 11: 418-452 Pythagoras' Teachings:Transfers of Power

Augustus
When earth has benefited from him, the celestial regions will enjoy him, and heaven will be his goal.
Quote by Helenus
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 11: 418-452 Pythagoras' Teachings:Transfers of Power

Augustus
For she had gained such a hold on the aged Augustus that he drove out as an exile into the island of Planasia his only grandson, Agrippa Postumus
Ann Book I Chapter 3: Augustus' succession

Augustus
Behold, at last, that man, for this is he, So oft unto thy listening ears foretold, Augustus Caesar, kindred unto Jove. He brings a golden age.
Quote by Anchises
Vrg Book VI Chapter 30: The future is described

Augustus
His favorite spectacle was the Trojan game acted by a select number of boys, in parties differing in age and station; thinking that it was a practice both excellent in itself, and sanctioned by ancient usage, that the spirit of the young nobles should be displayed in such exercises.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 43: On spectacles.

Augustus
And Pylades he not only banished from the city, but from Italy also, for pointing with his finger at a spectator by whom, he was hissed, and turning the eyes of the audience upon him.
Quote by Cerialis
Stn Augustus, Chapter 45: His personal interest.

Augustus
Our ancestors wanted Janus Quirinus to be closed when throughout the all the rule of the Roman people, by land and sea, peace had been secured through victory. Although before my birth it had been closed twice in all in recorded memory from the founding of the city, the senate voted three times in my principate that it be closed.
Aug The Deeds of the Divine Augustus

Augustus
It was resolved that he should rather be called Augustus, a surname not only new, but of more dignity, because places devoted to religion, and those in which anything is consecrated by augury, are denominated August, either from the word auctus, signifying augmentation, or Ab Avium Gestu, gustuve from the flight and feeding of birds; as appears from this verse of Ennius: When glorious Rome by August augury was built.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 7: The youth of Augustus. Cont.

Augustus
The death of Pansa was so fully believed to have been caused by undue means, that Glyco, his surgeon, was placed in custody, on a suspicion of having poisoned his wound. And to this, Aquilius Niger adds, that he killed Hirtius, the other consul, in the confusion of the battle, with his own hands.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 11: Siege of Modena. Cont.

Augustus
Two others, father and son, who begged for their lives, he ordered to cast lots which of them should live, or settle it between themselves by the sword; and was a spectator of both their deaths for the father offering his life to save his son, and being accordingly executed, the son likewise killed himself upon the spot.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 13: The battle of Philippi

Augustus
But he never made war upon any nation without just and necessary cause;
Stn Augustus, Chapter 21: Military actions in the East

Augustus
He was in such consternation at this event, that he let the hair of his head and beard grow for several months, and sometimes knocked his head against the door-post, crying out, O, Quintilius Varus! give me back my legions!
Stn Augustus, Chapter 23: Varus and the Germans

Augustus
The senate decreed that vows be undertaken for my health by the consuls and priests every fifth year. In fulfillment of these vows they often celebrated games for my life; several times the four highest colleges of priests, several times the consuls. Also both privately and as a city all the citizens unanimously and continuously prayed at all the shrines for my health.
Aug The Deeds of the Divine Augustus

Augustus
To the physician Antonius Musa, who had cured him of a dangerous illness, they erected a statue.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 59: Further honours.

Augustus
He restored the calendar, ... and upon that occasion, called the month Sextilis, by his own name, August,
Stn Augustus, Chapter 31: Religious measures.

Augustus
He was five feet and nine inches in height.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 79: His appearance.

Augustus
On account of the things successfully done by me and through my officers, under my auspices, on earth and sea, the senate decreed fifty-five times that there be sacrifices to the immortal gods
Aug The Deeds of the Divine Augustus

Augustus
He took particular pleasure in witnessing pugilistic contests.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 45: His personal interest.

Augustus
And Pylades he not only banished from the city, but from Italy also, for pointing with his finger at a spectator by whom, he was hissed, and turning the eyes of the audience upon him.
Quote by Cerialis
Stn Augustus, Chapter 45: His personal interest.

Augustus
And when Tiberius, in a letter, complained of the affront with great earnestness, he returned him an answer in the following terms: Do not, my dear Tiberius, give way to the ardour of youth in this affair; nor be so indignant that any person should speak ill of me. It is enough, for us, if we can prevent anyone from really doing us mischief.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 51: On insults.

Augustus
He melted down all the silver statues which had been erected to him
Stn Augustus, Chapter 52: No divine honour for him.

Augustus
Nor was any one ever molested for his freedom of speech, although it was carried to the extent of insolence.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 54: Freedom of speech.

Augustus
Augustus had an easy and fluent way of speaking, such as became a sovereign.
Ann Book XIII Chapter 3: The funeral of Claudius

Augustus
He was handsome and graceful.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 79: His appearance.

Augustus
He then caused all prophetical books, both in Latin and Greek, the authors of which were either unknown, or of no great authority, to be brought in; and the whole collection, amounting to upwards of two thousand volumes, he committed to the flames, preserving only the Sibylline oracles;
Stn Augustus, Chapter 31: Religious measures.

Augustus
To the Vestal Virgins he granted seats in the theatre, reserved for them only, opposite the praetor's bench.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 44: On seats at the public games.

Aulus Caecina Alienus
Caecina revelled more freely in plunder and bloodshed
His Book I Chapter 67: Revolt of Vitellius. The Helvetii

Aulus Caecina Alienus
An overbearing, foreign-seeming man, of gigantic stature and always dressed in trews and sleeves, after the manner of the Gauls, whilst he conversed with Roman officials and magistrates.
Plt Otho Chapter 6: Otho versus Vitellius; the siege of Placentia

Aunus
His doom cut short a life of lies
Vrg Book XI Chapter 26: The killing by Camilla

Bacchus
Nor half so far triumphant Bacchus drove, With vine-entwisted reins, his frolic team Of tigers from the tall-topped Indian hill.
Quote by Anchises
Vrg Book VI Chapter 31: The future (cont.)

Berenice of Chios
Berenice had prepared a potion for herself, but at her mother's entreaty, who stood by, she gave her part of it. Both drank of the potion, which prevailed over the weaker body. But Berenice, having drunk too little, was not released by it, but lingering on unable to die, was strangled by Bacchides for haste.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 18: Death of the family of Mithridate

Brutus
Brutus, ... told them he had been competent to pass sentence by himself upon his own sons, but left the rest to the suffrages of the free citizens: "Let every man speak that wishes, and persuade whom he can."
Quote by Brutus
Plt Publicola, chapter 7: The other conspirators are also executed

Brutus
It is not," said he, "these well fed, long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and the hungry looking;" meaning Brutus and Cassius.
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Antony Chapter 11: Caesar and Antony

Brutus
And when it was told him that Antony and Dolabella were in a plot against him, he said he did not fear such fat, luxurious men, but rather the pale, lean fellows, meaning Cassius and Brutus
Plt Caesar Chapter 62: Caesar murdered; preliminaries

Caecilia Metella
his mother Caecilia's reputation was bad
Plt Lucullus Chapter 1: His ancestry and youth

Caesarion
Too many Caesars are not well.
Quote by Areius
Plt Antony Chapter 81: The children of Antony and Caesarion

Caligula
It was well said of him that no one had ever been a better slave or a worse master
Stn Caligula, Chapter 10: Caligula on Capri.

Caligula
He could not control his natural cruelty and viciousness, but he was a most eager witness of the tortures and executions of those who suffered punishment revelling at night in gluttony and adultery.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 11: Caligula on Capri (cont.)

Caligula
Once too when Gaius Caesar in a casual conversation ridiculed Lucius Sulla, he predicted to him that he would have all Sulla's vices and none of his virtues
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book VI Chapter 46: Succession of Tiberius

Caligula
no evidence convinced him so positively that she was sprung from his own loins as her savage temper, which was even then so violent that she would try to scratch the faces and eyes of the little children who played with her.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 25: Caligula as a monster (Cont.)

Caligula
There never was a better slave or a worse master.
Quote by Passienus
Ann Book VI Chapter 20: Gaius Caesar

Caligula
He was a man who masked a savage temper under an artful guise of self-restraint, and neither his mother's doom nor the banishment of his brothers extorted from him a single utterance.
Ann Book VI Chapter 20: Gaius Caesar

Caligula
Because he often wore the shoe so called, to win the men's goodwill.
Ann Book I Chapter 41: Revolt in Germania. Germanicus' family

Caligula
At the same moment he embraced the younger of his two grandsons with a flood of tears, and, noting the savage face of the other, said, "You will slay this boy, and will be yourself slain by another
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book VI Chapter 46: Succession of Tiberius

Caligula
Was it probable that, when Tiberius with his long experience of affairs was, under the influence of absolute power, wholly perverted and changed, Gaius Caesar, who had hardly completed his boyhood, was thoroughly ignorant and bred under the vilest training, would enter on a better course, with Macro for his guide, who having been selected for his superior wickedness, to crush Sejanus had by yet more numerous crimes been the scourge of the State?
Quote by Lucius Arruntius
Ann Book VI Chapter 48: Arruntius and Albucilla

Caligula
He used to say now and then that to allow Gaius to live would prove the ruin of himself and of all men, and that he was rearing a viper for the Roman people and a Phaethon for the world.
Quote by Tiberius
Stn Caligula, Chapter 11: Caligula on Capri (cont.)

Caligula
He lived in habitual incest with all his sisters.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 24: Caligula and Drusilla.

Caligula
He had the manager of his gladiatorial shows and beast-baitings beaten with chains in his presence for several successive days, and would not kill him until he was disgusted at the stench of his putrefied brain.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 27: Caligula as a monster (Cont.)

Caligula
Saying that the rule of Augustus had been made famous by the Varus massacre and that of Tiberius by the collapse of the amphitheatre at Fidenae, while his own was threatened with oblivion because of its prosperity
Stn Caligula, Chapter 31: Caligula as a monster (Cont.)

Caligula
He would bathe in hot or cold perfumed oils, drink pearls of great price dissolved in vinegar…
Stn Caligula, Chapter 37: Caligula as a monster (Cont.)

Caligula
He wrote besides to his financial agents to prepare for a triumph at the smallest possible cost, but on a grander scale than had ever before been known, since the goods of all were at their disposal.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 47: Military affairs of Caligula (Cont.)

Caligula
There was found besides a great chest full of divers kinds of poisons, which they say were later thrown into the sea by Claudius and so infected was it as to kill the fish, which were thrown up by the tide upon the neighboring shores.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 49: Military affairs of Caligula (Cont.)

Caligula
His hair [was] thin and entirely gone on the top of his head, though his body was hairy.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 50: His countenance.

Caligula
he never rested more than three hours at night, and even for that length of time he did not sleep quietly, but was terrified by strange apparitions
Stn Caligula, Chapter 50: His countenance.

Caligula
For this man, who so utterly despised the gods, was wont at the slightest thunder and lightning to shut his eyes, to muffle up his head, and if they increased, to leap from his bed and hide under it.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 51: His fears.

Caligula
Even Gaius Caesar 's disordered intellect did not wholly mar his faculty of speech.
Ann Book XIII Chapter 3: The funeral of Claudius

Caligula
Besides a stall of marble, a manger of ivory, purple blankets and a collar of precious stones he even gave this horse [Incitatus] a house, a troop of slaves and furniture, for the more elegant entertainment of the guests invited in his name; and it is also said that he planned to make him consul.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 55: Caligula and the circus.

Caligula
He began from that time on to lay claim to divine majesty; for after giving orders that such statues of the gods as were especially famous for their sanctity or their artistic merit, including that of Jupiter of Olympia, should be brought from Greece, in order to remove their heads and put his own in their place.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 22: The Divine Caligula.

Callimachus
Callimachus, who, by his great engineering skill, and his dexterity at all the shifts and subtleties of a siege, had greatly incommoded the Romans.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 19: Siege of Amisus

Calliphaeia
The everlasting universe contains four generative states of matter. Of these, two, earth and water, are heavy, and sink lower, under their own weight. The other two lack heaviness, and, if not held down, they seek height: that is air, and fire, purer than air.
Quote by Pythagoras of Samos
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 6: 237-258 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Elements

Camillus
During his censorship one very good act of his is recorded, that, whereas the wars had made many widows, he obliged such as had no wives, some by fair persuasion, others by threatening to set fines on their heads, to take them in marriage; another necessary one, in causing orphans to be rated, who before were exempted from taxes, the frequent wars requiring more than ordinary expenses to maintain them
Plt Camillus, chapter 2: Soldier and censor

Carmentis
He was looked up to with reverence for his knowledge of letters -- a new and marvellous thing for uncivilized men - but he was still more revered because of his mother, who was believed to be a divine being and regarded with wonder, by all as an interpreter of Fate, in the days before the arrival of the Sibyl in Italy.
Hor Book I Chapter 7: Death of Remus. The Legend of Hercules and Cacus.

Cassandra
What mortal ear gave heed to sad Cassandra's voice divine?
Vrg Book III Chapter 9: Aeneas is sent to Hesperia

Cato the Younger
Cato was his friend and connection, but, nevertheless, so hated his life and habits, that when a young man in the senate made a long and tedious speech in praise of frugality and temperance, Cato got up and said, "How long do you mean to go on making money like Crassus, living like Lucullus, and talking like Cato?"
Plt Lucullus Chapter 40: A luxurious life for Lucullus (cont.)

Celer
Celer upon this fled instantly into Tuscany, and from him the Romans call all men that are swift of foot Celeres
Plt Romulus, chapter 12: Remus killed.

Cerialis
I have never cultivated eloquence; it is by my sword that I have asserted the excellence of the Roman people. Since, however, words have very great weight with you, since you estimate good and evil, not according to their real value, but according to the representations of seditious men, I have resolved to say a few words, which, as the war is at an end, it may be useful for you to have heard rather than for me to have spoken.
His Book IV Chapter 73: The Batavian Uprise. Speech of Cerialis

Charybdis
Pitiless Charybdis, who draws down to the wild whirling of her steep abyss the monster waves, and ever and anon flings them at heaven
Quote by Helenus
Vrg Book III Chapter 16: Prophecy of Helenus (cont.)

Cicero
Cicero was the first who had any suspicions of his designs upon the government, and, as a good pilot is apprehensive of a storm when the sea is most smiling, saw the designing temper of the man through this disguise of good-humor and affability, and said, that in general, in all he did and undertook, he detected the ambition for absolute power, "but when I see his hair so carefully arranged, and observe him adjusting it with one finger, I cannot imagine it should enter into such a man's thoughts to subvert the Roman state."
Plt Caesar Chapter 4: Caesar as a lawyer

Cincinnatus
The one hope of Rome, Lucius Quinctius, used to cultivate a four-acre field on the other side of the Tiber, just opposite the place where the dockyard and arsenal are now situated; it bears the name of the Quinctian Meadows." There he was found by the deputation from the senate either digging out a ditch or ploughing, at all events, as is generally agreed, intent on his husbandry.
Hor Book III Chapter 26: War with the Aequi and Sabines. Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

Cincinnatus
At last, after well-merited commendations were showered upon him from all parts of the House and he was assured that "in that aged mind there was not only more wisdom but more courage than in all the rest," whilst the consul adhered to his decision, he yielded. After a prayer to heaven that in such a time of danger his old age might not prove a source of harm or discredit to the republic, Cincinnatus was made dictator.
Hor Book IV Chapter 13: The Treason and Death of Spurius Maelius.

Cincinnatus
It was, he said, through the apathy of that order that the tribunes of the plebs, now perpetually in office, acted as kings in their speeches and accusations, as though they were living, not in the common-wealth of Rome, but in some wretched ill-regulated family. Courage, resolution, all that makes youth distinguished at home and in the battle-field, had been expelled and banished from Rome with his son Caeso. Loquacious agitators, sowers of discord, made tribunes for the second and third time in succession, were living by means of infamous practices in regal licentiousness.
Hor Book III Chapter 19: The Terentilian Law -- Fresh Troubles.

Claudia
When her carriage made but slow progress through the throng, she openly gave vent to the wish that her brother Pulcher might come to life and lose another fleet, to make less of a crowd in Rome
Stn Tiberius Chapter 2: Attack on Drepanum.

Claudius
A weak intellect was against him.
Ann Book VI Chapter 46: Succession of Tiberius

Claudius
Having heard some loose reports of conspiracies formed against him, he was so much alarmed that he thought of immediately abdicating the government.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 36: Fear and distrust (cont.)

Claudius
He scarcely ever left the table until he had thoroughly crammed himself and drank to intoxication; and then he would immediately fall asleep, lying upon his back with his mouth open. While in this condition, a feather was put down his throat, to make him throw up the contents of his stomach. Upon composing himself to rest, his sleep was short, and he usually awoke before midnight; but he would sometimes sleep in the daytime
Stn Claudius, Chapter 33: His other habits.

Claudius
When he indulged himself with sleep after eating, which was a common practice with him, the company used to throw olive-stones and dates at him
Stn Claudius, Chapter 8: During Caligula's reign (cont.)

Claudius
His cruel and sanguinary disposition was exhibited upon great as well as trifling occasions. When any person was to be put to the torture, or criminal punished for parricide, he was impatient for the execution, and would have it performed in his own presence.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 34: His cruelty.

Claudius
He … declared in some short speeches which he published, that he had only feigned imbecility in the reign of Gaius, because otherwise it would have been impossible for him to have escaped
Stn Claudius, Chapter 38: Passion and resentment.

Claudius
e being the first of the Caesars who purchased the submission of the soldiers with money.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 10: Death of Caligula

Claudius
But the characteristics most predominant in him were fear and distrust….When Camillus formed his plot against him, not doubting but his timidity might be worked upon without a war, he wrote to him a scurrilous, petulant, and threatening letter, desiring him to resign the government, and betake himself to a life of privacy. Upon receiving this requisition, he had some thoughts of complying with it, and summoned together the principal men of the city, to consult with them on the subject.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 35: Fear and distrust.

Claudius
Many of those whom he had condemned to death, he ordered the day after to be invited to his table, and to game with him
Stn Claudius, Chapter 39: Indifference and unconcern.

Claudius
And he likewise invented and published for use some new letters, having discovered, as he said, that even the Greek alphabet alphabet not been completed at once.
Ann Book XI Chapter 13: Claudius invents new letters.

Claudius
for how he who talks so ill, should be able to declaim so clearly and properly, I cannot imagine."
Quote by Augustus
Stn Claudius, Chapter 4: Augustus on Claudius.

Claudius
Claudius, impatient as he was of a single life and submissive to the rule of wives.
Ann Book XII Chapter 1: Claudius marries again. The choice

Claudius
He banished from Rome all the Jews, who were continually making disturbances at the instigation of one Chrestus.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Claudius
The religious rites of the Druids, solemnized with such horrid cruelties, which had only been forbidden the citizens of Rome during the reign of Augustus, he utterly abolished among the Gauls.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Claudius
an abortion of a man, that had only been begun, but never finished, by nature.
Quote by Antonia Augusta the Younger
Stn Claudius, Chapter 3: Claudius as a young man.

Claudius
As I have been so unhappy in my unions, I am resolved to continue in future unmarried; and if I should not, I give you leave to stab me.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 26: His marriages.

Claudius
He altered a clause added by Tiberius to the Papia-Poppaean Law, which inferred that men of sixty years of age were incapable of begetting children.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 23: Administration of justice (cont.)

Claudius
He besides invented three new letters, and added them to the former alphabet, as highly necessary.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 41: Claudius invents new letters

Claudius
Nor did Claudius, when he spoke with preparation, lack elegance
Ann Book XIII Chapter 3: The funeral of Claudius

Claudius
He was outrageous in his laughter, and still more so in his wrath, for then he foamed at the mouth, and discharged from his nostrils. He also stammered in his speech, and had a tremulous motion of the head at all times, but particularly when he was engaged in any business, however trifling.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 30: His appearance.

Claudius
It is said, too, that he intended to publish an edict, " allowing to all people the liberty of giving vent at table to any distention occasioned by flatulence," upon hearing of a person whose modesty, when under restraint, had nearly cost him his life.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 32: Entertainments.

Claudius
Tiberius insisting to have him excused on account of his imbecility
Quote by Tiberius
Stn Claudius, Chapter 6: Public respect.

Claudius
He exonerated for ever the people of Troy from the payment of taxes, as being the founders of the Roman race;
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Claudius
he was directed not so much by his own judgment, as by the influence of his wives and freedmen; for the most part acting in conformity to what their interests or fancies dictated.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Cleopatra
To most of them she spoke herself, as to the Ethiopians, Troglodytes, Hebrews, Arabians, Syrians, Medes, Parthians, and many others, whose language she had learnt.
Plt Antony Chapter 27: Cleopatra

Cleopatra
So she feigned to be dying for love of Antony, bringing her body down by slender diet;
Plt Antony Chapter 53: Octavia tries to visit Antony. Cleopatra defers a new war with Parthia

Cleopatra
So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress.
Plt Antony Chapter 10: Fulvia

Cleopatra
Those who had seen Cleopatra, whom they could report to have no way the advantage of Octavia either in youth or in beauty
Plt Antony Chapter 57: Antony and Cleopatra go to Athens

Cleopatra
For her actual beauty, it is said, was not in itself so remarkable that none could be compared with her, or that no one could see her without being struck by it, but the contact of her presence, if you lived with her, was irresistible; the attraction of her person, joining with the charm of her conversation, and the character that attended all she said or did, was something bewitching.
Plt Antony Chapter 27: Cleopatra

Cleopatra
In fine, they so melted and unmanned him, that, fully believing she would die if he forsook her, he put off the war and returned to Alexandria,
Plt Antony Chapter 53: Octavia tries to visit Antony. Cleopatra defers a new war with Parthia

Clodia
Clodia, a dissolute and wicked woman
Plt Lucullus Chapter 38: Lucullus withdraws from politics

Cloelia
The Romans rewarded the unprecedented courage shown by a woman by an unprecedented honour, namely an equestrian statue.
Hor Book II Chapter 13: The story of Cloelia.

Corbulo
To keep his soldiers free from sloth, he dug a canal of twenty-three miles in length between the Rhine and the Meuse, as a means of avoiding the uncertain perils of the ocean.
Ann Book XI Chapter 20: The Rhine - Meuse canal

Coriolan
His strength of body, which they said no resistance and no fatigue could exhaust.
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 2: An excellent soldier

Coriolan
Must it then be that, had I remained childless, no attack would have been made on Rome; had I never had a son, I should have ended my days a free woman in a free country?
Quote by Veturia
Hor Book II Chapter 40: Third war of Rome and Volscians. Veturia and Volumnia

Coriolan
The early loss of a father may be attended with other disadvantages, yet it can hinder none from being either virtuous or eminent in the world, and that it is no obstacle to true goodness and excellence;
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 1: His youth

Coriolan
For he had, what Cato thought a great point in a soldier, not only strength of hand and stroke, but also a voice and look that of themselves were a terror to an enemy.
Quote by Cato the Elder
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 8: Coriolanus conquers Corioli

Coriolan
whereas others made glory the end of their daring, the end of his glory was his mother's gladness
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 4: Debts of the plebs

Coriolan
He had never learned how essential it is for any one who undertakes public business, and desires to deal with mankind, to avoid above all things that self-will, which, as Plato says, belongs to the family of solitude; and to pursue, above all things, that capacity so generally ridiculed, of submission to ill treatment.
Quote by Plato
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 15: He is not chosen.

Cornelia
The young lady had other attractions besides those of youth and beauty; for she was highly educated, played well upon the lute, understood geometry, and had been accustomed to listen with profit to lectures on philosophy.
Plt Pompey Chapter 55: Pompey sole consul

Cornelius Laco
Titus Vinius and Cornelius Laco, one the most worthless, the other the most spiritless of mankind, were ruining the weak old Emperor,
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Cornelius Laco
Inimical to all measures, however excellent, which he did not originate, obstinately thwarted men wiser than himself.
His Book I Chapter 26: Revolt of Otho. The start

Cotys
Cotys having a gentle and kindly temper
Ann Book II Chapter 64: War in Thrace

Crassus
Cato was his friend and connection, but, nevertheless, so hated his life and habits, that when a young man in the senate made a long and tedious speech in praise of frugality and temperance, Cato got up and said, "How long do you mean to go on making money like Crassus, living like Lucullus, and talking like Cato?"
Plt Lucullus Chapter 40: A luxurious life for Lucullus (cont.)

Deiphobe
A frenzied prophetess, who from beneath the hollow scarped crag sings oracles, or characters on leaves mysterious names
Quote by Helenus
Vrg Book III Chapter 17: Prophecy of Helenus (cont.)

Diana
Then a cruel oracle ordered Agamemnon to sacrifice his innocent daughter, Iphigenia, to pitiless Diana.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 2: 60-142 Pythagoras' Teachings: Vegetarianism

Dicineus
He taught them almost the whole of philosophy, for he was a skilled master of this subject.
Gth Chapter 11: Dicineus.

Dicineus
He taught them logic and made them skilled in reasoning beyond all other races; he showed them practical knowledge and so persuaded them to abound in good works.
Gth Chapter 11: Dicineus.

Dicineus
By demonstrating theoretical knowledge he urged them to contemplate the twelve signs and the courses of the planets passing through them, and the whole of astronomy. He told them how the disc of the moon gains increase or suffers loss, and showed them how much the fiery globe of the sun exceeds in size our earthly planet. He explained the names of the three hundred and forty-six stars and told through what signs in the arching vault of the heavens they glide swiftly from their rising to their setting.
Gth Chapter 11: Dicineus.

Dido
Julia, of the family of the Caesars, who, for her discretion and fair behavior, was not inferior to any of her time.
Plt Antony Chapter 2: His mother, his youth

Diogenes
Diogenes, who, being told that some persons derided him, made answer, "But I am not derided," meaning that only those were really insulted on whom such insults made an impression.
Plt Fabius, Chapter 10: The army is divided

Domitian
With one continuous blow, drained the life-blood of the Common-wealth
Agr Chapter 44: Obituary of Agricola

Domitian
Sometimes he would have a slave stand at a distance and hold out the palm of his right hand for a mark, with the fingers spread; then he directed his arrows with such accuracy that they passed harmlessly between the fingers.
Stn Domitian, Chapter 19: Domitian as an archer

Domitian
a book "On the Care of the Hair," which he published
Stn Domitian, Chapter 18: His appearance

Domitian
He felt conscious that all men laughed at his late mock triumph over Germany, for which there had been purchased from traders people whose dress and hair might be made to resemble those of captives, whereas now a real and splendid victory, with the destruction of thousands of the enemy, was being celebrated with just applause.
Agr Chapter 39: Agricola in Britain. Considerations of Domitian

Domitian
Under a semblance of simple and modest tastes, he wrapped himself in a profound reserve, and affected a devotion to literature and a love of poetry, thus seeking to throw a veil over his character, and to withdraw himself from the jealousy of his brother, of whose milder temper, so unlike his own, he judged most falsely.
His Book IV Chapter 86: On Domitian

Domitian
With Domitian it was the chief part of our miseries to see and to be seen, to know that our sighs were being recorded, to have, ever ready to note the pallid looks of so many faces, that savage countenance reddened with the hue with which he defied shame.
Agr Chapter 45: What Agricola did not see

Domitian
A ruler who was the foe of virtue
Agr Chapter 41: Life in Rome

Domitian
He prohibited the castration of males, and kept down the price of the eunuchs that remained in the hands of the slave dealers
Stn Domitian, Chapter 7: His administration

Domitian
In his administration of the government he for some time showed himself inconsistent, with about an equal number of virtues and vices, but finally he turned the virtues also into vices;
Stn Domitian, Chapter 3: Domitian's first years as the emperor

Domitian
He himself, too, made a remarkable pretense of modesty and especially of an interest in poetry, an art which had previously been as unfamiliar to him as it was later despised and rejected, and he even gave readings in public.
Stn Domitian, Chapter 2: Domitian as a young man

Domitian
Having assumed the surname Germanicus after his two triumphs, he renamed the months of September and October from his own names, calling them "Germanicus" and "Domitianus," because in the former he had come to the throne and was born in the latter.
Stn Domitian, Chapter 13: Master and God

Domitius Corbulo
It was this same Corbulo, who, after raising a cry that most of the roads in Italy were obstructed or impassable through the dishonesty of contractors and the negligence of officials, himself willingly undertook the complete management of the business. This proved not so beneficial to the State as ruinous to many persons, whose property and credit he mercilessly attacked by convictions and confiscations.
Ann Book III Chapter 31: Contest of Sulla nd Corbulo

Dumnorix
Being unaccustomed to sailing, he feared the sea;
Ann Book V Chapter 7: The fall of Sejanus. Blaesus

Dumnorix
He had discovered him to be fond of change, fond of power, possessing great resolution, and great influence among the Gauls.
Quote by Julius Caesar
Ann Book V Chapter 6: The fall of Sejanus. Effects

Evander
He was looked up to with reverence for his knowledge of letters -- a new and marvellous thing for uncivilized men - but he was still more revered because of his mother, who was believed to be a divine being and regarded with wonder, by all as an interpreter of Fate, in the days before the arrival of the Sibyl in Italy.
Hor Book I Chapter 7: Death of Remus. The Legend of Hercules and Cacus.

Fabia the Younger
A woman easily excited by trifles.
Hor Book VI Chapter 34: The Licinian Laws.

Fabius Cunctator
Though the dictator persisted in his delay and sloth; measures condemned alike by the sentence of gods and men
Hor Book XXII Chapter 27: The army is divided.

Fabius Cunctator
It would be a long and uninteresting discussion if I were to follow the example of Quintus Fabius, and as he has depreciated my services in Spain, so I were to pour ridicule on his glory and extol my own. I will do neither the one nor the other, senators, and if, young as I am, I cannot have the advantage over an old man in anything else, I will at least prove his superior in moderation and restraint of language.
Quote by Scipio Africanus the Elder
Hor Book XXXVIII Chapter 44: Answer of Scipio (cont.)

Fabius Cunctator
Did not I tell you, that this cloud which always hovered upon the mountains would, at some time or other, come down with a storm upon us?"
Quote by Hannibal
Plt Fabius, Chapter 12: Minucius saved by Fabius

Falanius
Against Falanius it was alleged by his accuser that he had admitted among the votaries of Augustus, who in every great house were associated into a kind of brotherhood, one Cassius, a buffoon of infamous life, and that he had also in selling his gardens included in the sale a statue of Augustus.
Ann Book I Chapter 73: Prosecutions for Majestas. Falanius and Rubrius

Felix
Felix, who had for some time been governor of Judaea, and thought that he could do any evil act with impunity, backed up as he was by such power.
Ann Book XII Chapter 54: Problems in Judea

Felix
Antonius Felix, indulging in every kind of barbarity and lust, exercised the power of a king in the spirit of a slave.
His Book V Chapter 9: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Flavius Josephus
One of his highborn prisoners, Josephus by name, as he was being put in chains, declared most confidently that he would soon be released by the same man, who would then, however, be emperor.
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 5: Omens

Flavus
That brother, surnamed Flavus, was with our army, a man famous for his loyalty, and for having lost an eye by a wound, a few years ago, when Tiberius was in command.
Ann Book II Chapter 9: War with the Germans. Arminius and his brother.

Fonteius Capito
Capito, though foully stained with avarice and profligacy.
His Book I Chapter 7: Galba becomes emperor. Executions

Fortune
always had a dread of Fortune as faithless and inconstant
Quote by Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus
Plt Aemilius Chapter 35: Aemilius speaks of his ill fortune

Fulvia
Fulvia, ... a woman not born for spinning or housewifery, nor one that could be content with ruling a private husband, but prepared to govern a first magistrate, or give orders to a commander-in-chief.
Plt Antony Chapter 10: Fulvia

Fulvia
So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress.
Plt Antony Chapter 10: Fulvia

Furius Lucius Arruntius Scribonianus
But the characteristics most predominant in him were fear and distrust….When Camillus formed his plot against him, not doubting but his timidity might be worked upon without a war, he wrote to him a scurrilous, petulant, and threatening letter, desiring him to resign the government, and betake himself to a life of privacy. Upon receiving this requisition, he had some thoughts of complying with it, and summoned together the principal men of the city, to consult with them on the subject.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 35: Fear and distrust.

Gaius Asinius Gallus
… ambitious and incapable
Quote by Augustus
Ann Book I Chapter 13: The start of Tiberius(cont.)

Gaius Caesar
When Agrippa died, and Lucius Caesar as he was on his way to our armies in Spain and Gaius while returning from Armenia still suffering from a wound, were prematurely cut off by destiny, or by their step-mother Livia's treachery,
Ann Book I Chapter 3: Augustus' succession

Gaius Calpurnius Piso
That it mattered not as to the disgrace if a harp-player were removed and a tragic actor succeeded him.
Quote by Subrius Flavus
Ann Book XV Chapter 65: The conspiracy of Piso. Subrius Flavus

Gaius Calpurnius Piso
But Piso refused, alleging the odium of an act which would stain with an emperor's blood, however bad he might be, the sanctity of the hospitable board and the deities who preside over it.
Ann Book XV Chapter 52: The conspiracy of Piso. Plans

Gaius Cassius Longinus
Nor was Caesar without suspicions of him, and said once to his friends, "What do you think Cassius is aiming at? I don't like him, he looks so pale."
Plt Caesar Chapter 62: Caesar murdered; preliminaries

Gaius Cassius Longinus
And when it was told him that Antony and Dolabella were in a plot against him, he said he did not fear such fat, luxurious men, but rather the pale, lean fellows, meaning Cassius and Brutus
Plt Caesar Chapter 62: Caesar murdered; preliminaries

Gaius Cassius Longinus
It is not," said he, "these well fed, long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and the hungry looking;" meaning Brutus and Cassius.
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Antony Chapter 11: Caesar and Antony

Gaius Claudius Nero
A resolution was earned in the senate insisting upon their becoming reconciled to each other. Their quarrel was only too notorious, and was embittered by Livius' resentment at the insulting treatment he had received, for he felt that his honour had been sullied by his prosecution. This made him all the more implacable; he said that there was no need for any reconciliation, each would act with greater energy and alertness if he knew that failure to do so would give his enemy an advantage.
Hor Book XXVII Chapter 35: Marcus Livius and Claudius Nero reconciled

Gaius Fabius Valens
A man of foul and infamous character;
His Book II Chapter 30: Otho versus Vitellius. Caecina and Valens

Gaius Fabius Valens
… was so rapacious, that neither what he plundered from enemies nor what he stole or got as gifts and bribes from his friends and allies could satisfy his wishes.
Plt Otho Chapter 6: Otho versus Vitellius; the siege of Placentia

Gaius Fabius Valens
Poor for many years and suddenly growing rich, he could but ill conceal the change in his fortunes, indulging without moderation the appetites which a protracted poverty had inflamed, and, after a youth of indigence, becoming prodigal in old age.
His Book I Chapter 66: Revolt of Vitellius. Vienna

Gaius Fabius Valens
He was a man of loose character, but of no small ability, who sought to gain by profligacy a reputation for elegance. In the theatricals performed by young men during the reign of Nero, at first apparently from compulsion, afterwards of his own free choice, he repeatedly acted in the farces, with more cleverness than propriety.
His Book III Chapter 62: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Valens put to death

Gaius Flaminius Nepos
That they had created indeed two consuls, that they had but one; for what regular authority had the other, or what auspices? That their magistrates took these with them from home, from the tutelar deities of themselves and the state, after the celebration of the Latin holidays; the sacrifice upon the mountain being completed, and the vows duly offered up in the Capitol: that neither could an unofficial individual take the auspices, nor could one who had gone from home without them, take them new, and for the first time, in a foreign soil.
Hor Book XXII Chapter 1: A cold spring for Hannibal and bad omens for Rome

Gaius Flaminius Nepos
The consul was haughty from his former consulship, and felt no proper degree of reverence not only for the laws and the majesty of the fathers, but even for the gods
Hor Book XXII Chapter 3: Flaminius

Gaius Licinius Mucianus
In his youth he had cultivated with many intrigues the friendship of the great.
His Book I Chapter 10: Galba becomes emperor. The East

Gaius Licinius Mucianus
He was a compound of dissipation and energy, of arrogance and courtesy, of good and bad qualities. His self-indulgence was excessive, when he had leisure, yet whenever he had served, he had shown great qualities. In his public capacity he might be praised; his private life was in bad repute. Yet over subjects, friends, and colleagues, he exercised the influence of many fascinations.
His Book I Chapter 10: Galba becomes emperor. The East

Gaius Licinius Mucianus
Mucianus, with the perpetual assertion that money was the sinews of war,
His Book II Chapter 84: Revolt of Vespasian. Money

Gaius Licinius Mucianus
Mucianus, on the contrary, was eminent for his magnificence, for his wealth, and for a greatness that transcended in all respects the condition of a subject; readier of speech than the other, he thoroughly understood the arrangement and direction of civil business.
His Book II Chapter 5: Titus returns (cont.)

Gaius Musonius Rufus
One Musonius Rufus, a man of equestrian rank, strongly attached to the pursuit of philosophy and to the tenets of the Stoics, had joined the envoys. He mingled with the troops, and, enlarging on the blessings of peace and the perils of war, began to admonish the armed crowd. Many thought it ridiculous; more thought it tiresome; some were ready to throw him down and trample him under foot, had he not yielded to the warnings of the more orderly and the threats of others, and ceased to display his ill-timed wisdom.
His Book III Chapter 81: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Musonius Rufus

Gaius Papirius Carbo
he way, of Carbo, that as soon as he was brought to the place, and saw the sword drawn for execution, he was suddenly seized with a looseness or pain in his bowels, and desired a little respite of the executioner, and a convenient place to relieve himself.
Plt Pompey Chapter 10: Pompey on Sicily

Gaius Scribonius Curio
Curio, a man abandoned to his pleasures; who, to make Antony's dependence upon him a matter of greater necessity, plunged him into a life of drinking and dissipation, and led him through a course of such extravagance, that he ran, at that early age, into debt to the amount of two hundred and fifty talents.
Plt Antony Chapter 2: His mother, his youth

Gaius Silius
As for her, careless of concealment, she went continually with a numerous retinue to his house, she haunted his steps, showered on him wealth and honours, and, at last, as though empire had passed to another, the slaves, the freedmen, the very furniture of the emperor were to be seen in the possession of the paramour.
Ann Book XI Chapter 12: Messalina falls in love with Silius

Gaius Suetonius Paulinus
Excellent as he was in other respects, his policy to the conquered was arrogant, and exhibited the cruelty of one who was avenging private wrongs
Agr Chapter 16: Further problems in Britain. Boudicea

Gaius Suetonius Paulinus
A painstaking and judicious officer
Agr Chapter 5: In Britain

Gaius Terentius Varro
He asserted, "that Hannibal had been brought into Italy by the nobility, who had for many years been desirous of a war. That by the fraudulent machinations of the same persons the war had been protracted, whereas it might have been brought to a conclusion. That it had appeared that the war could be maintained with an army consisting of four legions in all, from Marcus Minucius's having fought with success in the absence of Fabius.
Hor Book XXII Chapter 34: Speech of Varro

Gaius Terentius Varro
That he wondered how any general, before he knew anything of his own army, or that of the enemy, the situation of the places, or the nature of the country, even now while in the city, and with the gown on, could tell what he must do when in arms, and could even foretell the day on which he would fight standard to standard with the enemy (said by Paulus)
Hor Book XXII Chapter 38: Start of the new consuls

Gaius Terentius Varro
For you are mistaken, Lucius Paulus, if you imagine that you will have a less violent contest with Gaius Terentius than with Hannibal
Hor Book XXII Chapter 39: Fabius speaks to Paulus

Gaius Terentius Varro
That he would bring the war to conclusion on the very day he got sight of the enemy
Hor Book XXII Chapter 38: Start of the new consuls

Galatea
More welcome than the summer shade, or the sun in winter,
Quote by Polyphemus
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 13: 479-546 The transformation of Hippolytus

Galba
The parsimonious old man.
His Book I Chapter 18: Galba looks for a successor. The army is informed

Galba
He was more inclined to unnatural desire, and in gratifying it preferred full-grown, strong men.
Stn Galba, Chapter 22: His habits

Galba
He had all the grants of Nero revoked, allowing only a tenth part to be retained; and he exacted repayment with the help of fifty Roman equites, stipulating that even if the actors and athletes had sold anything that had formerly been given them, it should be taken away from the purchasers, in case the recipient had spent the money and could not repay it.
Stn Galba, Chapter 15: Financial misbehaviour

Galba
It was thought too that he intended to limit the offices open to senators and equites to a period of two years, and to give them only to such as did not wish them and declined them.
Stn Galba, Chapter 15: Financial misbehaviour

Galba
Umbricius announced to him that the entrails had a sinister aspect, that treachery threatened him, that he had an enemy at home.
Quote by Umbricius
His Book I Chapter 27: Revolt of Otho. The next step

Galba
On another occasion when he was holding court and the question of the ownership of a beast of burden was laid before him, as the evidence on both sides was slight and the witnesses unreliable, so that it was difficult to get at the truth, he ruled that the beast should be led with its head muffled up to the pool where it was usually watered, that it should then be unmuffled, and should belong to the man to whom it returned of its own accord after drinking.
Stn Galba, Chapter 7: His career

Galba
He showed marked respect to Livia Augusta, to whose favor he owed great influence during her lifetime and by whose last will he almost became a rich man; for he had the largest bequest among her legatees, one of fifty million sesterces. But because the sum was designated in figures and not written out in words, Tiberius, who was her heir, reduced the bequest to five hundred thousand, and Galba never received even that amount.
Stn Galba, Chapter 5: Galba as husband and heir

Galba
Titus Vinius and Cornelius Laco, one the most worthless, the other the most spiritless of mankind, were ruining the weak old Emperor,
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Galba
About the actual murderer nothing is clearly known. Some have recorded the name of Terentius, an enrolled pensioner, others that of Lecanius; but it is the current report that one Camurius, a soldier of the 15th legion, completely severed his throat by treading his sword down upon it. The rest of the soldiers foully mutilated his arms and legs, for his breast was protected, and in their savage ferocity inflicted many wounds even on the headless trunk.
His Book I Chapter 41: Revolt of Otho. Galba murdered

Galba
The feebleness of Galba was notorious.
His Book I Chapter 12: Galba becomes emperor. Adoption?

Galba
A shudder comes over my soul, whenever I call to mind that ghastly entry, Galba's solitary victory, when, before the eyes of the capital he gave orders to decimate the prisoners, the suppliants, whom he had admitted to surrender. These were the auspices with which he entered the city. What is the glory that he has brought to the throne? None but that he has murdered Obultronius Sabinus and Cornelius Marcellus in Spain, Betuus Chilo in Gaul, Fonteius Capito in Germany, Clodius Macer in Africa, Cingonius on the high road, Turpilianus in the city, Nymphidius in the camp. What province, what camp in the world, but is stained with blood and foul with crime, or, as he expresses it himself, purified and chastened? For what others call crimes he calls reforms, and, by similar misnomers, he speaks of strictness instead of barbarity, of economy instead of avarice, while the cruelties and affronts inflicted upon you he calls discipline.
Quote by Otho
His Book I Chapter 37: Revolt of Otho. Speech of Otho

Galba
His double reputation for cruelty and avarice had gone before him;
Stn Galba, Chapter 12: Galba emperor (cont.)

Galba
The soldiery of the capital, who were imbued with the spirit of an old allegiance to the Caesars, and who had been led to desert Nero by intrigues and influences from without rather than by their own feelings, were inclined for change, when they found that the donative promised in Galba's name was withheld,
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Galba
To all this was added Galba's own expression, "I choose my soldiers, I do not buy them," noble words for the common-wealth, but fraught with peril for himself.
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Galba
His entry into the capital, made after the slaughter of thousands of unarmed soldiers, was most ill-omened, and was terrible even to the executioners.
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Galba
But the vulgar, ever eager to invent, had spread the report that he was sent for to be adopted. The advanced years and childless condition of the Emperor furnished matter for such gossip, and the country never can refrain from naming many persons until one be chosen.
His Book II Chapter 1: Titus returns

Galba
He was used to enlist and not to buy his soldiers,
Plt Galba Chapter 18: The soldiers begin to dislike Galba

Galba
As soon as this wrinkled, bald-headed man should be seen publicly at Rome, they would think it an utter disgrace ever to have had such a Caesar.
Quote by Mithridates of Bosporus
Plt Galba Chapter 13: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus (cont.)

Galba
He had Galba's property exposed to sale, which when Galba heard of he sequestered all that was Nero's in Spain, and found far readier bidders.
Plt Galba Chapter 5: Galba becomes emperor

Galba
He easily held the first place among the emperor's friends because of the similarity of their characters; but according to some, also through immoral relations.
Stn Otho, Chapter 2: His first years

Galba
Why, do you ask, in feigned honor does Otho in banishment languish? With his own wedded wife he had begun an intrigue.
Stn Otho, Chapter 3: Otho and Nero

Galba
You too, Galba, will some day have a taste of empire.
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book VI Chapter 20: Gaius Caesar

Galba
For he flatly declared that he could not keep on his feet unless he became emperor, and that it made no difference whether he fell at the hands of the enemy in battle or at those of his creditors in the Forum.
Stn Otho, Chapter 4: Otho and Galba

Galba
After the defeat, Otho at once resolved to take his own life, rather from a feeling of shame, as many have thought with good reason, and an unwillingness to persist in a struggle for imperial power at the expense of such danger to life and property, than from any despair of success or distrust of his troops;
Stn Otho, Chapter 9: Revolt of Vitellius (cont.)

Galba
Let us add this one more night to our life
Quote by Galba
Stn Otho, Chapter 11: Revolt of Vitellius. Suicide of Otho (cont.)

Galeria Fundana
Triaria's recklessness was rendered more intolerable by an immediate contrast with the exemplary virtue of Galeria, the Emperor's wife, who took no part in these horrors, and with Sextilia, the mother of the two Vitellii, a woman equally blameless, and of the old type of character.
His Book II Chapter 64: Vitellius emperor. Dolabella killed

Galvia Crispinilla
She had instructed Nero in profligacy, had passed over into Africa, that she might urge Macer into rebellion, and had openly attempted to bring a famine upon Rome.
His Book I Chapter 73: Galvia Crispinilla

Geiserik
Gaiseric ... was a man of moderate height and lame in consequence of a fall from his horse. He was a man of deep thought and few words, holding luxury in disdain, furious in his anger, greedy for gain, shrewd in winning over the barbarians and skilled in sowing the seeds of dissension to arouse enmity.
Gth Chapter 33: The Vandals.

Germanicus
He was indeed a young man of unaspiring temper, and of wonderful kindliness
Ann Book I Chapter 33: Revolt in Germania. Germanicus

Germanicus
Both had a graceful person and were of noble birth; neither had much exceeded thirty years of age, and both fell by the treachery of their own people in strange lands
Ann Book II Chapter 73: Illness and death of Germanicus. His funeral.

Germanicus
Do you think that I have acted my part on the stage of life well?
Stn Augustus, Chapter 99: His last words.

Germanicus
Foreign nations and kings grieved over him, so great was his courtesy to allies, his humanity to enemies.
Ann Book II Chapter 72: Illness and death of Germanicus. His death.

Germanicus
But Germanicus was gracious to his friends, temperate in his pleasures, the husband of one wife, with only legitimate children.
Ann Book II Chapter 73: Illness and death of Germanicus. His funeral.

Germanicus
His legs were too slender for the rest of his figure, but he gradually brought them to proper proportions by constant horseback riding after meals.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 2: Death of Germanicus

Germanicus
He had excelled Alexander in clemency, in self-restraint, and in all other virtues
Ann Book II Chapter 73: Illness and death of Germanicus. His funeral.

Germanicus
And that he might also soften the remembrance of the disaster by kindness, he went round to the wounded, applauded the feats of soldier after soldier, examined their wounds, raised the hopes of one, the ambition of another, and the spirits of all by his encouragement and interest, thus strengthening their ardour for himself and for battle.
Ann Book I Chapter 71: War with the Germans. The damage repaired

Germanicus
Piso was at the island of Cos when tidings reached him that Germanicus was dead. He received the news with extravagant joy, slew victims, visited the temples, with no moderation in his transports
Ann Book II Chapter 74: Martina sent to Rome.

Germanicus
None mourn more ostentatiously over the death of Germanicus than those who most rejoice at it
Ann Book II Chapter 77: Revolt of Piso. Advice of Celer.

Germanicus
One extolled his noble rank, another, his handsome person, nearly all of them, his endurance, his gracious manner and the evenness of his temper, whether he was jesting or was serious, while they acknowledged that they ought to repay him with their gratitude in battle
Ann Book II Chapter 13: War with the Germans. At night.

Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso
When he reached Syria and the legions, he began, by bribery and favouritism, to encourage the lowest of the common soldiers, removing the old centurions and the strict tribunes and assigning their places to creatures of his own or to the vilest of the men, while he allowed idleness in the camp, licentiousness in the towns, and the soldiers to roam through the country and take their pleasure.
Ann Book II Chapter 55: Germanicus goes East. Piso too.

Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso
Piso was at the island of Cos when tidings reached him that Germanicus was dead. He received the news with extravagant joy, slew victims, visited the temples, with no moderation in his transports
Ann Book II Chapter 74: Martina sent to Rome.

Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso
He appointed to it Cneius Piso, a man of violent temper, without an idea of obedience, with indeed a natural arrogance inherited from his father
Ann Book II Chapter 43: Germanicus goes East. Preparations.

Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
He it was of whom the orator Licinius Crassus said that it was not surprising that he had a brazen beard, since he had a face of iron and a heart of lead.
Quote by Lucius Licinius Crassus
Stn Nero, Chapter 2: Ancestry of Nero (cont.)

Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
A man hateful in every walk of life
Stn Nero, Chapter 5: Nero's father

Gnaeus Fulvius Flaccus
While Gnaeus Fulvius himself has no punishment inflicted upon him for running away, in a battle brought about by his own indiscretion; that he himself should be permitted to pass his old age in stews and brothels, where he passed his youth, while his troops, whose only crime was that they resembled their general, should be sent away in a manner into banishment, and suffer an ignominious service. So unequally," he said, "was liberty shared at Rome by the rich and the poor, by the ennobled and the common people."
Quote by Gaius Sempronius Blaesus
Hor Book XXV Chapter 2: Appointments

Gnaeus Pompeius Strabo
Never did the Romans give such demonstrations of a vehement and fierce hatred against any of their generals, as they did against Strabo, the father of Pompey
Plt Pompey Chapter 1: His father

Gracchus
But thou, 0 Roman, learn with sovereign sway To rule the nations. Thy great art shall be To keep the world in lasting peace, to spare humbled foe, and crush to earth the proud.
Quote by Anchises
Vrg Book VI Chapter 31: The future (cont.)

Hamilcar Barcas
It was obvious that he was revolving in his mind a greater war than he was then engaged in; and that if he had lived longer, the Carthaginians under Hamilcar would have carried the war into Italy
Hor Book XXI Chapter 2: Hasdrubal

Hamilcar Barcas
There is besides a story, that Hannibal, when about nine years old, while he boyishly coaxed his father Hamilcar that he might be taken to Spain, (at the time when the African war was completed, and he was employed in sacrificing previously to transporting his army thither,) was conducted to the altar; and, having laid his hand on the offerings, was bound by an oath to prove himself, as soon as he could, an enemy to the Roman people.
Hor Book XXI Chapter 1: Introduction and youth of Hannibal

Hannibal
There never was a genius more fitted for the two most opposite duties of obeying and commanding
Hor Book XXI Chapter 4: Hannibal's character

Hannibal
His fearlessness in encountering dangers, and his prudence when in the midst of them, were extreme. His body could not be exhausted, nor his mind subdued, by any toil. He could alike endure either heat or cold. The quantity of his food and drink was determined by the wants of nature, and not by pleasure
Hor Book XXI Chapter 4: Hannibal's character

Hannibal
Savage and ferocious from nature and habit, their general has rendered them still more so, by forming bridges and works with heaps of human bodies; and, what the tongue can scarcely utter, by teaching them to live on human flesh.
Quote by Gaius Terentius Varro
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 5: Speech of Terentius

Hannibal
There is besides a story, that Hannibal, when about nine years old, while he boyishly coaxed his father Hamilcar that he might be taken to Spain, (at the time when the African war was completed, and he was employed in sacrificing previously to transporting his army thither,) was conducted to the altar; and, having laid his hand on the offerings, was bound by an oath to prove himself, as soon as he could, an enemy to the Roman people.
Hor Book XXI Chapter 1: Introduction and youth of Hannibal

Hannibal
That of less importance was, that he was informed by one of his prisoners, that the very ground on which his camp stood was sold at this very time, without any diminution in its price. Indeed, so great an insult and indignity did it appear to him that a purchaser should be found at Rome for the very soil which he held and possessed by right of conquest, that he immediately called a crier, and ordered that the silversmiths' shops, which at that time stood around the Roman forum, should be put up for sale.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 11: The citadel is besieged

Hannibal
Excessive vices counterbalanced these high virtues of the hero; inhuman cruelty, more than Punic perfidy, no truth, no reverence for things sacred, no fear of the gods, no respect for oaths, no sense of religion.
Hor Book XXI Chapter 4: Hannibal's character

Hannibal
Hannibal himself … contracted a disorder in his eyes, at first from the unwholesomeness of the vernal air, which is attended with transitions from heat to cold; and at length from watching, nocturnal damps, the marshy atmosphere disordering his head, and because he had neither opportunity nor leisure for remedies, loses one of them.
Hor Book XXII Chapter 2: Hannibal marches through the Apennines

Hannibal
I am of opinion, that this youth should be kept at home, and taught, under the restraint of the laws and the authority of magistrates, to live on an equal footing with the rest of the citizens, lest at some time or other this small fire should kindle a vast conflagration."
Quote by Hanno
Hor Book XXI Chapter 3: Hannibal to succeed Hasdrubal

Hannibal
Will you be able to bear the look of Hannibal himself, which armed hosts cannot sustain, from which the Roman people shrink with horror?
Quote by Pacuvius Calavius
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 9: His father persuades him not to do it

Hannibal
Next the plans and temper of the consul, the situation of the country, the roads, the sources from which provisions might be obtained, and whatever else it was useful to know; all these things he ascertained by the most diligent inquiry
Hor Book XXII Chapter 3: Flaminius

Hanno
I am of opinion, that this youth should be kept at home, and taught, under the restraint of the laws and the authority of magistrates, to live on an equal footing with the rest of the citizens, lest at some time or other this small fire should kindle a vast conflagration."
Quote by Hanno
Hor Book XXI Chapter 3: Hannibal to succeed Hasdrubal

Hasdrubal
Hasdrubal openly avowed that "he admired Scipio more now that he had made his personal acquaintance than after his military successes, and he had no doubt that Syphax and his kingdom were already at the disposal of Rome, such skill did the Roman possess in winning men.
Hor Book XXXVIII Chapter 18: Scipio and Hasdrubal visit Syphax (cont.)

Hector
When a deputation from Ilium offered him somewhat belated condolences, he replied with a smile, as if the memory of his bereavement had faded from his mind, that they, too, had his sympathy for the loss of their eminent fellow-citizen Hector.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 52: Death of Germanicus and Drusus

Helen of Troy
Helen's hated beauty
Vrg Book II Chapter 25: Venus advises Aeneas

Helen of Troy
The caterpillars that are accustomed to weave their white cocoons, on uncultivated leaves (a thing observed by farmers) change to a butterfly's form, symbol of the soul.
Quote by Pythagoras of Samos
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Helen of Troy
This monster
Vrg Book II Chapter 24: Helen

Helen of Troy
Her hateful brow
Vrg Book II Chapter 24: Helen

Helvidius Priscus
As a citizen and as a senator, as a husband, as a son-in-law, as a friend, and in all the relations of life, he was ever the same, despising wealth, steadily tenacious of right, and undaunted by danger.
His Book IV Chapter 5: Helvidius Priscus

Hercules
Hercules was always very joyful when a vulture appeared to him upon any action.
Quote by Herodorus Ponticus
Plt Romulus, chapter 10: The Foundation of Rome (cont.)

Hercules
They have a tradition that Hercules also had been in their country, and him above all other heroes they extol in their songs when they advance to battle.
Ger Chapter 3: Hercules and Ulysses

Hercules
Hercules: a God that is not wont to regard the faint offerings of cowards, or to fulfill unsanctioned vows.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 18: Perseus leaves the battle-field

Hieron II
"That Hiero was a good man and an admirable ally, and that from the time he first formed a friendship with the Roman people he had uniformly cultivated a spirit of fidelity, and had munificently assisted the Roman cause at all times and in every place"
Hor Book XXII Chapter 37: Gifts from Syracusa

Homer
Plato, who excluded Homer from his ideal common-wealth.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 34: Caligula as a monster (Cont.)

Homer
as we read in Homer, that those should think themselves truly blessed to whom fortune has given an equal share of good and evil.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 33: A triumph for Aemilius (cont.)

Horace
A house is but a poor one, where the valuables unseen and unthought of do not exceed all those that meet the eye.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 39: A luxurious life for Lucullus

Horatia
"Go," he cried, in bitter reproach, "go to your betrothed with your ill-timed love, forgetful as you are of your dead brothers, of the one who still lives and of your country! So perish every Roman woman who mourns for an enemy!"
Hor Book I Chapter 26: Horatius' Murder of his Sister.

Horatius Cocles
The enemy were astounded at his preternatural courage.
Hor Book II Chapter 10: The Story of Horatius Cocles.

Hormus
All I can say is this, that neither in Antonius nor in Hormus would this foulest of crimes have been a degeneracy from the character of their former lives.
His Book III Chapter 28: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. The attack continues

Incitatus
Besides a stall of marble, a manger of ivory, purple blankets and a collar of precious stones he even gave this horse [Incitatus] a house, a troop of slaves and furniture, for the more elegant entertainment of the guests invited in his name; and it is also said that he planned to make him consul.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 55: Caligula and the circus.

Iphigenia
Then a cruel oracle ordered Agamemnon to sacrifice his innocent daughter, Iphigenia, to pitiless Diana.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 2: 60-142 Pythagoras' Teachings: Vegetarianism

Isis
that fickle superstition
Stn Domitian, Chapter 1: Domitian's youth

Januarius
In Athens, Anytus, the son of Anthemion, is said to have been the first that gave money to the judges, when on his trial, toward the latter end of the Peloponnesian war, for letting the fort of Pylos fall into the hands of the enemy.
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 14: Coriolanus candidate for the consulship

Jesus
Christus, from whom the name had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilatus
Ann Book XV Chapter 44: Prosecution of the Christians

Jesus
He banished from Rome all the Jews, who were continually making disturbances at the instigation of one Chrestus.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Julia Drusilla
his daughter's brains were dashed out against a wall.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 59: Death of Caligula. (Cont.)

Julia Drusilla
no evidence convinced him so positively that she was sprung from his own loins as her savage temper, which was even then so violent that she would try to scratch the faces and eyes of the little children who played with her.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 25: Caligula as a monster (Cont.)

Julia Procilla
A lady of singular virtue
Ann Book I Chapter 4: Augustus' succession(cont.)

Julia the Elder
(Tiberius) let her perish by a lingering death of destitution
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book I Chapter 53: Death of Julia and Gracchus

Julia the Elder
For her profligacy she had formerly been confined by her father Augustus in the island of Pandateria and then in the town of the Regini on the shores of the straits of Sicily.
Quote by Augustus
Ann Book I Chapter 53: Death of Julia and Gracchus

Julius Caesar
As he rode through the Velabrum on the day of his Gallic triumph, the axle of his chariot broke, and he was all but thrown out;
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 37: The Civil war, comment.

Julius Caesar
He answered, that they knew little who did not see more than one Marius in that boy
Quote by Sulla
Plt Caesar Chapter 1: Caesar and Sulla, Nicomedes and the pirates

Julius Caesar
he reformed the calendar, which the negligence of the pontiffs had long since so disordered, through their privilege of adding months or days at pleasure, that the harvest festivals did not come in summer nor those of the vintage in the autumn; and he adjusted the year to the sun's course by making it consist of three hundred and sixty-five days, abolishing the intercalary month, and adding one day every fourth year
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 40: Julius Caesar reforms the Calendar

Julius Caesar
Nor was Caesar without suspicions of him, and said once to his friends, "What do you think Cassius is aiming at? I don't like him, he looks so pale."
Plt Caesar Chapter 62: Caesar murdered; preliminaries

Julius Caesar
Yet he made so little of them, that when he had a mind to sleep, he would send to them, and order them to make no noise.
Plt Caesar Chapter 2: Caesar and the pirates

Julius Caesar
[he] reduced the number of those who received grain at public expense from three hundred and twenty thousand to one hundred and fifty thousand.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 41: Julius Caesar Dictator

Julius Caesar
After that he did not let slip any pretext for war, however unjust and dangerous it might be, picking quarrels as well with allied, as with hostile and barbarous nations
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 24: The Gallic War

Julius Caesar
In his pleadings at Rome, his eloquence soon obtained him great credit and favor,
Plt Caesar Chapter 4: Caesar as a lawyer

Julius Caesar
I came, I saw, I conquered, [' Veni, vidi, vici']
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 37: The Civil war, comment.

Julius Caesar
Look, that is the way to the enemy.
Plt Caesar Chapter 52: Civil war; Battle of Thapsus

Julius Caesar
Caesar left in the minds of some of his friends the suspicion that he did not wish to live longer and had taken no precautions, because of his failing health; and that therefore he neglected the warnings which came to him from portents and from the reports of his friends
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 86: Deliberations about his death.

Julius Caesar
The Divine Julius once quelled an army's mutiny with a single word by calling those who were renouncing their military obedience 'citizens.'
Quote by Germanicus
Ann Book I Chapter 42: Revolt in Germania. Speech of Germanicus

Julius Caesar
I came, saw, and conquered
Plt Caesar Chapter 50: War against Pharnaces. Battle of Zela

Julius Caesar
The die is cast
Plt Caesar Chapter 32: Julius Caesar crosses the Rubicon

Julius Caesar
He conferred citizenship on all who practiced medicine at Rome, and on all teachers of the liberal arts
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 42: Julius Caesar Dictator. Legislation.

Julius Caesar
Cicero was the first who had any suspicions of his designs upon the government, and, as a good pilot is apprehensive of a storm when the sea is most smiling, saw the designing temper of the man through this disguise of good-humor and affability, and said, that in general, in all he did and undertook, he detected the ambition for absolute power, "but when I see his hair so carefully arranged, and observe him adjusting it with one finger, I cannot imagine it should enter into such a man's thoughts to subvert the Roman state."
Plt Caesar Chapter 4: Caesar as a lawyer

Julius Caesar
The marshes and deep rivers were made passable to the Roman foot by the vast quantity of dead bodies.
Plt Caesar Chapter 20: War with the Belgae

Julius Caesar
Caesar replied, "I wished my wife to be not so much as suspected."
Plt Caesar Chapter 10: Clodius and Pompeia

Julius Caesar
Hence Considius, a very old man, took occasion one day to tell Caesar, that the senators did not meet because they were afraid of his soldiers. Caesar asked, "Why don't you then, out of the same fear, keep at home?" To which Considius replied, that age was his guard against fear, and that the small remains of his life were not worth much caution.
Quote by Considius
Plt Caesar Chapter 14: Caesar consul. Marriages

Julius Caesar
I go to meet an army without a leader, and I shall return to meet a leader without an army.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 34: The Civil war

Julius Caesar
Do you think," said he, "I have not just cause to weep, when I consider that Alexander at my age had conquered so many nations, and I have all this time done nothing that is memorable?"
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Caesar Chapter 11: Caesar in Spain. Caesar and Alexander the Great

Julius Caesar
he came to Gades, and noticing a statue of Alexander the Great in the temple of Hercules, he heaved a sigh, and as if out of patience with his own incapacity in having as yet done nothing noteworthy at a time of life when Alexander had already brought the world to his feet, he straightway asked for his discharge, to grasp the first opportunity for greater enterprises at Rome.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 7: Julius Caesar quastor in Spain

Julius Caesar
The die is cast [ Acta Alea Est].
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 32: Julius Caesar crosses the Rubicon. Civil war.

Julius Caesar
He merely uttered to those near him in Greek the words, "Anerriphtho kubos", (let the die be cast,) and led his army through it.
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Pompey Chapter 60: Civil war: Caesar crosses the Rubicon

Julius Caesar
Neither when in command of armies nor as a magistrate at Rome did he show a scrupulous integrity
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 54: Integrity.

Julius Caesar
In eloquence and in the art of war he either equalled or surpassed the fame of their most eminent representatives
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 55: Eloquence.

Julius Caesar
He rode a remarkable horse, too, with feet that were almost human; for its hoofs were cloven in such a way as to look like toes
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 61: His horse.

Julius Caesar
he put his baker in irons for serving him with one kind of bread and his guests with another
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 48: His household.

Julius Caesar
Of Trojan stock illustriously sprung, lo, Caesar comes! whose power the ocean bounds, whose fame, the skies. He shall receive the name Iulus nobly bore, great Julius, he.
Vrg Book I Chapter 18: The future: Romulus, Julius Caesar.

Julius Caesar
Caesar rivalled the greatest orators
Ann Book XIII Chapter 3: The funeral of Claudius

Julius Caesar
his baldness was a disfigurement which troubled him greatly,
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 45: His appearance.

Julius Caesar
It is not," said he, "these well fed, long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and the hungry looking;" meaning Brutus and Cassius.
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Antony Chapter 11: Caesar and Antony

Julius Caesar
to cut a canal through the Isthmus;
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 44: Julius Caesar Dictator. Public works.

Julius Caesar
There is a saying of Marcus Cato that Caesar was the only man who undertook to overthrow the state when sober
Quote by Cato the Younger
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 53: Eating and drinking habits

Julius Caesar
to open to the public the greatest possible libraries of Greek and Latin books,
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 44: Julius Caesar Dictator. Public works.

Julius Caesar
he seduced many illustrious women
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 50: Affairs with women.

Julius Caesar
Caesar and his army that had stormed a thousand towns, and subdued more than three hundred several nations; that had fought innumerable battles with the Germans and Gauls, and always carried the victory; that had taken a million of men prisoners, and slain as many upon the spot in pitched battles
Plt Pompey Chapter 67: Civil war: Pompey pursues Caesar

Julius Caesar
He denied the use of litters and the wearing of scarlet robes or pearls to all except to those of a designated position and age, and on set days.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 43: Julius Caesar Dictator. Justice.

Julius Caesar
The day before this assassination, he supped with Marcus Lepidus; and as he was signing some letters, according to his custom, as he reclined at table, there arose a question what sort of death was the best. At which he immediately, before anyone could speak, said, "A sudden one."
Plt Caesar Chapter 63: Caesar murdered, prodigies

Julius Caesar
No regard for religion ever turned him from any undertaking, or even delayed him.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 59: Religiosity.

Julius Caesar
From that time on Caesar managed all the affairs of state alone and after his own pleasure; so that sundry witty fellows, pretending by way of jest to sign and seal testamentary documents, wrote Done in the consulship of Julius and Caesar, instead of 'Bibulus and Caesar
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 20: Julius Caesar consul

Julius Caesar
He was highly skilled in arms and horsemanship, and of incredible powers of endurance
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 57: Endurance.

Julius Caesar
At the height of the public grief a throng of foreigners went about lamenting each after the fashion of his country, above all the Jews, who even flocked to the place for several successive nights.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 84: The funeral of Julius Caesar (cont.)

Julius Caesar
When he began the civil war every centurion of each legion proposed to supply a horseman from his own savings, and the soldiers one and all offered their service without pay and without rations, the richer assuming the care of the poorer
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 68: Military genius.

Julius Caesar
And when it was told him that Antony and Dolabella were in a plot against him, he said he did not fear such fat, luxurious men, but rather the pale, lean fellows, meaning Cassius and Brutus
Plt Caesar Chapter 62: Caesar murdered; preliminaries

Julius Caesar
He rode a remarkable horse, too, with feet that were almost human; for its hoofs were cloven in such a way as to look like toes.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 61: His horse.

Julius Caesar
When these men at first demanded of him twenty talents for his ransom, he laughed at them for not understanding the value of their prisoner, and voluntarily engaged to give them fifty.
Plt Caesar Chapter 2: Caesar and the pirates

Julius Civilis
Civilis had also thrown a dam obliquely across the Rhine, so that the stream, diverted by the obstacle, might overflow the adjacent country.
His Book V Chapter 14: The Batavian Uprise. Civilis at Castra Vetera

Julius Civilis
Julius Civilis, a man of commanding influence among the Batavi, was next rescued from like circumstances of peril, lest that high-spirited nation should be alienated by his execution.
His Book I Chapter 59: Revolt of Vitellius. Julius Civilis

Julius Civilis
Civilis, however, was naturally politic to a degree rarely found among barbarians.
His Book IV Chapter 13: The Batavian Uprise. Civilis feigns sympathy for Vespasian

Julius Classicus
Hardened though he was to every sort of crime,
His Book IV Chapter 59: The Batavian Uprise Vocula murdered

Junia Calvina
When Agrippa died, and Lucius Caesar as he was on his way to our armies in Spain and Gaius while returning from Armenia still suffering from a wound, were prematurely cut off by destiny, or by their step-mother Livia's treachery,
Ann Book I Chapter 3: Augustus' succession

Lausus
O son, he cried, was life to me so sweet, that I to save myself surrendered o'er my own begotten to a foeman's steel?
Quote by Mezentius
Vrg Book X Chapter 34: Lament of Mezentius

Lausus
Worthy he to serve a nobler sire, and happier far he had ne'er been born Mezentius' son.
Vrg Book VII Chapter 27: The army of Turnus: Mezentius

Livia
For she had gained such a hold on the aged Augustus that he drove out as an exile into the island of Planasia his only grandson, Agrippa Postumus
Ann Book I Chapter 3: Augustus' succession

Livia
Tiberius however, making no change in his voluptuous life, excused himself by letter for his absence from his last duty to his mother on the ground of the pressure of business. He even abridged, out of moderation, as it seemed, the honours which the Senate had voted on a lavish scale to her memory, allowing only a very few, and adding that no religious worship was to be decreed, this having been her own wish
Ann Book V Chapter 1: Death of Livia

Livia
Nine months for common births the Fates decree;
But, for the great, reduce the term to three.

Stn Claudius, Chapter 1: His ancestry: Drusus.

Livia
Terrible to the State as a mother, terrible to the house of the Caesars as a stepmother.
Ann Book I Chapter 10: The reign of Augustus(cont.)

Livia
Livia feeling a stepmother's bitterness towards Agrippina
Ann Book I Chapter 33: Revolt in Germania. Germanicus

Livia
The infirmities of Augustus increased, and some suspected guilt on his wife's part.
Ann Book I Chapter 5: The death of Augustus

Livia
He showed marked respect to Livia Augusta, to whose favor he owed great influence during her lifetime and by whose last will he almost became a rich man; for he had the largest bequest among her legatees, one of fifty million sesterces. But because the sum was designated in figures and not written out in words, Tiberius, who was her heir, reduced the bequest to five hundred thousand, and Galba never received even that amount.
Stn Galba, Chapter 5: Galba as husband and heir

Livia
When Agrippa died, and Lucius Caesar as he was on his way to our armies in Spain and Gaius while returning from Armenia still suffering from a wound, were prematurely cut off by destiny, or by their step-mother Livia's treachery,
Ann Book I Chapter 3: Augustus' succession

Livilla
She, the niece of Augustus, the daughter-in-law of Tiberius, the mother of children by Drusus, for a provincial paramour foully disgraced herself, her ancestors, and her descendants, giving up honour and a sure position for prospects as base as they were uncertain
Ann Book IV Chapter 3: Murder of Drusus. Preliminaries

Livilla
Assured that a woman after having parted with her virtue will hesitate at nothing, he lured her on to thoughts of marriage, of a share in sovereignty, and of her husband's destruction
Quote by Sejanus
Ann Book IV Chapter 3: Murder of Drusus. Preliminaries

Lucius Aemilius Paullus
For you are mistaken, Lucius Paulus, if you imagine that you will have a less violent contest with Gaius Terentius than with Hannibal
Hor Book XXII Chapter 39: Fabius speaks to Paulus

Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus
He only permitted his own sons , who were great lovers of learning, to take the king's books;
Plt Aemilius Chapter 27: Settling of Macedonia and Greece

Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus
He prayed for victory with his sword in his hand,
Plt Aemilius Chapter 18: Perseus leaves the battle-field

Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus
He always lived freely and generously on what he had, which was so far from being excessive, that after his death there was but barely enough left to answer his wife's dowry.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 3: Aemilius in Spain

Lucius Apronius
He flogged to death every tenth man drawn by lot from the disgraced cohort.
Ann Book III Chapter 21: War in Africa (Cont.)

Lucius Arruntius
Not unworthy of it, and, should the chance be given him, sure to make the venture
Quote by Augustus
Ann Book I Chapter 13: The start of Tiberius(cont.)

Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus
He was haughty, extravagant, and cruel
Stn Nero, Chapter 4: Nero's grandfather

Lucius Icilius
Lucius Icilius, who had been tribune, an active and energetic man whose courage had been proved in his battles for the plebs.
Hor Book III Chapter 44: The Story of Virginia

Lucius Salvius Otho Titianus
A man inclined to every species of greed
Agr Chapter 6: Marriage, Quaestor and Praetor

Lucius Tarquitius
Lucius Tarquitius, a member of a patrician house, but owing to his poverty he had served in the infantry, where he was considered by far the finest of the Roman soldiers.
Hor Book III Chapter 27: War with the Aequi and Sabines. (Cont.)

Lucius Vitellius
Lucius Vitellius, infamous as he was, had yet some energy, but it was not through his virtues, as is the case with the good, but through his vices, that he, like the worst of villains, was formidable.
His Book III Chapter 77: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Fall of Tarracina

Lucius Vitellius
Equally vicious with his brother …
His Book IV Chapter 2: Lucius Vitellius killed

Lucullus
Xerxes in a gown
Quote by Lucius Aelius Tubero
Plt Lucullus Chapter 39: A luxurious life for Lucullus

Lucullus
Finding the Cyrenians harassed by long tyrannies and wars, he composed their troubles, and settled their government; putting the city in mind of that saying which Plato once had oracularly uttered of them, who, being requested to prescribe laws to them, and mold them into some sound form of government, made answer, that it was a hard thing to give laws to the Cyrenians, abounding, as they did, in wealth and plenty. For nothing is more intractable than man when in felicity, nor anything more docile, when he has been reduced and humbled by fortune.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 2: Lucullus assists Sulla

Lucullus
He remembered the admonition of Sulla, whose advice it is in his Memoirs, to treat nothing as so certain and so worthy of reliance as an intimation given in dreams.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 23: Siege of Sinope

Lucullus
The first messenger that gave notice of Lucullus's coming was so far from pleasing Tigranes, that he had his head cut off for his pains; and no man daring to bring further information….
Plt Lucullus Chapter 25: Trigranes defeated.

Lucullus
I will make it a happy day to the Romans.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 27: Preparations for the battle of Tigranocerta

Lucullus
his mother Caecilia's reputation was bad
Plt Lucullus Chapter 1: His ancestry and youth

Lucullus
Being one of the rare examples of generals who made use of delay for active achievement, and speed for security.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 28: the battle of Tigranocerta

Lucullus
Cato was his friend and connection, but, nevertheless, so hated his life and habits, that when a young man in the senate made a long and tedious speech in praise of frugality and temperance, Cato got up and said, "How long do you mean to go on making money like Crassus, living like Lucullus, and talking like Cato?"
Plt Lucullus Chapter 40: A luxurious life for Lucullus (cont.)

Lucullus
Among the many signs of the great love which he bore to his brother Marcus, one in particular is commemorated by the Romans. Though he was elder brother, he would not step into authority without him, but deferred his own advance until his brother was qualified to bear a share with him, and so won upon the people, as when absent to be chosen Aedile with him.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 1: His ancestry and youth

Maharbal
Nay, rather, that you may know what has been achieved by this battle, five days hence you shall feast in triumph in the Capitol. Follow me: I will go first with the cavalry, that they may know that I am arrived before they know of me as approaching
Hor Book XXII Chapter 51: The battle-field.

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus
Able but contemptuously indifferent
Quote by Augustus
Ann Book I Chapter 13: The start of Tiberius(cont.)

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus
Is it not a most generous and worthy act, that the consulship should be given to Lepidus, the vilest of men, in preference to Catulus, the best and most deserving in the city, and all by your influence with the people?
Quote by Sulla
Plt Pompey Chapter 15: Sulla and Pompey

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus
Lepidus upon this being driven out of Italy, fled to Sardinia, where he fell sick and died of sorrow, not for his public misfortunes, as they say, but, upon the discovery of a letter, proving his wife to have been unfaithful to him.
Plt Pompey Chapter 16: Pompey and Lepidus

Marcus Antonius Creticus
A worthy, good man, and particularly remarkable for his liberality.
Plt Antony Chapter 1: His grandfather and his father.

Marcus Aquilius Regulus
As for you, the exile of your father, and the division of his property among his creditors, had left you perfectly safe, besides that your youth incapacitated you for office; there was nothing in you which Nero could either covet or dread. It was from sheer lust of slaughter and greed of gain that you, unknown as you were, you, who had never pleaded in any man's defence, steeped your soul in noble blood, when, though you had snatched from the very grave of your country the spoils of a man of consular rank, had been fed to the full with seven million sesterces, and shone with all sacerdotal honours, you yet overwhelmed in one common ruin innocent boys, old men of illustrious name, and noble ladies, when you actually blamed the tardy movements of Nero in wearying himself and his informers with the overthrow of single families, and declared that the whole Senate might be destroyed by one word.
His Book IV Chapter 42: Complot against Crassus and Orfitus

Marcus Calpurnius Bibulus
From that time on Caesar managed all the affairs of state alone and after his own pleasure; so that sundry witty fellows, pretending by way of jest to sign and seal testamentary documents, wrote Done in the consulship of Julius and Caesar, instead of 'Bibulus and Caesar
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 20: Julius Caesar consul

Marcus Claudius Marcellus
Marcellus was elected with the greatest unanimity, and was immediately to enter upon his office, but as it thundered while he entered upon it, the augurs were summoned, who pronounced that they considered the creation formal, and the fathers spread a report that the gods were displeased, because on that occasion, for the first time, two plebeians had been elected consuls.
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 31: Decisions are made

Marcus Hortalus
He had been induced by Augustus, on the strength of a gift of a million sesterces, to marry and rear children, that one of our most illustrious families might not become extinct
Ann Book II Chapter 37: Poor Hortalus.

Marcus Livius Salinator
A resolution was earned in the senate insisting upon their becoming reconciled to each other. Their quarrel was only too notorious, and was embittered by Livius' resentment at the insulting treatment he had received, for he felt that his honour had been sullied by his prosecution. This made him all the more implacable; he said that there was no need for any reconciliation, each would act with greater energy and alertness if he knew that failure to do so would give his enemy an advantage.
Hor Book XXVII Chapter 35: Marcus Livius and Claudius Nero reconciled

Marcus Livius Salinator
When on his departure Quintus Fabius warned him against giving battle before he knew the sort of enemy he had to meet, Livius is said to have replied that he would fight as soon as he caught sight of the enemy. When asked why he was in such a hurry he said: "Either I shall win special distinction from conquering such an enemy or a well-earned if not very honourable pleasure from the defeat of my fellow-citizens."
Hor Book XXVII Chapter 40: Hannibal in South-Italy

Marcus Lucullus
Among the many signs of the great love which he bore to his brother Marcus, one in particular is commemorated by the Romans. Though he was elder brother, he would not step into authority without him, but deferred his own advance until his brother was qualified to bear a share with him, and so won upon the people, as when absent to be chosen Aedile with him.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 1: His ancestry and youth

Marcus Minucius Rufus
That he, who had been sought out in their distress as the only general, and as a match for Hannibal; that he, an event which no record of history contains, was by the order of the people placed upon an equal footing with himself, -- a superior with an inferior officer, a dictator with a master of the horse, -- in that very city wherein the masters of the horse are wont to crouch and tremble at the rods and axes of the dictator
Hor Book XXII Chapter 27: The army is divided.

Marcus Piso Licinianus
A young man whose temper, naturally savage, has been rendered ferocious by prolonged exile
Quote by Otho
His Book I Chapter 21: Revolt of Otho

Marcus Posthumius Pyrgensis
As the state had taken upon itself the risk of any loss which might arise from storms to the commodities conveyed to the armies, not only had these two men fabricated false accounts of shipwrecks, but even those which had really occurred were occasioned by their own knavery, and not by accident. Their plan was to put a few goods of little value into old and shattered vessels, which they sank in the deep, taking up the sailors in boats prepared for the purpose, and then returning falsely the cargo as many times more valuable than it was.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 3: The Appointed people start their work. Posthumius charged.

Marcus Scribonius Libo Drusus
He often invited him to his table, showing no unfriendliness in his looks or anger in his words (so thoroughly had he concealed his resentment); and he wished to know all his saying and doings, though it was in his power to stop them
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book II Chapter 28: Prosecutions for Majestas. Libo Drusus (cont.)

Marcus Scribonius Libo Drusus
Who was thoughtless and an easy prey to delusions,
Ann Book II Chapter 27: Prosecutions for Majestas. Libo Drusus.

Marcus Scribonius Libo Drusus
When the accused denied this, it was decided that his slaves who recognised the writing should be examined by torture. As an ancient statute of the Senate forbade such inquiry in a case affecting a master's life, Tiberius, with his cleverness in devising new law, ordered Libo's slaves to be sold singly to the State-agent, so that, forsooth, without an infringement of the Senate's decree, Libo might be tried on their evidence.
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book II Chapter 30: Prosecutions for Majestas. Libo Drusus (cont.)

Marcus Scribonius Libo Drusus
Tiberius declared declared on oath that he would have interceded for his life, guilty though he was, but for his hasty suicide
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book II Chapter 31: Prosecutions for Majestas. Libo Drusus (cont.)

Marcus Vettius Bolanus
An upright man, whom no misdeeds made odious.
Agr Chapter 16: Further problems in Britain. Boudicea

Mark Antony
So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress.
Plt Antony Chapter 10: Fulvia

Mark Antony
It is related that, drinking all night at the wedding of Hippias, the comedian, on the morning, having to harangue the people, he came forward, overcharged as he was, and vomited before them all.
Plt Antony Chapter 9: In Rome

Mark Antony
It is not," said he, "these well fed, long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and the hungry looking;" meaning Brutus and Cassius.
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Antony Chapter 11: Caesar and Antony

Mark Antony
He had also a very good and noble appearance; his beard was well grown, his forehead large, and his nose aquiline, giving him altogether a bold, masculine look, that reminded people of the faces of Hercules in paintings and sculptures.
Plt Antony Chapter 4: Good-looking and generous

Mark Antony
In all the great and frequent skirmishes and battles, he gave continual proofs of his personal valor and military conduct;
Plt Antony Chapter 3: In Judea and Egypt

Mark Antony
And when it was told him that Antony and Dolabella were in a plot against him, he said he did not fear such fat, luxurious men, but rather the pale, lean fellows, meaning Cassius and Brutus
Plt Caesar Chapter 62: Caesar murdered; preliminaries

Mark Antony
Everybody concurred in promoting this new alliance, fully expecting that with the beauty, honor, and prudence of Octavia, when her company should, as it was certain it would, have engaged his affections, all would be kept in the safe and happy course of friendship.
Plt Antony Chapter 31: Antony marries Octavia

Mark Antony
Antony grew up a very beautiful youth
Plt Antony Chapter 2: His mother, his youth

Mark Antony
Curio, a man abandoned to his pleasures; who, to make Antony's dependence upon him a matter of greater necessity, plunged him into a life of drinking and dissipation, and led him through a course of such extravagance, that he ran, at that early age, into debt to the amount of two hundred and fifty talents.
Plt Antony Chapter 2: His mother, his youth

Mark Antony
What was once said as a jest, that the soul of a lover lives in someone else's body, he proved to be a serious truth.
Plt Antony Chapter 66: Cleopatra flees, Antony follows her

Mark Antony
… his having chariots drawn by lions …
Plt Antony Chapter 9: In Rome

Mark Antony
And his generous ways, his open and lavish hand in gifts and favors to his friends and fellow-soldiers, did a great deal for him in his first advance to power
Plt Antony Chapter 4: Good-looking and generous

Mark Antony
So she feigned to be dying for love of Antony, bringing her body down by slender diet;
Plt Antony Chapter 53: Octavia tries to visit Antony. Cleopatra defers a new war with Parthia

Mark Antony
In fine, they so melted and unmanned him, that, fully believing she would die if he forsook her, he put off the war and returned to Alexandria,
Plt Antony Chapter 53: Octavia tries to visit Antony. Cleopatra defers a new war with Parthia

Mark Antony
"If you can take two yearly tributes, you can doubtless give us a couple of summers, and a double harvest time;" and put it to him in the plainest and boldest way, that Asia had raised two hundred thousand talents for his service: "If this has not been paid to you, ask your collectors for it; if it has, and is all gone, we are ruined men."
Quote by Hybreas
Plt Antony Chapter 24: Antony in Asia

Marobodus
As for Maroboduus, he called him a fugitive, who had no experience of battles, who had sheltered himself in the recesses of the Hercynian Forest and then with presents and embassies sued for a treaty; a traitor to his country, a satellite of Caesar, who deserved to be driven out, with rage as furious as that with which they had slain Quintilius Varus.
Quote by Arminius
Ann Book II Chapter 45: War with the Germans. Maroboduus and Arminius.

Maximinus Thrax
For his stature, it is said, was more than eight feet
Gth Chapter 15: Maximinus.

Melchisedek
3 Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life
Nwt Letter to the Hebrews Chapter 7

Messalina
Then for the first time she understood her fate and put her hand to a dagger. In her terror she was applying it ineffectually to her throat and breast, when a blow from the tribune drove it through her
Ann Book XI Chapter 38: Death of Messalina

Messalina
As for her, careless of concealment, she went continually with a numerous retinue to his house, she haunted his steps, showered on him wealth and honours, and, at last, as though empire had passed to another, the slaves, the freedmen, the very furniture of the emperor were to be seen in the possession of the paramour.
Ann Book XI Chapter 12: Messalina falls in love with Silius

Metrodorus of Scepsis
Tigranes asked him, "what would you, Metrodorus, advise me to in this affair?" In return to which, either out of good-will to Tigranes, or a want of solicitude for Mithridates, he made answer, that as ambassador he counseled him to it, but as a friend dissuaded him from it.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 22: Administration of Asia

Mettius Fufetius
The Alban general showed as little courage as fidelity
Hor Book I Chapter 27: The treachery of Mettius Fufetius.

Mezentius
Worthy he to serve a nobler sire, and happier far he had ne'er been born Mezentius' son.
Vrg Book VII Chapter 27: The army of Turnus: Mezentius

Mezentius
Mezentius, scornful rebel against Heaven,
Vrg Book VII Chapter 27: The army of Turnus: Mezentius

Mithridates of Bosporus
Even the sons of Mithridates were butchered for having shed tears over their parent's murder.
Ann Book XII Chapter 47: War between Armenia and Iberia (cont.)

Mithridates VI
This latter was the most celebrated among the Greeks, because she so long withstood the king in his courtship to her, though he presented her with fifteen thousand pieces of gold, until a covenant of marriage was made, and a crown was sent her, and she was saluted queen.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 18: Death of the family of Mithridate

Monime of Miletus
And when Bacchides came and bade them prepare for death, as everyone thought most easy and painless, she took the diadem from her head, and fastening the string to her neck, suspended herself with it; which soon breaking, "O wretched headband!" said she, "not able to help me even in this small thing!" And throwing it away she spat on it, and offered her throat to Bacchides.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 18: Death of the family of Mithridate

Monime of Miletus
This latter was the most celebrated among the Greeks, because she so long withstood the king in his courtship to her, though he presented her with fifteen thousand pieces of gold, until a covenant of marriage was made, and a crown was sent her, and she was saluted queen.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 18: Death of the family of Mithridate

Moses
Moyses, wishing to secure for the future his authority over the nation, gave them a novel form of worship, opposed to all that is practised by other men.
His Book V Chapter 4: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus

Moses
Most writers, however, agree in stating that once a disease, which horribly disfigured the body, broke out over Egypt; that king Bocchoris, seeking a remedy, consulted the oracle of Hammon, and was bidden to cleanse his realm, and to convey into some foreign land this race detested by the gods. The people, who had been collected after diligent search, finding themselves left in a desert, sat for the most part in a stupor of grief, till one of the exiles, Moyses by name, warned them not to look for any relief from God or man, forsaken as they were of both, but to trust to themselves, taking for their heaven-sent leader that man who should first help them to be quit of their present misery.
His Book V Chapter 3: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Neoptolemus
Achilles, thy pretended sire
Quote by Priam
Vrg Book II Chapter 22: Death of Priam

Neoptolemus
He glittered like some swollen viper, fed on poison-leaves, whom chilling winter shelters underground, till, fresh and strong, he sheds his annual scales and, crawling forth rejuvenate, uncoils his slimy length
Quote by Aeneas
Vrg Book II Chapter 20: Pyrrhus

Nero
Poppaea died from a casual outburst of rage in her husband, who felled her with a kick when she was pregnant.
Ann Book XVI Chapter 6: Death of Poppaea

Nero
What an artist the world is losing
Quote by Nero
Stn Nero, Chapter 49: Suicide of Nero

Nero
It also had not failed of notice that the last piece which he sang in public was " Oedipus in Exile," and that he ended with the line: "Wife, father, mother, drive me to my death."
Quote by Nero
Stn Nero, Chapter 46: Omens

Nero
A humble art affords us daily bread.
Quote by Nero
Stn Nero, Chapter 40: Insurrection of Vindex

Nero
First, he recited a poem on the stage; then, at the importunate request of the rabble that he would make public property of all his accomplishments (these were their words), he entered the theatre, and conformed to all the laws of harp-playing, not sitting down when tired, nor wiping off the perspiration with anything but the garment he wore, or letting himself be seen to spit or clear his nostrils. Last of all, on bended knee he saluted the assembly with a motion of the hand, and awaited the verdict of the judges with pretended anxiety.
Ann Book XVI Chapter 4: Nero gets prizes

Nero
Consequently, to get rid of the report, Nero fastened the guilt and the most exquisite tortures on a class hated for their abominations, called Christians by the populace. Christus, from whom the name had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilatus, and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment, again broke out not only in Judaea, the first source of the evil, but even in Rome, where all things hideous and shameful from every part of the world find their centre and become popular. Accordingly, an arrest was first made of all who pleaded guilty; then, upon their information, an immense multitude was convicted, not so much of the crime of firing the city, as of hatred against mankind. Mockery of every sort was added to their deaths. Covered with the skins of beasts, they were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt, to serve as a nightly illumination, when daylight had expired.
Ann Book XV Chapter 44: Prosecution of the Christians

Nero
Punishment was inflicted on the Christians, a class of men given to a new and mischievous superstition.
Stn Nero, Chapter 16: Punishment of abuses

Nero
Nero, the same year, established a gymnasium, where oil was furnished to knights and senators after the lax fashion of the Greeks
Ann Book XIV Chapter 47: Death of Memmius Regulus

Nero
The emperor thought nothing charming or elegant in luxury unless Petronius had expressed to him his approval of it
Ann Book XVI Chapter 18: Death of Petronius

Nero
He read his poems too, not only at home but in the theatre as well, so greatly to the delight of all that a thanksgiving was voted because of his recital, while that part of his poems was inscribed in letters of gold and dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus.
Stn Nero, Chapter 10: His first actions (cont.)

Nero
Nothing that was not abominable and a public bane could be born of Agrippina and himself.
Quote by Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus
Stn Nero, Chapter 6: The youth of Nero

Nero
There was a story that Vespasian was insulted by Phoebus, a freedman, for closing his eyes in a doze, and that having with difficulty been screened by the intercessions of the well disposed, he escaped imminent destruction through his grander destiny.
Ann Book XVI Chapter 5: Danger of a performance. Vespasian

Nero
Rome was wasted by conflagrations, its oldest temples consumed, and the Capitol itself fired by the hands of citizens. Sacred rites were profaned; there was profligacy in the highest ranks; the sea was crowded with exiles, and its rocks polluted with bloody deeds. In the capital there were yet worse horrors. Nobility, wealth, the refusal or the acceptance of office, were grounds for accusation, and virtue ensured destruction. The rewards of the informers were no less odious than their crimes; for while some seized on consulships and priestly offices, as their share of the spoil, others on procuratorships, and posts of more confidential authority, they robbed and ruined in every direction amid universal hatred and terror. Slaves were bribed to turn against their masters, and freedmen to betray their patrons; and those who had not an enemy were destroyed by friends.
His Book I Chapter 2: Introduction (cont.)

Nero
A yet keener impulse urged Nero to show himself frequently on the public stage. Hitherto he had sung in private houses or gardenss, during the juvenile games, but these he now despised, as being but little frequented, and on too small a scale for so fine a voice.
Ann Book XV Chapter 33: Nero as an artist

Nero
Questioned by Nero as to the motives which had led him on to forget his oath of allegiance, "I hated you," he replied; "yet not a soldier was more loyal to you while you deserved to be loved. I began to hate you when you became the murderer of your mother and your wife, a charioteer, an actor, and an incendiary.
Ann Book XV Chapter 67: The conspiracy of Piso. Death of Subrius Flavus

Nero
Nero however, that he might not be known only for his accomplishments as an actor, also affected a taste for poetry, and drew round him persons who had some skill in such compositions, but not yet generally recognised.
Ann Book XIV Chapter 14: Nero as an artist

Nero
He had long had a fancy for driving a four-horse chariot, and a no less degrading taste for singing to the harp, in a theatrical fashion, when he was at dinner.
Ann Book XIV Chapter 14: Nero as an artist

Nero
Many years before Agrippina had anticipated this end for herself and had spurned the thought. For when she consulted the astrologers about Nero, they replied that he would be emperor and kill his mother. Let him kill her, she said, provided he is emperor.
Ann Book XIV Chapter 9: The Murder of Agrippina Minor. Her funeral

Nero
Hark, now strikes on my ear the trampling of swift-footed coursers!
Stn Nero, Chapter 49: Suicide of Nero

Nero
They say that a lion had been specially trained for him to kill naked in the arena of the amphitheatre before all the people, with a club or by the clasp of his arms
Stn Nero, Chapter 53: A craze for popularity

Nero
Cluvius relates that Agrippina in her eagerness to retain her influence went so far that more than once at midday, when Nero, even at that hour, was flushed with wine and feasting, she presented herself attractively attired to her half intoxicated son and offered him her person
Ann Book XIV Chapter 2: The Murder of Agrippina Minor. She tries to seduce Nero

Nero
Nero, who in a slave's disguise, so as to be unrecognized, would wander through the streets of Rome, to brothels and taverns, with comrades, who seized on goods exposed for sale and inflicted wounds on any whom they encountered, some of these last knowing him so little that he even received blows himself, and showed the marks of them in his face.
Ann Book XIII Chapter 25: Nero's vices

Nero
Did not gaze upon the atrocities which he ordered;
Agr Chapter 45: What Agricola did not see

Nero
Nero was the first emperor who needed another man's eloquence.
Ann Book XIII Chapter 3: The funeral of Claudius

Nero
He had Galba's property exposed to sale, which when Galba heard of he sequestered all that was Nero's in Spain, and found far readier bidders.
Plt Galba Chapter 5: Galba becomes emperor

Nero
A rumour had gone forth everywhere that, at the very time when the city was in flames, the emperor appeared on a private stage and sang of the destruction of Troy, comparing present misfortunes with the calamities of antiquity.
Ann Book XV Chapter 39: Fire in Rome. Nero sings

Nero
That it mattered not as to the disgrace if a harp-player were removed and a tragic actor succeeded him.
Quote by Subrius Flavus
Ann Book XV Chapter 65: The conspiracy of Piso. Subrius Flavus

Nero Claudius Drusus
He made likewise some prodigious canals beyond the Rhine, which to this day are called by his name.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 1: His ancestry: Drusus.

Nero Claudius Drusus
Nine months for common births the Fates decree;
But, for the great, reduce the term to three.

Stn Claudius, Chapter 1: His ancestry: Drusus.

Numa
Every alteration of a man's life is dangerous to him; but madness only could induce one who needs nothing and is satisfied with everything to quit a life he is accustomed to
Plt Numa, chapter 5: Election of Numa as king. He needs persuation

Numa
Numa, calculating the difference between the lunar and the solar' year at eleven days, for that the moon completed her anniversary course in three hundred and fifty-four days, and the sun in three hundred and sixty-five, to remedy this incongruity doubled the eleven days, and every other year added an intercalary month, to follow February, consisting of twenty-two days, and called by the Romans the month Mercedinus.
Plt Numa, chapter 18: Calendar reforms by Numa

Numa
The sole and only hope of respite or remedy for human evils was in some happy conjunction of events, which should unite in a single person the power of a king and the wisdom of a philosopher,
Plt Numa, chapter 20: No war during the reign of Numa.

Numa
So Numa forbade the Romans to represent God in the form of man or beast, nor was there any painted or graven image of a deity admitted amongst them for the space of the first hundred and seventy years, all which time their temples and chapels were kept free and pure from images
Plt Numa, chapter 8: Religious reforms by Numa

Numa
The removal of all danger from without would induce his subjects to luxuriate in idleness, as they would be no longer restrained by the fear of an enemy or by military discipline. To prevent this, he strove to inculcate in their minds the fear of the gods, regarding this as the most powerful influence which could act upon an uncivilised and, in those ages, a barbarous people. But, as this would fail to make a deep impression without some claim to supernatural wisdom, he pretended that he had nocturnal interviews with the nymph Egeria: that it was on her advice that he was instituting the ritual most acceptable to the gods and appointing for each deity his own special priests.
Hor Book I Chapter 19: Numa's Religious Institutions.

Numa
First of all he divided the year into twelve months, corresponding to the moon's revolutions. But as the moon does not complete thirty days in each month, and so there are fewer days in the lunar year than in that measured by the course of the sun, he interpolated intercalary months and so arranged them that every twentieth year the days should coincide with the same position of the sun as when they started, the whole twenty years being thus complete.
Hor Book I Chapter 19: Numa's Religious Institutions.

Numa
Look, who is he I may discern from far By olive-branch and holy emblems known? His flowing locks and hoary beard, behold!
Quote by Anchises
Vrg Book VI Chapter 31: The future (cont.)

Numa
He is also much to be commended for the repeal, or rather amendment, of that law which gives power to fathers to sell their children; he exempted such as were married, conditionally that it had been with the liking and consent of their parents
Plt Numa, chapter 17: Other regulations (cont.)

Occia
Occia, who for fifty-seven years had presided with the most immaculate virtue over the Vestal worship
Ann Book II Chapter 86: A new Vestal Virgin.

Octavia
She was then tightly bound with cords, and the veins of every limb were opened; but as her blood was congealed by terror and flowed too slowly, she was killed outright by the steam of an intensely hot bath. To this was added the yet more appalling horror of Poppaea beholding the severed head which was conveyed to Rome. And for all this offerings were voted to the temples
Ann Book XIV Chapter 63: Divorce and murder of Octavia. Octavia banished

Octavia
Then he confined her in the island of Pandataria. No exile ever filled the eyes of beholders with tears of greater compassion
Ann Book XIV Chapter 63: Divorce and murder of Octavia. Octavia banished

Octavia the Younger
Those who had seen Cleopatra, whom they could report to have no way the advantage of Octavia either in youth or in beauty
Plt Antony Chapter 57: Antony and Cleopatra go to Athens

Octavia the Younger
This sister, Octavia, he was extremely attached to, as, indeed, she was, it is said, quite a wonder of a woman.
Plt Antony Chapter 31: Antony marries Octavia

Octavia the Younger
Everybody concurred in promoting this new alliance, fully expecting that with the beauty, honor, and prudence of Octavia, when her company should, as it was certain it would, have engaged his affections, all would be kept in the safe and happy course of friendship.
Plt Antony Chapter 31: Antony marries Octavia

Orgetorix
He, incited by lust of sovereignty, formed a conspiracy among the nobility, and persuaded the people to go forth from their territories with all their possessions, [saying] that it would be very easy, since they excelled all in valor, to acquire the supremacy of the whole of Gaul
Dbg Book I Chapter 2: The conspiration of Orgetorix About the Helvetii.

Otho
The astrologers also urged him to action, predicting from their observation of the heavens revolutions, and a year of glory for Otho
His Book I Chapter 22: Revolt of Otho. Predictions

Otho
Otho, with his profligacy, his cruelty, and his recklessness, was held to be more dangerous to the common-wealth
His Book II Chapter 31: Otho versus Vitellius. The strategy of Otho

Otho
I hold that to expose such a spirit, such a courage as yours, to any further risk is to put too high a value on my life. The more hope you hold out to me, should I choose to live, the more glorious will be my death. Fortune and I now know each other; you need not reckon for how long, for it is peculiarly difficult to be moderate with that prosperity which you think you will not long enjoy. The civil war began with Vitellius; he was the first cause of our contending in arms for the throne; the example of not contending more than once shall belong to me. By this let posterity judge of Otho.
His Book II Chapter 47: Otho versus Vitellius. Otho decides for suicide

Otho
Prayers for either would be impious, vows for either a blasphemy, when from their conflict you can only learn that the conqueror must be the worse of the two
His Book I Chapter 50: Revolt of Vitellius

Otho
At dawn he fell with his breast upon the steel.
His Book II Chapter 49: Otho versus Vitellius. Death of Otho

Otho
Otho had long been courting the affections of the soldiery, either in the hope of succeeding to the throne, or in preparation for some desperate act. On the march, on parade, and in their quarters, he would address all the oldest soldiers by name, and in allusion to the progresses of Nero would call them his messmates. Some he would recognise, he would inquire after others, and would help them with his money and interest. He would often intersperse his conversation with complaints and insinuations against Galba and anything else that might excite the vulgar mind.
His Book I Chapter 23: Revolt of Otho. Preparations

Otho
In Otho's army the generals were full of fear, and the soldiers hated their officers;
His Book II Chapter 41: Otho versus Vitellius. Preliminary skirmishes

Otho
The vices, of which alone he boasts, overthrew the empire, even when he was but the Emperor's friend. Shall he earn that empire now by his manner and his gait, or by those womanish adornments? They are deceived, on whom luxury imposes by its false show of liberality; he will know how to squander, he will not know how to give. Already he is thinking of debaucheries, of revels, of tribes of mistresses.
Quote by Marcus Piso Licinianus
His Book I Chapter 30: Revolt of Otho. Piso continues

Otho
That two men, who for shamelessness, indolence, and profligacy, were the most worthless of mortals, had been selected, it would seem, by some fatality to ruin the empire, became the open complaint, not only of the Senate and the Knights, who had some stake and interest in the country, but even of the common people.
His Book I Chapter 50: Revolt of Vitellius

Otho
For Otho's had been a neglected boyhood and a riotous youth, and he had made himself agreeable to Nero by emulating his profligacy.
His Book I Chapter 13: Galba looks for a successor

Otho
Many of the soldiers favoured him, and the court was biassed in his favour, because he resembled Nero.
His Book I Chapter 13: Galba looks for a successor

Otho
Meanwhile Otho, to the surprise of all, was not sinking down into luxury and sloth
His Book I Chapter 71: Celsus

Otho
In the midst of these measures,... and by a decree of the Senate restored the statues of Poppaea.
His Book I Chapter 78: Revolt of Vitellius. Bribery of Otho

Otho
One of them, Ptolemaeus, had attended Otho in Spain, and had there foretold that his patron would survive Nero.
His Book I Chapter 22: Revolt of Otho. Predictions

Paul
24 … much learning doth make thee mad.
Quote by Marcus Porcius Festus
Nwt Acts chapter 26

Perolla
Will you be able to bear the look of Hannibal himself, which armed hosts cannot sustain, from which the Roman people shrink with horror?
Quote by Pacuvius Calavius
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 9: His father persuades him not to do it

Perpenna Vento
For Perpenna, having in his custody all Sertorius's papers, offered to produce several letters from the greatest men in Rome, who, desirous of a change and subversion of the government, had invited Sertorius into Italy. And Pompey, fearing that these might be the occasion of worse wars than those which were now ended, thought it advisable to put Perpenna to death, and burnt the letters without reading them.
Plt Pompey Chapter 20: Sertrius murdered; Pompey defeats Perpenna.

Petronius
The emperor thought nothing charming or elegant in luxury unless Petronius had expressed to him his approval of it
Ann Book XVI Chapter 18: Death of Petronius

Phaedra
Accursed step-mother.
Quote by Hippolytus
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 12: 453-478 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Sanctity of Life

Philip the Arab
Philip -- who, with his son Philip, was the only Christian emperor before Constantine
Gth Chapter 15: Maximinus.

Philip V
It was a dangerous thing for husbands and fathers to place obstacles in the way of the king's lusts by any untimely scruples on their part.
Hor Book XXVII Chapter 31: Further activities of Philip V (cont.)

Plancina
Plancina 's insolence increased, and she then for the first time exchanged for the gayest attire the mourning she had worn for her lost sister.
Ann Book II Chapter 74: Martina sent to Rome.

Plato
Plato, who excluded Homer from his ideal common-wealth.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 34: Caligula as a monster (Cont.)

Plato
Finding the Cyrenians harassed by long tyrannies and wars, he composed their troubles, and settled their government; putting the city in mind of that saying which Plato once had oracularly uttered of them, who, being requested to prescribe laws to them, and mold them into some sound form of government, made answer, that it was a hard thing to give laws to the Cyrenians, abounding, as they did, in wealth and plenty. For nothing is more intractable than man when in felicity, nor anything more docile, when he has been reduced and humbled by fortune.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 2: Lucullus assists Sulla

Polymestor
He scorned all honor and did murder foul
Vrg Book III Chapter 3: Polymestor and Polydorus

Polyphemus
Now Polyphemus, you care for your appearance, and are anxious to please, now you comb your bristling hair with a rake, and are pleased to cut your shaggy beard with a reaping hook, and to gaze at your savage face in the water and compose its expression.
Quote by Galatea
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 12: 453-478 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Sanctity of Life

Pompeia
Caesar replied, "I wished my wife to be not so much as suspected."
Plt Caesar Chapter 10: Clodius and Pompeia

Pompey
For Perpenna, having in his custody all Sertorius's papers, offered to produce several letters from the greatest men in Rome, who, desirous of a change and subversion of the government, had invited Sertorius into Italy. And Pompey, fearing that these might be the occasion of worse wars than those which were now ended, thought it advisable to put Perpenna to death, and burnt the letters without reading them.
Plt Pompey Chapter 20: Sertrius murdered; Pompey defeats Perpenna.

Pompey
and he said of Pompeius, who failed to follow up his success, that he did not know how to use a victory;
Quote by Julius Caesar
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 36: The Civil war, comment.

Pompey
That Aemilia great with child should be, as it were, ravished from the embraces of another for him, and that Antistia should be divorced with dishonor and misery by him, for whose sake she had been but just before bereft of her father.
Plt Pompey Chapter 9: Pompey marries Aemilia

Pompey
Pompey, it is said, designed to have his triumphant chariot drawn with four elephants, (having brought over several which belonged to the African kings,) but the gates of the city being too narrow, he was forced to desist from that project, and be content with horses.
Plt Pompey Chapter 14: Pompey gets a triumph

Pompey
Cneius Pompeius was then for the third time elected consul to reform public morals, but in applying remedies more terrible than the evils and repealing the legislation of which he had himself been the author, he lost by arms what by arms he had been maintaining
Ann Book III Chapter 28: On the Papia Poppaea law

Pompey
When he came to Rhodes, he attended the lectures of all the philosophers there, and gave to every one of them a talent.
Plt Pompey Chapter 42: The heritage of Mithridates. Pompey returns to Rome

Pompey
Cneius Pompeius was the first of our countrymen to subdue the Jews. Availing himself of the right of conquest, he entered the temple. Thus it became commonly known that the place stood empty with no similitude of gods within, and that the shrine had nothing to reveal.
His Book V Chapter 9: The Jews. Their history according to Tacitus (cont.)

Pompey
And well had it been for him had he terminated his life at this date, while he still enjoyed Alexander's fortune,
Plt Pompey Chapter 46: Further problems in the senate

Pompey
Cato then advised them to choose Pompey general with absolute power and authority, saying that the same men who do great evils, know best how to cure them.
Quote by Cato the Younger
Plt Pompey Chapter 61: Civil war: Pompey leaves Rome

Pompey
Today the victory had been the enemy's, had there been anyone among them to gain it
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Pompey Chapter 65: Civil war: battle of Dyrrhachium

Pompey
Is it not a most generous and worthy act, that the consulship should be given to Lepidus, the vilest of men, in preference to Catulus, the best and most deserving in the city, and all by your influence with the people?
Quote by Sulla
Plt Pompey Chapter 15: Sulla and Pompey

Poppaea Sabina
When Scipio was called on for his opinion, he replied, "As I think what all men think about the deeds of Poppaea, suppose me to say what all men say."
Quote by Scipio
Ann Book XI Chapter 4: The Petra brothers

Poppaea Sabina
Her conversation was charming and her wit anything but dull
Ann Book XIII Chapter 45: Nero and Poppaea

Poppaea Sabina
In the midst of these measures,... and by a decree of the Senate restored the statues of Poppaea.
His Book I Chapter 78: Revolt of Vitellius. Bribery of Otho

Poppaea Sabina
Poppaea died from a casual outburst of rage in her husband, who felled her with a kick when she was pregnant.
Ann Book XVI Chapter 6: Death of Poppaea

Porsena
The most probable tradition is that Porsena, knowing the City to be without food owing to the long investment, made the Romans a present of his richly-stored camp, in which provisions had been collected from the neighbouring fertile fields of Etruria. Then, to prevent the people seizing them indiscriminately as spoils of war, they were regularly sold, under the description of "the goods of Porsena," a description indicating rather the gratitude of the people than an auction of the king's personal property, which had never been at the disposal of the Romans.
Hor Book II Chapter 14: Final Attempt to restore the Tarquins.

Praecia
There was one Praecia, a celebrated wit and beauty, but in other respects nothing better than an ordinary harlot;
Plt Lucullus Chapter 6: Lucullus goes to Cilicia

Priam
He used at times to call Priam happy, because he had outlived all his kindred.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 62: Further cruelties.

Ptolemy
One of them, Ptolemaeus, had attended Otho in Spain, and had there foretold that his patron would survive Nero.
His Book I Chapter 22: Revolt of Otho. Predictions

Publius Claudius
Most of the judges giving their opinions so written as to be illegible, that they might not be in danger from the people by condemning him, nor in disgrace with the nobility by acquitting him.
Plt Caesar Chapter 10: Clodius and Pompeia

Publius Claudius
Clodius, the most insolent and outrageous demagogue of the time,
Plt Antony Chapter 2: His mother, his youth

Publius Claudius
Clodius, the vilest and most impudent wretch alive.
Plt Pompey Chapter 46: Further problems in the senate

Publius Cornelius Dolabella
And when it was told him that Antony and Dolabella were in a plot against him, he said he did not fear such fat, luxurious men, but rather the pale, lean fellows, meaning Cassius and Brutus
Plt Caesar Chapter 62: Caesar murdered; preliminaries

Publius Cornelius Dolabella
It is not," said he, "these well fed, long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and the hungry looking;" meaning Brutus and Cassius.
Quote by Julius Caesar
Plt Antony Chapter 11: Caesar and Antony

Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus
He only permitted his own sons , who were great lovers of learning, to take the king's books;
Plt Aemilius Chapter 27: Settling of Macedonia and Greece

Publius Horatius
"Go," he cried, in bitter reproach, "go to your betrothed with your ill-timed love, forgetful as you are of your dead brothers, of the one who still lives and of your country! So perish every Roman woman who mourns for an enemy!"
Hor Book I Chapter 26: Horatius' Murder of his Sister.

Publius Valerius Poplicola
He was universally admitted to be first in the conduct of war and the arts of peace, but though he enjoyed such an immense reputation, his private fortune was so scanty that it could not defray the expenses of his funeral.
Hor Book II Chapter 16: Fourth war with the Sabines.

Pygmalion
Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime
Vrg Book I Chapter 22: Venus tells Aeneas about Dido's life

Pylades
And Pylades he not only banished from the city, but from Italy also, for pointing with his finger at a spectator by whom, he was hissed, and turning the eyes of the audience upon him.
Quote by Cerialis
Stn Augustus, Chapter 45: His personal interest.

Pythagoras of Samos
He was the first to denounce the serving of animal flesh at table
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 2: 60-142 Pythagoras' Teachings: Vegetarianism

Quintus Fabius Maximus Aemilianus
He only permitted his own sons , who were great lovers of learning, to take the king's books;
Plt Aemilius Chapter 27: Settling of Macedonia and Greece

Quintus Fabius Vibulanus
Fabius was looked upon as more inclined to evil practices than to be any permanent good to them. This man, at one time so distinguished both at home and in the field, had been so changed by office and the influence of his colleagues that he preferred to take Appius as his model rather than be true to himself.
Hor Book III Chapter 41: The Second Decemvirate (Cont.)

Quintus Fulvius Flaccus
It was resolved, therefore, that Fulvius, the praetor, should present himself to the public assembly of the people, point out the necessities of the state, and exhort those persons who had increased their patrimonies by farming the public revenues, to furnish temporary loans for the service of that state, from which they had derived their wealth, and contract to supply what was necessary for the army in Spain, on the condition of being paid the first when there was money in the treasury.
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 48: Shortages in Rome and the provinces

Quintus Haterius
Quintus Haterius, when he brought forward a motion that the decrees passed that day should be set up in the Senate-House in letters of gold
Ann Book III Chapter 57: Flattered by the Senate

Quintus Lutatius Catulus
Is death a thing so much to weep for?
Quote by Turnus
Vrg Book XI Chapter 24: Camilla's army

Quintus Lutatius Catulus
Is it not a most generous and worthy act, that the consulship should be given to Lepidus, the vilest of men, in preference to Catulus, the best and most deserving in the city, and all by your influence with the people?
Quote by Sulla
Plt Pompey Chapter 15: Sulla and Pompey

Quintus Sertorius
As soon as he heard of his mother's death, he had almost cast away himself and died for grief; for he lay seven days together continually in his tent, without giving the word, or being seen by the nearest of his friends
Plt Sertorius Chapter 22: Sertorius in Spain; complots.

Quintus Sertorius
In straightforward fighting, no commander in his time was more bold and daring, and in whatever was to be performed in war by stratagem, secrecy, or surprise, if any strong place was to be secured, any pass to be gained speedily, for deceiving and overreaching an enemy, there was no man equal to him in subtlety and skill.
Plt Sertorius Chapter 10: Sertorius is invited by the Lusitanians

Quintus Sertorius
It is reported of Sertorius, that he never slew any man in his anger, to satisfy his own private revenge, nor ever insulted over anyone whom he had overcome;
Plt Sertorius Chapter 5: Marius vs Sulla.

Remus
The more common report is that Remus contemptuously jumped over the newly raised walls and was forthwith killed by the enraged Romulus, who exclaimed, "So shall it be henceforth with every one who leaps over my walls."
Hor Book I Chapter 7: Death of Remus. The Legend of Hercules and Cacus.

Rhascuporis the Thracian
The other a fierce and ambitious spirit, which could not brook a partner.
Ann Book II Chapter 64: War in Thrace

Rhascuporis the Thracian
The other with a treacherous intent
Ann Book II Chapter 65: War in Thrace. Cotys betrayed.

Rhoetus
Of Rhoetus' ancient line, who dared defile his step-dame's bridal bed.
Vrg Book X Chapter 17: Assault of Pallas

Romulus
The more common report is that Remus contemptuously jumped over the newly raised walls and was forthwith killed by the enraged Romulus, who exclaimed, "So shall it be henceforth with every one who leaps over my walls."
Hor Book I Chapter 7: Death of Remus. The Legend of Hercules and Cacus.

Romulus
He called into his service twelve lictors. Some think that he fixed upon this number from the number of the birds who foretold his sovereignty; but I am inclined to agree with those who think that as this class of public officers was borrowed from the same people from whom the sella curulis and the toga praetexta were adopted -- their neighbours, the Etruscans -- so the number itself also was taken from them. Its use amongst the Etruscans is traced to the custom of the twelve sovereign cities of Etruria, when jointly electing a king furnishing him each with one lictor.
Hor Book I Chapter 8: The Political Constitution.

Romulus
"Go," said he, "tell the Romans that it is the will of heaven that my Rome should be the head of all the world. Let them henceforth cultivate the arts of war, and let them know assuredly, and hand down the knowledge to posterity, that no human might can withstand the arms of Rome."
Hor Book I Chapter 16: Disappearance of Romulus.

Romulus
It had been the ancient policy of the founders of cities to get together a multitude of people of obscure and low origin and then to spread the fiction that they were the children of the soil.
Hor Book I Chapter 8: The Political Constitution.

Romulus
The son of Mars, Great Romulus.
Quote by Anchises
Vrg Book VI Chapter 30: The future is described

Romulus
Romulus was attending a sacrifice, being fond of sacred rites and divination,
Plt Romulus, chapter 7: The Foundation of Rome (cont.)

Romulus
As nothing could unite them into one political body but the observance of common laws and customs, he gave them a body of laws, which he thought would only be respected by a rude and uncivilised race of men if he inspired them with awe by assuming the outward symbols of power.
Hor Book I Chapter 8: The Political Constitution.

Rubrius
Against Rubrius the charge was that he had violated by perjury the divinity of Augustus.
Ann Book I Chapter 73: Prosecutions for Majestas. Falanius and Rubrius

Sallust
I cannot but wonder on this occasion at Sallust, who says that this was the first time camels were seen by the Romans, as if he thought those who, long before, under Scipio, defeated Antiochus, or those who lately had fought against Archelaus near Orchomenus and Chaeronea, had not known what a camel was.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 11: battle of the river Rhyndacus

Salonina
Salonina, though it injured no one that she presented a conspicuous figure as she rode through their towns on horseback in a purple habit.
His Book II Chapter 20: Otho versus Vitellius. Caecina attacks

Scaevola
Then he plunged his right hand into a fire burning on the altar.
Hor Book II Chapter 12: The story of Mucius Scaevola.

Scipio Africanus the Elder
I hold the view that Publius Cornelius Scipio was elected consul not for his own private ends, but for us and the common-wealth, and that armies are raised to guard this city and the soil of Italy, and not for consuls to transport to any part of the world they please in the arrogant style of kings and despots."
Quote by Fabius Cunctator
Hor Book XXXVIII Chapter 42: Speech of Quintus Fabius against Scipio's plan to attack Africa (cont.)

Scipio Africanus the Elder
Just in the same way you, a general of the Roman people, left your province and your army without any legal authority, without any instructions from the senate, and entrusted to a couple of ships the fortunes of the State and the majesty of the empire which were for the time bound up with your own safety.
Quote by Fabius Cunctator
Hor Book XXXVIII Chapter 42: Speech of Quintus Fabius against Scipio's plan to attack Africa (cont.)

Scipio Africanus the Elder
Hasdrubal openly avowed that "he admired Scipio more now that he had made his personal acquaintance than after his military successes, and he had no doubt that Syphax and his kingdom were already at the disposal of Rome, such skill did the Roman possess in winning men.
Hor Book XXXVIII Chapter 18: Scipio and Hasdrubal visit Syphax (cont.)

Scipio Africanus the Elder
When the tribunes of the people opposed his pretensions to the aedileship, alleging, that no notice ought to be taken of him, because he had not attained the legal age for candidateship, he observed, "if the citizens in general are desirous of appointing me aedile, I am old enough."
Hor Book XXV Chapter 2: Appointments

Scylla
But Scylla, prisoned in her eyeless cave, thrusts forth her face, and pulls upon the rocks ship after ship; the parts that first be seen are human; a fair-breasted virgin she, down to the womb; but all that lurks below is a huge-membered fish, where strangely join the flukes of dolphins and the paunch of wolves.
Quote by Helenus
Vrg Book III Chapter 16: Prophecy of Helenus (cont.)

Segestes
This is not my first day of steadfast loyalty towards the Roman people. From the time that the Divine Augustus gave me the citizenship, I have chosen my friends and foes with an eye to your advantage, not from hatred of my fatherland (for traitors are detested even by those whom they prefer) but because I held that Romans and Germans have the same interests, and that peace is better than war.
Ann Book I Chapter 58: War with the Germans. Speech of Segestes

Segestes
Famous … for .. loyalty towards us.
Ann Book I Chapter 55: War with the Germans. Arminius and Segestes

Sejanus
He had a body which could endure hardships, and a daring spirit. He was one who screened himself, while he was attacking others; he was as cringing as he was imperious; before the world he affected humility; in his heart he lusted after supremacy, for the sake of which he sometimes lavish and luxurious, but oftener energetic and watchful, qualities quite as
Ann Book IV Chapter 1: Seianus ambition. His background

Sejanus
Sejanus, whom they already suspected of overweening ambition.
Ann Book III Chapter 29: Appointments and marriages

Sempronius Gracchus
Dying with a courage not unworthy of the Sempronian name, which his degenerate life had dishonoured.
Ann Book I Chapter 53: Death of Julia and Gracchus

Seneca
By what kind of wisdom or maxims of philosophy had Seneca within four years of royal favour amassed three hundred million sesterces?
Quote by Publius Suilius
Ann Book XIII Chapter 42: Suilius against Seneca

Seppius Lesius
It is reported that his mother, when formerly expiating a prodigy which had occurred in the family in behalf of this boy, who was an orphan, received an answer from the aruspex, stating, that "the highest office would come to him;" and that not recognising, at Capua, any ground for such a hope, exclaimed, the state of the Campanians must be desperate indeed, when the highest office shall come to my son."
Hor Book XXV Chapter 6: Problems of the soldiers in Sicily.

Servius Tullius
Tarquin went back to the king's birth, protested that he was a slave and the son of a slave, and after his (the speaker's) father had been foully murdered, seized the throne, as a woman's gift, without any interrex being appointed as heretofore, without any assembly being convened, without any vote of the people being taken or any confirmation of it by the Fathers. Such was his origin, such was his right to the crown. His sympathies were with the dregs of society from which he had sprung, and through jealousy of the ranks to which he did not belong, he had taken the land from the foremost men in the State and divided it amongst the vilest; he had shifted on to them the whole of the burdens which had formerly been borne in common by all; he had instituted the census that the fortunes of the wealthy might be held up to envy, and be an easily available source from which to shower doles, whenever he pleased, upon the neediest.
Quote by Tarquinius Superbus
Hor Book I Chapter 47: The Assassination of the King (Cont.)

Sextilia
Triaria's recklessness was rendered more intolerable by an immediate contrast with the exemplary virtue of Galeria, the Emperor's wife, who took no part in these horrors, and with Sextilia, the mother of the two Vitellii, a woman equally blameless, and of the old type of character.
His Book II Chapter 64: Vitellius emperor. Dolabella killed

Sinon
With skilful guile, Greek that he was
Vrg Book II Chapter 8: Sinon about the Wooden horse

Socrates
With profound meaning was it often affirmed by the greatest teacher of philosophy that, could the minds of tyrants be laid bare, there would be seen gashes and wounds; for, as the body is lacerated by scourging, so is the spirit by brutality, by lust and by evil thoughts
Ann Book VI Chapter 6: Tiberius' conscience

Subrius Flavus
Questioned by Nero as to the motives which had led him on to forget his oath of allegiance, "I hated you," he replied; "yet not a soldier was more loyal to you while you deserved to be loved. I began to hate you when you became the murderer of your mother and your wife, a charioteer, an actor, and an incendiary.
Ann Book XV Chapter 67: The conspiracy of Piso. Death of Subrius Flavus

Suedius Clemens
Clemens commanded only for popularity, and was as reckless in transgressing the good order of military discipline as he was eager to fight.
His Book II Chapter 12: Otho versus Vitellius. The Maritime Alps

Sulla
He remembered the admonition of Sulla, whose advice it is in his Memoirs, to treat nothing as so certain and so worthy of reliance as an intimation given in dreams.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 23: Siege of Sinope

Tacitus
This I regard as history's highest function, to let no worthy action be uncommemorated, and to hold out the reprobation of posterity as a terror to evil words and deeds
Ann Book III Chapter 65: Flattered by the Senate

Tarquinius Superbus
He employed methods against it which were anything but Roman, namely, fraud and deceit
Hor Book I Chapter 52: Treaty with the Latins.

Tarquinius Superbus
As more over, he had no hope of winning the affections of the citizens, he had to maintain his dominion by fear. To make himself more dreaded, he conducted the trials in capital cases without any assessors, and under this pretence he was able to put to death, banish or fine not only those whom he suspected or disliked, but also those from whom his only object was to extort money.
Hor Book I Chapter 49: Lucius Tarquinius Superbus

Tarquinius Superbus
This people who were at that time in possession of Ardea, were, considering the nature of their country and the age in which they lived, exceptionally wealthy. This circumstance really originated the war, for the Roman king was anxious to repair his own fortune, which had been exhausted by the magnificent scale of his public works and also to conciliate his subjects by a distribution of the spoils of war.
Hor Book I Chapter 57: The Rape of Lucretia.

Tarrutius
Out of curiosity had studied the way of drawing schemes and tables, and was thought to be a proficient in the art;
Plt Romulus, chapter 14: When was Rome built?

Thusnelde
But who exhibited the spirit of her husband rather than of her father, subdued neither to tears nor to the tones of a suppliant, her hands tightly clasped within her bosom, and eyes which dwelt on her hope of offspring.
Ann Book I Chapter 57: War with the Germans. Segestes gets help

Tiberius
Alas for the Roman people, to be ground by jaws that crunch so slowly!"
Quote by Augustus
Stn Tiberius Chapter 21: Death of Augustus

Tiberius
But he would not therefore accept the title of father of the country" which once before too had been offered him, and he sharply rebuked those who called his work divine" and himself lord.
Ann Book II Chapter 87: On corn prices.

Tiberius
The first crime of the new reign was the murder of Postumus Agrippa.
Ann Book I Chapter 6: Murder of Agrippa Posthumus (14 AD)

Tiberius
It was part of Tiberius' character to prolong indefinitely military commands and to keep many men to the end of their life with the same armies and in the same administrations. Various motives have been assigned for this. Some say that, out of aversion to any fresh anxiety, he retained what he had once approved as a permanent arrangement; others, that he grudged to see many enjoying promotion. Some, again, think that though he had an acute intellect, his judgment was irresolute, for he did not seek out eminent merit, and yet he detested vice. From the best men he apprehended danger to himself, from the worst, disgrace to the State. He went so far at last in this irresolution, that he appointed to provinces men whom he did not mean to allow to leave Rome.
Ann Book I Chapter 80: Prolonging military commands

Tiberius
All this was inflamed and aggravated by Sejanus, who, with his thorough comprehension of the character of Tiberius, sowed for a distant future hatreds which the emperor might treasure up and might exhibit when fully matured.
Quote by Sejanus
Ann Book I Chapter 69: War with the Germans. The bridge over the Rhine

Tiberius
he wrote in answer that it was the part of a good shepherd to shear his flock, not skin it.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 32: A modest start (cont.)

Tiberius
and often led him to say that he was holding a wolf by the ears.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 25: Tiberius feels threatened

Tiberius
But he had the old arrogance inbred in the Claudian family, and many symptoms of a cruel temper, though they were repressed, now and then broke out.
Ann Book I Chapter 4: Augustus' succession(cont.)

Tiberius
He showed marked respect to Livia Augusta, to whose favor he owed great influence during her lifetime and by whose last will he almost became a rich man; for he had the largest bequest among her legatees, one of fifty million sesterces. But because the sum was designated in figures and not written out in words, Tiberius, who was her heir, reduced the bequest to five hundred thousand, and Galba never received even that amount.
Stn Galba, Chapter 5: Galba as husband and heir

Tiberius
Proud and mysterious reserve that marked the conversation and the features of Tiberius
Ann Book I Chapter 33: Revolt in Germania. Germanicus

Tiberius
And when Tiberius, in a letter, complained of the affront with great earnestness, he returned him an answer in the following terms: Do not, my dear Tiberius, give way to the ardour of youth in this affair; nor be so indignant that any person should speak ill of me. It is enough, for us, if we can prevent anyone from really doing us mischief.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 51: On insults.

Tiberius
Had disdained him (Tiberius) as an unequal match.
Quote by Julia the Elder
Ann Book I Chapter 53: Death of Julia and Gracchus

Tiberius
He had not even adopted Tiberius as his successor out of affection or any regard to the State, but, having thoroughly seen his arrogant and savage temper, he had sought glory for himself by a contrast of extreme wickedness.
Ann Book I Chapter 10: The reign of Augustus(cont.)

Tiberius
Was it probable that, when Tiberius with his long experience of affairs was, under the influence of absolute power, wholly perverted and changed, Gaius Caesar, who had hardly completed his boyhood, was thoroughly ignorant and bred under the vilest training, would enter on a better course, with Macro for his guide, who having been selected for his superior wickedness, to crush Sejanus had by yet more numerous crimes been the scourge of the State?
Quote by Lucius Arruntius
Ann Book VI Chapter 48: Arruntius and Albucilla

Tiberius
Flattery there was none, for all knew that Tiberius could scarcely dissemble his joy at the death of Germanicus.
Ann Book III Chapter 2: The funeral of Germanicus

Tiberius
And he was also careful not to distress the provinces by new burdens, and to see that in bearing the old they were safe from any rapacity or oppression on the part of governors
Ann Book IV Chapter 6: Tiberius' administration

Tiberius
He had indeed a tall, singularly slender and stooping figure, a bald head, a face full of eruptions, and covered here and there with plasters
Ann Book I Chapter 57: War with the Germans. Segestes gets help

Tiberius
Tiberius however, making no change in his voluptuous life, excused himself by letter for his absence from his last duty to his mother on the ground of the pressure of business. He even abridged, out of moderation, as it seemed, the honours which the Senate had voted on a lavish scale to her memory, allowing only a very few, and adding that no religious worship was to be decreed, this having been her own wish
Ann Book V Chapter 1: Death of Livia

Tiberius
In shame at the vices and profligacies into which he had plunged so unrestrainedly that in the fashion of a despot he debauched the children of free-born citizens. It was not merely beauty and a handsome person which he felt as an incentive to his lust, but the modesty of childhood in some, and noble ancestry in others. Hitherto unknown terms were then for the first time invented, derived from the abominations of the place and the endless phases of sensuality. Slaves were set over the work of seeking out and procuring, with rewards for the willing, and threats to the reluctant, and if there was resistance from a relative or a parent, they used violence and force, and actually indulged their own passions as if dealing with captives.
Ann Book VI Chapter 1: Tiberius on Capri. His vices

Tiberius
For he had revived the law of treason
Ann Book I Chapter 72: Prosecutions for Majestas

Tiberius
He abolished foreign cults, especially the Egyptian and the Jewish rites, compelling all who were addicted to such superstitions to burn their religious vestments and all their paraphernalia
Stn Tiberius Chapter 36: Foreign cults.

Tiberius
This Tiberius did not approve, either interpreting unfavourably every act of Germanicus, or because he thought that the spectacle of the slain and unburied made the army slow to fight and more afraid of the enemy, and that a general invested with the augurate and its very ancient ceremonies ought not to have polluted himself with funeral rites.
Ann Book I Chapter 62: War with the Germans. Funeral of the remains

Tiberius
When a deputation from Ilium offered him somewhat belated condolences, he replied with a smile, as if the memory of his bereavement had faded from his mind, that they, too, had his sympathy for the loss of their eminent fellow-citizen Hector.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 52: Death of Germanicus and Drusus

Tiberius
Tiberius too thoroughly understood the art of balancing words, and was sometimes forcible in the expression of his thoughts, or else intentionally obscure
Ann Book XIII Chapter 3: The funeral of Claudius

Tiberius
He was nevertheless immoderately afraid of thunder.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 69: Afraid of thunder.

Tiberius
He forbade anyone to consult soothsayers secretly and without witnesses
Stn Tiberius Chapter 63: Politics.

Tiberius
He used at times to call Priam happy, because he had outlived all his kindred.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 62: Further cruelties.

Tiberius
Let them hate me, provided they respect my conduct.
Stn Tiberius Chapter 59: A poem about all of it.

Tiberius
He issued an edict forbidding general kissing, as well as the exchange of New Year's gifts after the Kalends of January
Stn Tiberius Chapter 34: His frugality.

Tiberius Gemellus
At the same moment he embraced the younger of his two grandsons with a flood of tears, and, noting the savage face of the other, said, "You will slay this boy, and will be yourself slain by another
Quote by Tiberius
Ann Book VI Chapter 46: Succession of Tiberius

Tigellinus
Those unhallowed frightful excesses among impure and prostituted women, to which, at the very close of life, his lewd nature clung
Plt Otho Chapter 2: Suicide of Tigellinus

Tigellinus
At length Tigellinus, having received at the springs of Sinuessa a message that his last hour was come, amid the embraces and caresses of his mistresses and other unseemly delays, cut his throat with a razor, and aggravated the disgrace of an infamous life by a tardy and ignominious death.
His Book I Chapter 72: The death of Tigellinus

Tigranes
Tigranes asked him, "what would you, Metrodorus, advise me to in this affair?" In return to which, either out of good-will to Tigranes, or a want of solicitude for Mithridates, he made answer, that as ambassador he counseled him to it, but as a friend dissuaded him from it.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 22: Administration of Asia

Timon
One day he got up in a full assembly on the speaker's place, and when there was a dead silence and great wonder at so unusual a sight, he said, "Ye men of Athens, I have a little plot of ground, and in it grows a fig-tree, on which many citizens have been pleased to hang themselves; and now, having resolved to build in that place, I wished to announce it publicly that any of you who may be desirous may go and hang yourselves before I cut it down."
Plt Antony Chapter 70: Timon of Athens

Timon
He avoided and repelled the approaches of everyone, but embraced with kisses and the greatest show of affection Alcibiades, then in his hot youth. And when Apemantus was astonished, and demanded the reason, he replied that he knew this young man would one day do infinite mischief to the Athenians.
Plt Antony Chapter 70: Timon of Athens

Titus
There was a firm persuasion, that in the ancient records of their priests was contained a prediction of how at this very time the East was to grow powerful, and rulers, coming from Judaea, were to acquire universal empire. These mysterious prophecies had pointed to Vespasian and Titus, but the common people, with the usual blindness of ambition, had interpreted these mighty destinies of themselves, and could not be brought even by disasters to believe the truth.
His Book V Chapter 13: Jewish-Roman War. The siege of Jerusalem (cont.)

Titus
On another occasion, remembering at dinner that he had done nothing for anybody all that day, he gave utterance to that memorable and praiseworthy remark: "Friends, I have lost a day."
Stn Titus, Chapter 8: His generosity

Titus
By his courtesy and affability he called forth a willing obedience
His Book V Chapter 1: The Jewish War

Titus
When Titus found fault with him for contriving a tax upon public toilets, he held a piece of money from the first payment to his son's nose, asking whether its odor was offensive to him. When Titus said "No," he replied, "Yet it comes from urine.
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 23: Wit

Titus
But the vulgar, ever eager to invent, had spread the report that he was sent for to be adopted. The advanced years and childless condition of the Emperor furnished matter for such gossip, and the country never can refrain from naming many persons until one be chosen.
His Book II Chapter 1: Titus returns

Titus Clodius Eprius Marcellus
Let Marcellus be satisfied with having urged Nero to destroy so many innocent victims; let him enjoy the wages of his crimes and his impunity, but let him leave Vespasian to worthier advisers."
His Book IV Chapter 7: Envoys to Vespasian

Titus Flavius Sabinus
His blamelessness and integrity no one could question. He was somewhat boastful; this was the only fault of which rumour accused him in the seven years during which he had governed Moesia, and the twelve during which he was prefect of the city.
His Book III Chapter 75: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. On Sabinus

Titus Manlius
My natural love of my children and that proof of courage which from a false sense of honour you have given, move me to take your part, but since either the consuls' authority must be vindicated by your death or forever abrogated by letting you go unpunished, I would believe that even you yourself, if there is a drop of my blood in your veins, will not shrink from restoring by your punishment the military discipline which has been weakened by your misconduct.
Hor Book VIII Chapter 7: The Revolt of the Latins and Campanians. Titus Manlius.

Titus Manlius
My natural love of my children and that proof of courage which from a false sense of honour you have given, move me to take your part, but since either the consuls' authority must be vindicated by your death or forever abrogated by letting you go unpunished, I would believe that even you yourself, if there is a drop of my blood in your veins, will not shrink from restoring by your punishment the military discipline which has been weakened by your misconduct.
Hor Book VIII Chapter 7: The Revolt of the Latins and Campanians. Titus Manlius.

Titus Pomponius Veientanus
As the state had taken upon itself the risk of any loss which might arise from storms to the commodities conveyed to the armies, not only had these two men fabricated false accounts of shipwrecks, but even those which had really occurred were occasioned by their own knavery, and not by accident. Their plan was to put a few goods of little value into old and shattered vessels, which they sank in the deep, taking up the sailors in boats prepared for the purpose, and then returning falsely the cargo as many times more valuable than it was.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 3: The Appointed people start their work. Posthumius charged.

Titus Vinius
That officer's wife, urged by a perverse curiosity to view the camp, entered it by night in the disguise of a soldier, and after extending the insulting frolic to the watches and the general arrangements of the army, actually dared to commit the act of adultery in the head-quarters. Vinius was charged with having participated in her guilt, and by order of Gaius was loaded with irons
His Book I Chapter 48: Revolt of Otho. The victims

Titus Vinius
He subsequently incurred the degrading imputation of having pilfered a gold cup at the table of Claudius, who the next day directed that he alone should be served on earthenware.
His Book I Chapter 48: Revolt of Otho. The victims

Titus Vinius
Titus Vinius and Cornelius Laco, one the most worthless, the other the most spiritless of mankind, were ruining the weak old Emperor,
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Triaria
Triaria's recklessness was rendered more intolerable by an immediate contrast with the exemplary virtue of Galeria, the Emperor's wife, who took no part in these horrors, and with Sextilia, the mother of the two Vitellii, a woman equally blameless, and of the old type of character.
His Book II Chapter 64: Vitellius emperor. Dolabella killed

Tullia the Younger
It is said that Tullia, goaded to madness by the avenging spirits of her sister and her husband, drove right over her father's body, and carried back some of her father's blood with which the car and she herself were defiled to her own and her husband's house-hold gods, through whose anger a reign which began in wickedness was soon brought to a close by a like cause.
Hor Book I Chapter 48: The Assassination of the King (Cont.)

Tullus Hostilius
Convinced that the vigour of the State was becoming enfeebled through inaction, he looked all round for a pretext for getting up a war.
Hor Book I Chapter 22: Tullus Hostilius and the War with Alba.

Tullus Hostilius
At last he himself was seized with a lingering illness, and that fierce and restless spirit became so broken through bodily weakness, that he who had once thought nothing less fitting for a king than devotion to sacred things, now suddenly became a prey to every sort of religious terror, and filled the City with religious observances.
Hor Book I Chapter 31: Last Years and Death of Tullus.

Ulysses
False Ulysses, author of all guile
Quote by Sinon
Vrg Book II Chapter 8: Sinon about the Wooden horse

Ulysses
Besides there are some of opinion, that Ulysses, whilst he wandered about in his long and fabulous voyages, was carried into this ocean and entered Germany, and that by him Asciburgium was founded and named, a city at this day standing and inhabited upon the bank of the Rhine: nay, that in the same place was formerly found an altar dedicated to Ulysses, with the name of his father Laertes added to his own, and that upon the confines of Germany and Rhaetia are still extant certain monuments and tombs inscribed with Greek characters.
Ger Chapter 3: Hercules and Ulysses

Ulysses
Perverse man, why do you go after a prize that will cripple you?
Quote by Ajax
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 1: 1-59 Myscelus: the founding of Crotona

Ulysses
That cheat Ulysses
Quote by Sinon
Vrg Book II Chapter 6: Sinon tells his tale

Urgulania
Urgulania's influence, however, was so formidable to the State, that in a certain cause which was tried by the Senate she would not condescend to appear as a witness
Ann Book II Chapter 34: Piso and Urgulania.

Verginia
19 … Wisdom is justified of her children.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 11.

Verginius
19 … Wisdom is justified of her children.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 11.

Verginius
He was a man of exemplary character both at home and in the field. His wife had been brought up on equally high principles, and their children were being brought up in the same way.
Hor Book III Chapter 44: The Story of Virginia

Vespasian
There was a story that Vespasian was insulted by Phoebus, a freedman, for closing his eyes in a doze, and that having with difficulty been screened by the intercessions of the well disposed, he escaped imminent destruction through his grander destiny.
Ann Book XVI Chapter 5: Danger of a performance. Vespasian

Vespasian
There was a firm persuasion, that in the ancient records of their priests was contained a prediction of how at this very time the East was to grow powerful, and rulers, coming from Judaea, were to acquire universal empire. These mysterious prophecies had pointed to Vespasian and Titus, but the common people, with the usual blindness of ambition, had interpreted these mighty destinies of themselves, and could not be brought even by disasters to believe the truth.
His Book V Chapter 13: Jewish-Roman War. The siege of Jerusalem (cont.)

Vespasian
When Titus found fault with him for contriving a tax upon public toilets, he held a piece of money from the first payment to his son's nose, asking whether its odor was offensive to him. When Titus said "No," he replied, "Yet it comes from urine.
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 23: Wit

Vespasian
He was the first to establish a regular salary of a hundred thousand sesterces for Latin and Greek teachers of rhetoric,
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 18: Arts and culture

Vespasian
The fox changes his fur, but not his nature
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 16: His love for money

Vespasian
Vespasian was an energetic soldier; he could march at the head of his army, choose the place for his camp, and bring by night and day his skill, or, if the occasion required, his personal courage to oppose the foe. His food was such as chance offered; his dress and appearance hardly distinguished him from the common soldier; in short, but for his avarice, he was equal to the generals of old
His Book II Chapter 5: Titus returns (cont.)

Vespasian
Many wonders occurred which seemed to point him out as the object of the favour of heaven and of the partiality of the Gods.
His Book IV Chapter 81: Vespasian emperor. Vespasian as a healer

Vespasian
One of his highborn prisoners, Josephus by name, as he was being put in chains, declared most confidently that he would soon be released by the same man, who would then, however, be emperor.
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 5: Omens

Vespasian
Vespasian's government had been infamous and odious.
His Book II Chapter 97: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius summons the army

Vespasian
Methinks I'm turning into a god.
Quote by Vespasian
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 23: Wit

Vitellius
Then showing greater and greater disregard for the laws of gods and men, he assumed the office of high priest on the day of Allia
Stn Vitellius, Chapter 11: Vitellius in Rome

Vitellius
He delighted in inflicting death and torture on anyone whatsoever and for any cause whatever
Stn Vitellius, Chapter 14: Cruelty

Vitellius
When his mother died, he was suspected of having forbidden her being given food when she was ill,
Stn Vitellius, Chapter 14: Cruelty

Vitellius
But his besetting sins were luxury and cruelty.
Stn Vitellius, Chapter 13: Luxury

Vitellius
The astrologers were banished from Italy.
His Book II Chapter 62: Vitellius emperor (cont.)

Vitellius
Such a lethargy had come over his spirit, that, had not others remembered he had been an Emperor, he would have himself forgotten it.
His Book III Chapter 63: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. An army of Vitellius surrenders

Vitellius
Or the emperor's ears were so formed, that all profitable counsels were offensive to him, and that he would hear nothing but what would please and ruin.
His Book III Chapter 56: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. On Vitellius

Vitellius
Buried in the shades of his gardens, like those sluggish animals which, if you supply them with food, lie motionless and torpid, he had dismissed with the same forgetfulness the past, the present, and the future.
His Book III Chapter 36: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Reaction of Vitellius

Vitellius
No one sought promotion in that court by integrity or diligence; the sole road to power was to glut the insatiable appetites of Vitellius by prodigal entertainments, extravagance, and riot. The Emperor himself, thinking it enough to enjoy the present, and without a thought for the future, is believed to have squandered nine hundred million sesterces in a very few months.
His Book II Chapter 95: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius' birthday

Vitellius
Thus utterly regardless of all law human and divine, with freedmen and friends as reckless as himself, he lived as if he were among a set of drunkards. Still at the consular elections he was present in company with the candidates like an ordinary citizen, and by shewing himself as a spectator in the theatre, as a partisan in the circus, he courted every breath of applause from the lowest rabble. Agreeable and popular as this conduct would have been, had it been prompted by noble qualities, it was looked upon as undignified and contemptible from the remembrance of his past life
His Book II Chapter 91: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius rules

Vitellius
Though sterner judges pronounced Vitellius to be a man of low tastes, those who were partial to him attributed to geniality and good nature the immoderate and indiscriminate prodigality, with which he gave away what was his own, and squandered what did not belong to him. Besides this, men themselves eager for power were ready to represent his very vices as virtues. As there were in both armies many of obedient and quiet habits, so there were many who were as unprincipled as they were energetic;
His Book I Chapter 52: Revolt of Vitellius. Preparations

Vitellius
He was the slave and chattel of profligacy and gluttony.
His Book II Chapter 71: Vitellius emperor. To Rome

Vitellius
He had a scandalous and insatiable passion for feasts; the provocatives of gluttony were conveyed to him from the capital and from Italy, till the roads from both seas resounded with traffic; the leading men of the various states were ruined by having to furnish his entertainments, and the states themselves reduced to beggary; the soldiers fast degenerated from their old activity and valour, through habitual indulgence and contempt of their leader.
His Book II Chapter 62: Vitellius emperor (cont.)

Vitellius
He then ordered the whole army to come and greet his infant son; he brought him out, wrapped in a military cloak, and holding him in his arms, gave him the title of Germanicus and surrounded him with all the insignia of the imperial rank. It was an extravagant distinction for a day of prosperity, but it served as a consolation in adversity.
His Book II Chapter 59: Otho versus Vitellius. Vitellius travels through Gaul

Vitellius
Vitellius with his sensuality and gluttony
His Book II Chapter 31: Otho versus Vitellius. The strategy of Otho

Vitellius
Vitellius, on the contrary, was sunk in sloth, and anticipated the enjoyment of supreme power in indolent luxury and prodigal festivities. By midday he was half-intoxicated, and heavy with food;
His Book I Chapter 62: Revolt of Vitellius. His character

Vitellius
Prayers for either would be impious, vows for either a blasphemy, when from their conflict you can only learn that the conqueror must be the worse of the two
His Book I Chapter 50: Revolt of Vitellius

Vitellius
That two men, who for shamelessness, indolence, and profligacy, were the most worthless of mortals, had been selected, it would seem, by some fatality to ruin the empire, became the open complaint, not only of the Senate and the Knights, who had some stake and interest in the country, but even of the common people.
His Book I Chapter 50: Revolt of Vitellius

Vitellius
But now, both the Emperor and the army, as if they had no rival to fear, indulging in cruelty, lust, and rapine, plunged into all the licence of foreign manners.
His Book II Chapter 73: Vitellius emperor. Rumours

Vitia
Vitia, an aged woman, mother of Fufius Geminus, was executed for bewailing the death of her son.
Ann Book VI Chapter 10: The fall of Sejanus. Further consequences (cont.)

Vonones
Vonones himself too further provoked their disdain, by his contrast with their ancestral manners, by his rare indulgence in the chase, by his feeble interest in horses, by the litter in which he was carried whenever he made a progress through their cities, and by his contemptuous dislike of their national festivities.
Ann Book II Chapter 2: Commotion in Parthia and Armenia. History.

Zalmoxes
Zalmoxes reigned whom many writers of annals mention as a man of remarkable learning in philosophy.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Zeno
Zeno, son of Polemon, king of Pontus who from his earliest infancy had imitated Armenian manners and customs, loving the chase, the banquet, and all the popular pastimes of barbarians, and who had thus bound to himself chiefs and people alike.
Ann Book II Chapter 55: Germanicus goes East. Piso too.