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Quote of the day: This Tiberius did not approve, either in

Subjects: Quotes and links to a source

List of used abbreviations:
Agr:
Ann:
Aug:
Dbg:
Ger:
Gth:
His:
Hor:
Msp:
NwT:
Ovd:
Plt:
Stn:
Vrg:
Tacitus' Agricola.
Tacitus' Annals.
The Deeds of the Divine Augustus
De Bello Gallico, by Julius Caesar
Tacitus' Germania.
The Goths, by Jordanes.
Histories, by Tacitus.
History of Rome, by Livy.
Mispogon by Julian
New Testament.
Metamorphosis by Ovid.
Parallel lives by Plutarch.
Suetonius 12 Caesars
Virgil Aeneid.
General quotes:

"Go," said he, "tell the Romans that it is the will of heaven that my Rome should be the head of all the world. Let them henceforth cultivate the arts of war, and let them know assuredly, and hand down the knowledge to posterity, that no human might can withstand the arms of Rome."
Hor Book I Chapter 16: Disappearance of Romulus.

But true affection for our country demands that we should preserve it, if need be, by our disgrace as much as by our death
Quote by Lucius Lentulus
Hor Book IX Chapter 4: War with the Samnites. Speech of Lentulus.

18 For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God.
Quote by Paul
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 1

12 Let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.
Quote by Paul
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians Chapter 10

5 For every man shall bear his own burden.
Quote by Paul
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Galathians Chapter 6

7 ... for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Galathians Chapter 6

9 Are there not twelve hours in the day?
Quote by Jesus
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 11.

13 Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.
Quote by Jesus
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 15.

38 ... What is truth?
Quote by Pontius Pilate
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 18.

22 What I have written I have written.
Quote by Pontius Pilate
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 19.

2 For there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; neither hid, that shall not be known.
Quote by Jesus
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 12.

26 there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; and hid, that shall not be known.
Quote by Jesus
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 10.

19 For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.
Quote by Paul
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Romans Chapter 7

Make haste slowly
Quote by Augustus
Stn Augustus, Chapter 25: Military affairs. Cont.

That is done fast enough, which is done well enough
Quote by Augustus
Stn Augustus, Chapter 25: Military affairs. Cont.

I say there is nothing in the whole universe that persists. Everything flows, and is formed as a fleeting image. Time itself, also, glides, in its continual motion, no differently than a river.
Quote by Pythagoras of Samos
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 4: 176-198 Pythagoras' Teachings: The Eternal Flux

Quotes by subject:

Actor
And Pylades he not only banished from the city, but from Italy also, for pointing with his finger at a spectator by whom, he was hissed, and turning the eyes of the audience upon him.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 45: His personal interest.

Adoptions
A very demoralizing custom had at this time become rife, of fictitious adoptions of children, on the eve of the elections or of the assignment of the provinces, by a number of childless persons, who, after obtaining along with real fathers, praetorships and provinces, forthwith dismissed from paternal control the sons whom they had adopted
Ann Book XV Chapter 19: Fictitious adoptions

Adultery
31 It hath been said, Whosoever shall put away his wife, let him give her a writing of divorcement: 32 But I say unto you, That whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of fornication, causeth her to commit adultery: and whosoever shall marry her that is divorced committeth adultery.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 5.

Alphabet
He besides invented three new letters, and added them to the former alphabet, as highly necessary.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 41: Claudius invents new letters

Amber
You would however conceive it to be a liquor issuing from trees, for that in the transparent substance are often seen birds and other animals, such as at first stuck in the soft gum, and by it, as it hardened, became quite enclosed. I am apt to believe that, as in the recesses of the East are found woods and groves dropping frankincense and balms, so in the isles and continent of the West such gums are extracted by the force and proximity of the sun; at first liquid and flowing into the next sea, then thrown by winds and waves upon the opposite shore. If you try the nature of amber by the application of fire, it kindles like a torch; and feeds a thick and unctuous flame very high scented, and presently becomes glutinous like pitch or rosin.
Ger Chapter 45: Aestyans, amber and Sitones

Anchor
An ancient anchor has been found on a mountain-top.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 7: 259-306 Pythagoras' Teachings:Geological changes

Anecdotes
For old age usually revives in the elderly that love of gossip which is natural to the young; and this is, I think, the reason why both the old and the young are equally fond of stories.
Msp Chapter 20

Archery
Sometimes he would have a slave stand at a distance and hold out the palm of his right hand for a mark, with the fingers spread; then he directed his arrows with such accuracy that they passed harmlessly between the fingers.
Stn Domitian, Chapter 19: Domitian as an archer

Arts
He conferred citizenship on all who practiced medicine at Rome, and on all teachers of the liberal arts
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 42: Julius Caesar Dictator. Legislation.

Astrologers
Decrees of the Senate were also passed to expel from Italy astrologers and magicians
Ann Book II Chapter 32: Prosecutions for Majestas. Libo Drusus (cont.)

Astrologers
The astrologers also urged him to action, predicting from their observation of the heavens revolutions, and a year of glory for Otho
His Book I Chapter 22: Revolt of Otho. Predictions

Astrologers
This is a class of men, whom the powerful cannot trust, and who deceive the aspiring, a class which will always be proscribed in this country, and yet always retained
His Book I Chapter 22: Revolt of Otho. Predictions

Balsam
The balsam is a shrub; each branch, as it fills with sap, may be pierced with a fragment of stone or pottery. If steel is employed, the veins shrink up. The sap is used by physicians.
His Book V Chapter 4: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus

Barbarians
For with barbarians, the more eager a man's daring, the more does he inspire confidence, and the more highly is he esteemed in times of revolution.
Ann Book I Chapter 57: War with the Germans. Segestes gets help

Barbarians
They deemed it indeed a duty to cover their altars with the blood of captives and to consult their deities through human entrails.
Ann Book XIV Chapter 30: Further problems in Britain. Mona conquered

Battle of the Metaurus
People listened to the rumour, but they could not take it in, the news was too great, too joyful for them to realise or to accept as true, and the very speed at which it had travelled made it less credible, for the battle was reported as having taken place only two days previously.
Hor Book XXVII Chapter 50: The news arrives in Rome

Battles
Rumour decides battles
Hor Book XXVII Chapter 45: Claudius Nero speaks to his soldiers and marches on

Beard
The natural beauty of a beard.
Gth Chapter 24: Origin of the Huns.

Beer
For their drink, they draw a liquor from barley or other grain; and ferment the same, so as to make it resemble wine.
Ger Chapter 23: Food and drink

Bees
Bury the carcases of sacrificed bulls (it is a known experiment) in the ditch where you have thrown them, and flower-sipping bees, will be born, here and there, from the putrid entrails.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Bird
What bird is clean that preys on fellow bird?
Plt Romulus, chapter 10: The Foundation of Rome (cont.)

Bitumen
It shrinks from blood or any cloth stained by the menstrua of women.
His Book V Chapter 6: The Jews. Their country according to Tacitus

Bitumen
Those who know the country say that the bitumen moves in heaving masses on the water, that it is drawn by hand to the shore, and that there, when dried by the evaporation of the earth and the power of the sun, it is cut into pieces with axes and wedges just as timber or stone would be.
His Book V Chapter 6: The Jews. Their country according to Tacitus

Bitumen
At a certain season of the year the lake throws up bitumen, and the method of collecting it has been taught by that experience which teaches all other arts. It is naturally a fluid of dark colour; when vinegar is sprinkled upon it, it coagulates and floats upon the surface. Those whose business it is take it with the hand, and draw it on to the deck of the boat; it then continues of itself to flow in and lade the vessel till the stream is cut off. Nor can this be done by any instrument of brass or iron
His Book V Chapter 6: The Jews. Their country according to Tacitus

Bladder
Vanquished India gave lynxes to Bacchus of the clustered vines, and, they say that, whatever their bladder emits, changes to stone, and solidifies on contact with air. So coral, also, hardens the first time air touches it: it was a soft plant under the waves.'
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 10: 391-417 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Phoenix

Blood
On the same ground there should be no blood in living creatures, but that it must be formed by the wound, some sort of spirit or flesh being changed into a liquid and flowing matter.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 13: Water problems for Aemilius

Blood
the statues in the temple of Juno Sospita Lanuvium flowed down with blood;
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 31: Decisions are made

Bow
They were the first race of men to string the bow with cords.
Gth Chapter 5: About Scythia.

Bulls
Bury the carcases of sacrificed bulls (it is a known experiment) in the ditch where you have thrown them, and flower-sipping bees, will be born, here and there, from the putrid entrails.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Calendar
For in the beginning they had had a year of ten months
Plt Numa, chapter 18: Calendar reforms by Numa

Calendar
First of all he divided the year into twelve months, corresponding to the moon's revolutions. But as the moon does not complete thirty days in each month, and so there are fewer days in the lunar year than in that measured by the course of the sun, he interpolated intercalary months and so arranged them that every twentieth year the days should coincide with the same position of the sun as when they started, the whole twenty years being thus complete.
Hor Book I Chapter 19: Numa's Religious Institutions.

Calendar
Numa, calculating the difference between the lunar and the solar' year at eleven days, for that the moon completed her anniversary course in three hundred and fifty-four days, and the sun in three hundred and sixty-five, to remedy this incongruity doubled the eleven days, and every other year added an intercalary month, to follow February, consisting of twenty-two days, and called by the Romans the month Mercedinus.
Plt Numa, chapter 18: Calendar reforms by Numa

Calendar
During the reign of Romulus, they had let their months run on without any certain or equal term; some of them contained twenty days, others thirty-five, others more; they had no sort of knowledge of the inequality in the motions of the sun and moon; they only kept to the one rule that the whole course of the year contained three hundred and sixty days.
Plt Numa, chapter 18: Calendar reforms by Numa

Calendar
he reformed the calendar, which the negligence of the pontiffs had long since so disordered, through their privilege of adding months or days at pleasure, that the harvest festivals did not come in summer nor those of the vintage in the autumn; and he adjusted the year to the sun's course by making it consist of three hundred and sixty-five days, abolishing the intercalary month, and adding one day every fourth year
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 40: Julius Caesar reforms the Calendar

Calendar
He restored the calendar, ... and upon that occasion, called the month Sextilis, by his own name, August,
Stn Augustus, Chapter 31: Religious measures.

Camel
25 For it is easier for a camel to go through a needle's eye, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 18.

Camel
I cannot but wonder on this occasion at Sallust, who says that this was the first time camels were seen by the Romans, as if he thought those who, long before, under Scipio, defeated Antiochus, or those who lately had fought against Archelaus near Orchomenus and Chaeronea, had not known what a camel was.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 11: battle of the river Rhyndacus

Camps
The senate commissioned Marcus Atilius, the city praetor, to rid the people of these superstitions. He called an assembly, in which he read the decree of the senate, and gave notice, that all persons who had any books of divination, or forms of prayer, or any written system of sacrificing, should lay all the aforesaid books and writings before him before the calends of April; and that no person should sacrifice in any public or consecrated place according to new or foreign rites.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 1: On Titus Pomponius Veientanus

Captain
The cautious captain's better than the bold.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 25: Military affairs. Cont.

Caresses
Amid the embraces and caresses of his mistresses and other unseemly delays
His Book I Chapter 72: The death of Tigellinus

Castration
He prohibited the castration of males, and kept down the price of the eunuchs that remained in the hands of the slave dealers
Stn Domitian, Chapter 7: His administration

Caterpillars
The caterpillars that are accustomed to weave their white cocoons, on uncultivated leaves (a thing observed by farmers) change to a butterfly's form, symbol of the soul.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Censure
And when Tiberius, in a letter, complained of the affront with great earnestness, he returned him an answer in the following terms: Do not, my dear Tiberius, give way to the ardour of youth in this affair; nor be so indignant that any person should speak ill of me. It is enough, for us, if we can prevent anyone from really doing us mischief.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 51: On insults.

Charity
4 Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth; Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians Chapter 13

Charity
2 And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians Chapter 13

Charity
3 And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians Chapter 13

Childbearing
Among them childbearing was detested, though everywhere else it is desired.
Gth Chapter 8: The Amazones (Cont.)

Children
4 And, ye fathers, provoke not your children to wrath
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Ephesians Chapter 6

Children
21 Fathers, provoke not your children to anger, lest they be discouraged.
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Colossians Chapter 3

Children
The poor were held to pay sufficient to the State if they brought up their children.
Hor Book II Chapter 9: Porsena's Attempt to Restore the Tarquins.

Christian
Philip -- who, with his son Philip, was the only Christian emperor before Constantine
Gth Chapter 8: The Amazones (Cont.)

Christians
Consequently, to get rid of the report, Nero fastened the guilt and the most exquisite tortures on a class hated for their abominations, called Christians by the populace. Christus, from whom the name had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilatus, and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment, again broke out not only in Judaea, the first source of the evil, but even in Rome, where all things hideous and shameful from every part of the world find their centre and become popular. Accordingly, an arrest was first made of all who pleaded guilty; then, upon their information, an immense multitude was convicted, not so much of the crime of firing the city, as of hatred against mankind. Mockery of every sort was added to their deaths. Covered with the skins of beasts, they were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt, to serve as a nightly illumination, when daylight had expired.
Ann Book XV Chapter 44: Prosecution of the Christians

Christians
Every one of you allows his wife to carry everything out of his house to the Galilaeans.
Msp Chapter 26

Christians
Punishment was inflicted on the Christians, a class of men given to a new and mischievous superstition.
Stn Nero, Chapter 16: Punishment of abuses

Cocoons
The caterpillars that are accustomed to weave their white cocoons, on uncultivated leaves (a thing observed by farmers) change to a butterfly's form, symbol of the soul.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Cohort
Vespasian had all but completed the Jewish war, and only the siege of Jerusalem now remained, an operation, the difficulty and arduousness of which was due, rather to the character of its mountain citadel and the perverse obstinacy of the national superstition, than to any sufficient means of enduring extremities left to the besieged.
His Book II Chapter 4: Titus returns (cont.)

Commander
When a commander was slain in battle, those who attended his person fought it out till they all died with him
Plt Sertorius Chapter 14: Sertorius in Spain; his attitude

Copper
Just as molten copper, they say, when poured upon that which is cold and solid, will dissolve and melt it faster than fire itself.
Plt Pompey Chapter 8: Pompey is honoured by Sulla and sent to Gaul

Corruption
So corrupted indeed and debased was that age by sycophancy that not only the foremost citizens who were forced to save their grandeur by servility, but every ex-consul, most of the ex-praetors and a host of inferior senators would rise in eager rivalry to propose shameful and preposterous motions
Ann Book III Chapter 65: Flattered by the Senate

Cow
At Sinuessa a cow brought forth a horse foal.
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 31: Decisions are made

Coward
I should be a greater coward than they make me, if, through fear of idle reproaches, I should abandon my own convictions.
Plt Fabius, Chapter 5: Fabius Cunctator

Dam
Civilis had also thrown a dam obliquely across the Rhine, so that the stream, diverted by the obstacle, might overflow the adjacent country.
His Book V Chapter 14: The Batavian Uprise. Civilis at Castra Vetera

Daughter
A grown-up virgin, of such exquisite beauty, that whichever way she walked she attracted the eyes of everybody.
Hor Book XXVI Chapter 50: The bride of Allucius

Daughter
38 He that giveth her in marriage doeth well; but he that giveth her not in marriage doeth better.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 7

Dead
22 ... let the dead bury their dead.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 8.

Death
All human bodies yield to Death's decree, The soul survives to all eternity.
Plt Romulus, chapter 32: Other disappearences and the after-life

Death
The day before this assassination, he supped with Marcus Lepidus; and as he was signing some letters, according to his custom, as he reclined at table, there arose a question what sort of death was the best. At which he immediately, before anyone could speak, said, "A sudden one."
Plt Caesar Chapter 63: Caesar murdered, prodigies

Deaths
There were closing scenes that equalled the famous deaths of antiquity
His Book I Chapter 3: Introduction (cont.)

Deceit
He employed methods against it which were anything but Roman, namely, fraud and deceit
Hor Book I Chapter 52: Treaty with the Latins.

Deserts
It is the greatest glory to the several states to have as wide deserts as possible around them, their frontiers having been laid waste.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 23: The Germans: their wars.

Die
To die for one's country is, I admit, a glorious thing
Hor Book IX Chapter 4: War with the Samnites. Speech of Lentulus.

Disease
At last he himself was seized with a lingering illness, and that fierce and restless spirit became so broken through bodily weakness, that he who had once thought nothing less fitting for a king than devotion to sacred things, now suddenly became a prey to every sort of religious terror, and filled the City with religious observances.
Hor Book I Chapter 31: Last Years and Death of Tullus.

Divorce
That Aemilia great with child should be, as it were, ravished from the embraces of another for him, and that Antistia should be divorced with dishonor and misery by him, for whose sake she had been but just before bereft of her father.
Plt Pompey Chapter 9: Pompey marries Aemilia

Divorce
his person being highly blamed by his friends, who demanded, Was she not chaste? was she not fair? was she not fruitful? holding out his shoe, asked them, Whether it was not new? and well made? Yet, added he, none of you can tell where it pinches me.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 4: His family

Divorcement
31 It hath been said, Whosoever shall put away his wife, let him give her a writing of divorcement: 32 But I say unto you, That whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of fornication, causeth her to commit adultery: and whosoever shall marry her that is divorced committeth adultery.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 5.

Druids
The Druids do not go to war, nor pay tribute together with the rest; they have an exemption from military service and a dispensation in all matters. Induced by such great advantages, many embrace this profession of their own accord, and [many] are sent to it by their parents and relations. They are said there to learn by heart a great number of verses; accordingly some remain in the course of training twenty years. Nor do they regard it lawful to commit these to writing, though in almost all other matters, in their public and private transactions, they use Greek characters.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 14: The Gauls: the Druids(cont.)

Druids
They wish to inculcate this as one of their leading tenets, that souls do not become extinct, but pass after death from one body to another, and they think that men by this tenet are in a great degree excited to valor, the fear of death being disregarded. They likewise discuss and impart to the youth many things respecting the stars and their motion, respecting the extent of the world and of our earth, respecting the nature of things, respecting the power and the majesty of the immortal gods
Dbg Book VI Chapter 14: The Gauls: the Druids(cont.)

Druids
The Druids declared, with the prophetic utterances of an idle superstition, that this fatal conflagration was a sign of the anger of heaven, and portended universal empire for the Transalpine nations.
His Book IV Chapter 54: Vespasian emperor. Rumours

Druids
The religious rites of the Druids, solemnized with such horrid cruelties, which had only been forbidden the citizens of Rome during the reign of Augustus, he utterly abolished among the Gauls.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Druids
The former are engaged in things sacred, conduct the public and the private sacrifices, and interpret all matters of religion. To these a large number of the young men resort for the purpose of instruction, and they [the Druids] are in great honor among them. For they determine respecting almost all controversies, public and private; and if any crime has been perpetrated, if murder has been committed, if there be any dispute about an inheritance, if any about boundaries, these same persons decide it; they decree rewards and punishments; if any one, either in a private or public capacity, has not submitted to their decision, they interdict him from the sacrifices.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 13: The Gauls: the Druids.

Earth
The opinion of Plato, who, they say, in his later life, conceived that the earth held a lateral position, and that the central and sovereign space was reserved for some nobler body
Plt Numa, chapter 11: Religious reforms by Numa: the Fecials

Eclipses
Aemilius was no novice in these things, nor was ignorant of the nature of the seeming irregularities of eclipses, that in a certain revolution of time, the moon in her course enters the shadow of the earth and is there obscured, till, passing the region of darkness, she is again enlightened by the Sun.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 16: An eclips and a vow

Elections
And now the Roman rites were growing into disuse, not only in private, and within doors, but in public also; in the forum and Capitol there were crowds of women sacrificing, and offering up prayers to the gods, in modes unusual in that country.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 1: On Titus Pomponius Veientanus

Elephant
he once jocosely rebuked a man, by telling him, You present your memorial with as much hesitation as if you were offering money to an elephant.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 53: His modesty.

Elephants
Pompey, it is said, designed to have his triumphant chariot drawn with four elephants, (having brought over several which belonged to the African kings,) but the gates of the city being too narrow, he was forced to desist from that project, and be content with horses.
Plt Pompey Chapter 14: Pompey gets a triumph

Elks
There are also animals] which are called elks. The shape of these, and the varied color of their skins, is much like roes, but in size they surpass them a little and are destitute of horns, and have legs without joints and ligatures; nor do they lie down for the purpose of rest, nor, if they have been thrown down by any accident, can they raise or lift themselves up. Trees serve as beds to them; they lean themselves against them, and thus reclining only slightly, they take their rest; when the huntsmen have discovered from the footsteps of these animals whither they are accustomed to betake themselves, they either undermine all the trees at the roots, or cut into them so far that the upper part of the trees may appear to be left standing. When they have leant upon them, according to their habit, they knock down by their weight the unsupported trees, and fall down themselves along with them.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 27: The Germans: How to catch an Elk.

Empire
To robbery, slaughter, plunder, they give the lying name of empire; they make a solitude and call it peace
Agr Chapter 30: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Galcagus

Engine
And now the Roman rites were growing into disuse, not only in private, and within doors, but in public also; in the forum and Capitol there were crowds of women sacrificing, and offering up prayers to the gods, in modes unusual in that country.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 1: On Titus Pomponius Veientanus

Engine
The senate commissioned Marcus Atilius, the city praetor, to rid the people of these superstitions. He called an assembly, in which he read the decree of the senate, and gave notice, that all persons who had any books of divination, or forms of prayer, or any written system of sacrificing, should lay all the aforesaid books and writings before him before the calends of April; and that no person should sacrifice in any public or consecrated place according to new or foreign rites.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 1: On Titus Pomponius Veientanus

Engine
The senate commissioned Marcus Atilius, the city praetor, to rid the people of these superstitions. He called an assembly, in which he read the decree of the senate, and gave notice, that all persons who had any books of divination, or forms of prayer, or any written system of sacrificing, should lay all the aforesaid books and writings before him before the calends of April; and that no person should sacrifice in any public or consecrated place according to new or foreign rites.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 1: On Titus Pomponius Veientanus

Entertainments
Of these entertainments the most famous for their notorious profligacy were those furnished by Tigellinus, which I will describe as an illustration, that I may not have again and again to narrate similar extravagance. He had a raft constructed on Agrippa's lake, put the guests on board and set it in motion by other vessels towing it. These vessels glittered with gold and ivory; the crews were arranged according to age and experience in vice. Birds beasts had been procured from remote countries, and sea monsters from the ocean. On the margin of the lake were set up brothels crowded with noble ladies, and on the opposite bank were seen naked prostitutes with obscene gestures and movements.
Ann Book XV Chapter 37: A party

Eunuchs
He prohibited the castration of males, and kept down the price of the eunuchs that remained in the hands of the slave dealers
Stn Domitian, Chapter 7: His administration

Faith
1 Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.
Nwt Letter to the Hebrews Chapter 11

Father
Brutus, ... told them he had been competent to pass sentence by himself upon his own sons, but left the rest to the suffrages of the free citizens: "Let every man speak that wishes, and persuade whom he can."
Plt Publicola, chapter 7: The other conspirators are also executed

Fathers
He is also much to be commended for the repeal, or rather amendment, of that law which gives power to fathers to sell their children; he exempted such as were married, conditionally that it had been with the liking and consent of their parents
Plt Numa, chapter 17: Other regulations (cont.)

Fire
When they perceived the tower advanced into contact with the wall they threw upon it a large quantity of fire, making use of blazing firebrands
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 37: Hannibal withdraws from Cumae, Hanno defeated

Fire
Thou shalt not stir the fire with a sword.
Plt Numa, chapter 14: Dialogue with Jupiter

Fish
Men who pursue small advantages with no small hazard, resemble those who fish with a golden hook, the loss of which, if the line should happen to break, could never be compensated by all the fish they might take.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 25: Military affairs. Cont.

Flattery
Tribunes and centurions he knew, oftener reported what was welcome than what was true; freedmen had slavish spirits, friends a love of flattery.
Ann Book II Chapter 12: War with the Germans. Considerations of Germanicus.

Flatulence
It is said, too, that he intended to publish an edict, " allowing to all people the liberty of giving vent at table to any distention occasioned by flatulence," upon hearing of a person whose modesty, when under restraint, had nearly cost him his life.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 32: Entertainments.

Flesh
Oh, how wrong it is for flesh to be made from flesh; for a greedy body to fatten, by swallowing another body; for one creature to live by the death of another creature! So amongst such riches, that earth, the greatest of mothers, yields, you are not happy unless you tear, with cruel teeth, at pitiful wounds, recalling Cyclops' practice, and you cannot satisfy your voracious appetite, and your restless hunger, unless you destroy other life!
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 2: 60-142 Pythagoras' Teachings: Vegetarianism

Flesh
He was the first to denounce the serving of animal flesh at table
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 2: 60-142 Pythagoras' Teachings: Vegetarianism

Foal
At Sinuessa a cow brought forth a horse foal.
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 31: Decisions are made

Fraud
As the state had taken upon itself the risk of any loss which might arise from storms to the commodities conveyed to the armies, not only had these two men fabricated false accounts of shipwrecks, but even those which had really occurred were occasioned by their own knavery, and not by accident. Their plan was to put a few goods of little value into old and shattered vessels, which they sank in the deep, taking up the sailors in boats prepared for the purpose, and then returning falsely the cargo as many times more valuable than it was.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 3: The Appointed people start their work. Posthumius charged.

Fraud
He employed methods against it which were anything but Roman, namely, fraud and deceit
Hor Book I Chapter 52: Treaty with the Latins.

Funeral
Their funerals, considering the state of civilization among the Gauls, are magnificent and costly; and they cast into the fire all things, including living creatures, which they suppose to have been dear to them when alive; and, a little before this period, slaves and dependents, who were ascertained to have been beloved by them, were, after the regular funeral rites were completed, burnt together with them.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 19: The Gauls: their marriages.

Funerals
It became customary for the best men to celebrate the funerals of great citizens with speeches in their commendation.
Plt Publicola, chapter 9: Brutus kills Aruns in battle

Game
His favorite spectacle was the Trojan game acted by a select number of boys, in parties differing in age and station; thinking that it was a practice both excellent in itself, and sanctioned by ancient usage, that the spirit of the young nobles should be displayed in such exercises.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 43: On spectacles.

General
As Theophrastus observes, a general should die like a general, and not like a skirmisher.
Plt Sertorius Chapter 13: Sertorius in Spain; fighting Metellus

Geography
Our ancestors ... were of the opinion that the circle of the whole world was surrounded by the girdle of Ocean on three sides. Its three parts they called Asia, Europe, and Africa.
Gth Chapter 1: Geographical Introduction.

Geography
Every one, as he returned from some far-distant region, told of wonders, of violent hurricanes, and unknown birds, of monsters of the sea, of forms half-human, half beast-like, things they had really seen or in their terror believed.
Ann Book II Chapter 24: War with the Germans. Disaster at sea.

Gladiators
While the gladiators were making their way to it in boats, the Germans swam and outstripped them. A considerable number, as it chanced, had effected the passage,
His Book II Chapter 35: Otho versus Vitellius. An island in the Padus

Glass
The river Belus also flows into the Jewish Sea. About its mouth is a kind of sand which is collected, mixed with nitre, and fused into glass. This shore is of limited extent, but furnishes an inexhaustible supply to the exporter.
His Book V Chapter 7: The Jews. Their country according to Tacitus (cont.)

God
So Numa forbade the Romans to represent God in the form of man or beast, nor was there any painted or graven image of a deity admitted amongst them for the space of the first hundred and seventy years, all which time their temples and chapels were kept free and pure from images
Plt Numa, chapter 8: Religious reforms by Numa

Gods
If gods their help withhold, t is impious to be brave.
Vrg Book II Chapter 17: Fight about Cassandra

Gods
Religion, that it is the science of worshipping the gods.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 2: As an augur.

Gods
The gods never lay hands themselves on the guilty; it is enough when they arm the injured with the opportunity for vengeance.
Hor Book V Chapter 11: Trial of Sergius and Verginius

Gods
At length it was discovered why the gods were visiting men for neglected ceremonies and religious duties unperformed. It was in fact due to nothing else but the fact that there was a flaw in the election of the magistrates, and consequently they had not proclaimed the Festival of the Latin League, the sacrifice on the Alban Mount with the due formalities.
Hor Book V Chapter 17: War with Veii. Cont.

Gods
Never surely did more terrible calamities of the Roman People, or evidence more conclusive, prove that the Gods take no thought for our happiness, but only for our punishment.
His Book I Chapter 3: Introduction (cont.)

Gold
Silver and gold the Gods have denied them, whether in mercy or in wrath, I am unable to determine
Ger Chapter 5: The country

Golden
Men who pursue small advantages with no small hazard, resemble those who fish with a golden hook, the loss of which, if the line should happen to break, could never be compensated by all the fish they might take.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 25: Military affairs. Cont.

Grain
[he] reduced the number of those who received grain at public expense from three hundred and twenty thousand to one hundred and fifty thousand.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 41: Julius Caesar Dictator

Gratitude
Gratitude is a burden, while there seems to be a profit in revenge.
His Book IV Chapter 3: Vespasian appointed to emperor

Gratitude
For benefits received are a delight to us as long as we think we can requite them; when that possibility is far exceeded, they are repaid with hatred instead of gratitude.
Ann Book IV Chapter 18: Complot against Agrippina. Silius and Sabinus

Hair
14 Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him?
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians Chapter 11

Hairs
7 But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 12.

Hardships
Hardships may be endured, whereas we are spoiled by success.
His Book I Chapter 15: Galba looks for a successor. Piso adopted

Harpies
No prodigy more vile than these.
Vrg Book III Chapter 10: Prophecy of Celaeno the Harpy

Harpies
Birds seem they, but with face like woman-kind; foul-flowing bellies, hands with crooked claws, and ghastly lips they have, with hunger pale.
Vrg Book III Chapter 10: Prophecy of Celaeno the Harpy

Hatred
The usual hatred of neighbours.
His Book V Chapter 1: The Jewish War

Health
Some, however, thought that its old arrangement had been more conducive to health, inasmuch as the narrow streets with the elevation of the roofs were not equally penetrated by the sun's heat, while now the open space, unsheltered by any shade, was scorched by a fiercer glow.
Ann Book XV Chapter 43: The rebuilding of Rome

Heart
Do you think that I have acted my part on the stage of life well?
Stn Augustus, Chapter 99: His last words.

Heart
21 For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 6.

Heaven
When earth has benefited from him, the celestial regions will enjoy him, and heaven will be his goal.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 11: 418-452 Pythagoras' Teachings:Transfers of Power

History
But in questions of such remote antiquity I should count it sufficient if what bears the stamp of probability be taken as true. Statements like this, which are more fitted to adorn a stage which delights in the marvellous than to inspire belief, it is not worth while either to affirm or deny.
Hor Book V Chapter 21: Conquest and Plunder of Veii.

Hornets
A war-horse dug into the earth is the source of hornets:
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Horse
He rode a remarkable horse, too, with feet that were almost human; for its hoofs were cloven in such a way as to look like toes.
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 61: His horse.

Horse
Besides a stall of marble, a manger of ivory, purple blankets and a collar of precious stones he even gave this horse [Incitatus] a house, a troop of slaves and furniture, for the more elegant entertainment of the guests invited in his name; and it is also said that he planned to make him consul.
Stn Caligula, Chapter 55: Caligula and the circus.

Horse-races
Have you a passion for horse-races? There is one in Homer, very cleverly described.
Msp Chapter 12

Hunger
All usual and even unusual kinds of food failed them, for they had consumed their horses and beasts of burden and all the other animals, which, though unclean and disgusting, necessity compelled them to use. At last they tore up shrubs and roots and the grass that grew between the stones, and thus shewed an example of patience under privations,
His Book IV Chapter 60: The Batavian Uprise. The camp falls and is plundered

Hyena
We might marvel at how the hyena changes function, and a moment ago a female, taken from behind by a male, is now a male.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 10: 391-417 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Phoenix

Image of Memnon
The stone image of Memnon, which, when struck by the sun's rays, gives out the sound of a human voice
Ann Book II Chapter 61: Germanicus goes East. To Egypt (cont.)

Injustice
Vitia, an aged woman, mother of Fufius Geminus, was executed for bewailing the death of her son.
Ann Book VI Chapter 10: The fall of Sejanus. Further consequences (cont.)

Injustice
There is some injustice in every great precedent, which, though injurious to individuals, has its compensation in the public advantage.
Ann Book XIV Chapter 44: Murder of Pedanius Secundus. Speech of Gaius Cassius (cont.)

Intermarriage
The intermarriage of patricians and plebeians. The patricians considered that their blood would be contaminated by it and the special rights of the houses thrown into confusion (1)
Hor Book IV Chapter 1: The intermarriage problem

Judge
1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 7.

Knowledge
52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 11.

Knowledge
2 And if any man think that he knoweth any thing, he knoweth nothing
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 8

Land-crabs
If you remove the hollow claws of land-crabs, and put the rest under the soil, a scorpion, with its curved and threatening tail, will emerge from the parts interred:
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Law
But if human law leaves no rights which the weak share with the stronger, I can still fly to the gods, the avengers of intolerable tyranny,
Hor Book IX Chapter 1: War with the Samnites. Speech of Pontius.

Laws
Mankind in the earliest age lived for a time without a single vicious impulse, without shame or guilt, and, consequently, without punishment and restraints
Ann Book III Chapter 26: On laws

Laws
Commissioners were sent to to Athens with instructions to make a copy of the famous laws of Solon, and to investigate the institutions, customs, and laws of other Greek States
Hor Book III Chapter 31: War with the Aequi.

Lawyers
52 Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 11.

Libation
When a commander was slain in battle, those who attended his person fought it out till they all died with him
Plt Sertorius Chapter 14: Sertorius in Spain; his attitude

Liberty
So difficult is it to observe moderation in the defence of liberty, while each man under the pretence of equality raises himself only by keeping others down, and by their very precautions against fear men make themselves feared, and in repelling injury from ourselves we inflict it on others as though there were no alternative between doing wrong and suffering it.
Hor Book III Chapter 65: Fresh Internal Dissensions.

Life
14 ... For what is your life? It is even a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away.
Nwt Letter of James Chapter 4

Lightning
He had so great a dread of thunder and lightning that he always carried about him a seal's skin by way of preservation.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 90: Dread of thunder.

Lions
his having chariots drawn by lions
Plt Antony Chapter 9: In Rome

Luxury
The removal of all danger from without would induce his subjects to luxuriate in idleness, as they would be no longer restrained by the fear of an enemy or by military discipline. To prevent this, he strove to inculcate in their minds the fear of the gods, regarding this as the most powerful influence which could act upon an uncivilised and, in those ages, a barbarous people. But, as this would fail to make a deep impression without some claim to supernatural wisdom, he pretended that he had nocturnal interviews with the nymph Egeria: that it was on her advice that he was instituting the ritual most acceptable to the gods and appointing for each deity his own special priests.
Hor Book I Chapter 19: Numa's Religious Institutions.

Luxury
It was decided that vessels of solid gold should not be made for the serving of food, and that men should not disgrace themselves with silken clothing from the East
Ann Book II Chapter 33: On luxury.

Lynxes
Vanquished India gave lynxes to Bacchus of the clustered vines, and, they say that, whatever their bladder emits, changes to stone, and solidifies on contact with air. So coral, also, hardens the first time air touches it: it was a soft plant under the waves.'
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 10: 391-417 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Phoenix

Machine
Peculiar consternation was caused by a machine, which, being poised in the air over the heads of the enemy, suddenly descended, and carried up one or more of them past the faces of their friends, and then, by a shifting of the weights, projected them within the limits of the camp.
His Book IV Chapter 30: The Batavian Uprise. Engines

Machines
Images and figures of victory were introduced by the motion of machines
Plt Sertorius Chapter 22: Sertorius in Spain; complots.

Magical rites
And certainly there were found hidden in the floor and in the walls disinterred remains of human bodies, incantations and spells, and the name of Germanicus inscribed on leaden tablets, half-burnt cinders smeared with blood, and other horrors by which in popular belief souls are devoted so the infernal deities.
Ann Book II Chapter 69: Illness and death of Germanicus. Piso's actions.

Magicians
Decrees of the Senate were also passed to expel from Italy astrologers and magicians
Ann Book II Chapter 32: Prosecutions for Majestas. Libo Drusus (cont.)

Marble
The Cicones have a river, whose waters when drunk turn the vital organs to stone, and that change things to marble when touched.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 8: 307-360 Pythagoras' Teachings:Physical changes

Marriage
What other result would mixed marriages have except to make unions between patricians and plebeians almost like the promiscuous association of animals? The offspring of such marriages would not know whose blood flowed in his veins, what sacred rites he might perform; half of him patrician, half plebeian, he would not even be in harmony with himself.
Hor Book IV Chapter 2: The intermarriage problem (Cont.)

Marrow
There are those who believe that when the spine decomposes, interred in the tomb, human marrow forms a snake.'
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Mathematics
the perfection of the number three, as being the first of odd numbers, the first that contains in itself multiplication, with all other properties whatsoever belonging to numbers in general.
Plt Fabius, Chapter 4: Fabius dictator. His religious acts

Matrons
The matrons received public thanks, and the distinction was conferred upon them of having funeral orations pronounced over them as in the case of men.
Hor Book V Chapter 50: Invasion of the Gauls. The Rebuilding of Rome -- Regulations

Medicine
He conferred citizenship on all who practiced medicine at Rome, and on all teachers of the liberal arts
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 42: Julius Caesar Dictator. Legislation.

Menstrua
It shrinks from blood or any cloth stained by the menstrua of women.
His Book V Chapter 6: The Jews. Their country according to Tacitus

Mercenary
It is best to have a mercenary soldier fond of money and of pleasures, for thus he will fight the more boldly, to procure the means to gratify his desires
Plt Galba Chapter 1: Introduction

Messias
There was a firm persuasion, that in the ancient records of their priests was contained a prediction of how at this very time the East was to grow powerful, and rulers, coming from Judaea, were to acquire universal empire. These mysterious prophecies had pointed to Vespasian and Titus, but the common people, with the usual blindness of ambition, had interpreted these mighty destinies of themselves, and could not be brought even by disasters to believe the truth.
His Book V Chapter 13: Jewish-Roman War. The siege of Jerusalem (cont.)

Military discipline
My natural love of my children and that proof of courage which from a false sense of honour you have given, move me to take your part, but since either the consuls' authority must be vindicated by your death or forever abrogated by letting you go unpunished, I would believe that even you yourself, if there is a drop of my blood in your veins, will not shrink from restoring by your punishment the military discipline which has been weakened by your misconduct.
Hor Book VIII Chapter 7: The Revolt of the Latins and Campanians. Titus Manlius.

Minerva's pool
There is a tale of men in Hyperborean Pallene, who are used to clothing their bodies in soft plumage, by plunging nine times in Minerva's pool
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 8: 307-360 Pythagoras' Teachings:Physical changes

Money
10 For the love of money is the root of all evil.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Timotheus Chapter 6

Moon
Aemilius was no novice in these things, nor was ignorant of the nature of the seeming irregularities of eclipses, that in a certain revolution of time, the moon in her course enters the shadow of the earth and is there obscured, till, passing the region of darkness, she is again enlightened by the Sun.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 16: An eclips and a vow

Morality
There may be moral revolutions just as there are changes of seasons.
Ann Book III Chapter 55: Against luxury (cont.)

Morality
I have to present in succession the merciless biddings of a tyrant, incessant prosecutions, faithless friendships, the ruin of innocence, the same causes issuing in the same results, and I am everywhere confronted by a wearisome monotony in my subject matte
Ann Book IV Chapter 33: More reflections

Morality
As it was, the morality of their fathers, which had by degrees been forgotten, was utterly subverted by the introduction of a lax tone, so that all which could suffer or produce corruption was to be seen at Rome, and a degeneracy bred by foreign tastes was infecting the youth who devoted themselves to athletic sports, to idle loungings and low intrigues, with the encouragement of the emperor and Senate, who not only granted licence to vice, but even applied a compulsion to drive Roman nobles into disgracing themselves on the stage, under the pretence of being orators and poets
Ann Book XIV Chapter 20: Nero as an artist (cont.)

Mother
As soon as he heard of his mother's death, he had almost cast away himself and died for grief; for he lay seven days together continually in his tent, without giving the word, or being seen by the nearest of his friends
Plt Sertorius Chapter 22: Sertorius in Spain; complots.

Mourning
A child of three years was not to be mourned for at all; one older, up to ten years, for as many months as it was years old; and the longest time of mourning for any person whatsoever was not to exceed the term of ten months; which was the time appointed for women that lost their husbands to continue in widowhood.
Plt Numa, chapter 12: Religious reforms by Numa: the Salii

Murder
But Piso refused, alleging the odium of an act which would stain with an emperor's blood, however bad he might be, the sanctity of the hospitable board and the deities who preside over it.
Ann Book XV Chapter 52: The conspiracy of Piso. Plans

Murder
It was only the desire of escape, that foe to all great enterprises, which held him back.
Ann Book XV Chapter 50: The conspiracy of Piso. More conspirators

Murderers
Their heads having been discovered and purchased from the murderers, who had reserved them for sale.
His Book I Chapter 47: Revolt of Otho. Appointment of Otho

New Testament
Finding the Cyrenians harassed by long tyrannies and wars, he composed their troubles, and settled their government; putting the city in mind of that saying which Plato once had oracularly uttered of them, who, being requested to prescribe laws to them, and mold them into some sound form of government, made answer, that it was a hard thing to give laws to the Cyrenians, abounding, as they did, in wealth and plenty. For nothing is more intractable than man when in felicity, nor anything more docile, when he has been reduced and humbled by fortune.
Plt Lucullus Chapter 2: Lucullus assists Sulla

Nitre
The river Belus also flows into the Jewish Sea. About its mouth is a kind of sand which is collected, mixed with nitre, and fused into glass. This shore is of limited extent, but furnishes an inexhaustible supply to the exporter.
His Book V Chapter 7: The Jews. Their country according to Tacitus (cont.)

Nobility
Even if there existed a republic of wise men, which the learned rather imagine than know of for my own part I cannot persuade myself that there could possibly be a nobility of sounder judgment, and more moderate in their desire of power, or a people better moralled. Indeed that a century of juniors should have been willing to consult their elders, as to the persons to whom they should intrust a command by their vote, is rendered scarcely probable by the contempt and levity with which the parental authority is treated by children in the present age.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 22: The siege of Capua is getting more serious

Oath
12 But above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by the earth, neither by any other oath: but let your yea be yea; and your nay, nay;
Nwt Letter of James Chapter 5

Oaths
But the neglect of the gods, which prevails in this age, had not yet appeared, nor did every man interpret oaths and laws in just the sense which suited him best; he preferred to shape his own conduct by their requirements.
Hor Book III Chapter 20: The levy of Lucius Quinctius

Ocean
But the impassable farther bounds of Ocean not only has no one attempted to describe, but no man has been allowed to reach; for by reason of obstructing seaweed and the failing of the winds it is plainly inaccessible and is unknown to any save to Him who made it.
Gth Chapter 1: Geographical Introduction.

Omens
Furius Camillus Scribonianus, his legate in Dalmatia, broke into rebellion, but was reduced in the space of five days; the legions which he had seduced from their oath of fidelity relinquishing their purpose, upon an alarm occasioned by ill omens. For when orders were given them to march, to meet their new emperor, the eagles could not be decorated, nor the standards pulled out of the ground, whether it was by accident, or a divine interposition.
Stn Claudius, Chapter 13: Conspiracies.

Omens
As for the hidden decrees of fate, the omens and the oracles that marked out Vespasian and his sons for imperial power, we believed in them only after his success.
His Book I Chapter 10: Galba becomes emperor. The East

Omens
Prodigies had occurred, which this nation, prone to superstition, but hating all religious rites, did not deem it lawful to expiate by offering and sacrifice
His Book V Chapter 13: Jewish-Roman War. The siege of Jerusalem (cont.)

Oracles
As for the hidden decrees of fate, the omens and the oracles that marked out Vespasian and his sons for imperial power, we believed in them only after his success.
His Book I Chapter 10: Galba becomes emperor. The East

Orphan
The early loss of a father may be attended with other disadvantages, yet it can hinder none from being either virtuous or eminent in the world, and that it is no obstacle to true goodness and excellence;
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 1: His youth

Orthography
We ought to write as we speak
Stn Augustus, Chapter 88: His spelling.

Parental
Indeed that a century of juniors should have been willing to consult their elders, as to the persons to whom they should intrust a command by their vote, is rendered scarcely probable by the contempt and levity with which the parental authority is treated by children in the present age.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 22: The siege of Capua is getting more serious

Patricians
They would rob you of your share in this daylight, if they could. They are indignant because you breathe and utter speech and wear the form of men. Why! Heaven forgive me, they actually say that it would be an act of impiety for a plebeian to be made consul!
Hor Book IV Chapter 3: The intermarriage problem (Cont.)

Patricians
I fancy, Quirites, that I have often noticed in the past how greatly the patricians despise you, how unworthy they deem you to live in the same City, within the same walls, as they
Hor Book IV Chapter 3: The intermarriage problem (Cont.)

Patricians
Have you never heard the remark that it was not men sent down from heaven who were originally created patricians, but those who could cite a father, which is nothing more than saying that they were freeborn.
Hor Book X Chapter 8: The Ogulnian Law (Cont.)

Philosopher
The sole and only hope of respite or remedy for human evils was in some happy conjunction of events, which should unite in a single person the power of a king and the wisdom of a philosopher,
Plt Numa, chapter 20: No war during the reign of Numa.

Philosophy
8 Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Colossians Chapter 2

Phoenix
They say that, from the father's body, a young phoenix is reborn, destined to live the same number of years.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 10: 391-417 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Phoenix

Phoenix
There is one, a bird, which renews itself, and reproduces from itself. The Assyrians call it the phoenix. It does not live on seeds and herbs, but on drops of incense, and the sap of the cardamom plant.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 10: 391-417 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Phoenix

Phoenix
The bird called the phoenix, after a long succession of ages, appeared in Egypt and furnished the most learned men of that country and of Greece with abundant matter for the discussion of the marvellous phenomenon. It is my wish to make known all on which they agree with several things, questionable enough indeed, but not too absurd to be noticed. That it is a creature sacred to the sun, differing from all other birds in its beak and in the tints of its plumage, is held unanimously by those who have described its nature. As to the number of years it lives, there are various accounts. The general tradition says five hundred years.
Ann Book VI Chapter 28: The phoenix

Phoenix
For when the number of years is completed and death is near, the phoenix, it is said, builds a nest in the land of its birth and infuses into it a germ of life from which an offspring arises, whose first care, when fledged, is to bury its father. This is not rashly done, but taking up a load of myrrh and having tried its strength by a long flight, as soon as it is equal to the burden and to the journey, it carries its father's body, bears it to the altar of the Sun, and leaves it to the flames. All this is full of doubt and legendary exaggeration. Still, there is no question that the bird is occasionally seen in Egypt.
Ann Book VI Chapter 28: The phoenix

Physician
23 ... Physician heal thyself:
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 4.

Piety
They talk of an impious act having been done, and they do it themselves.
His Book III Chapter 25: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. The battle goes on

Plebeians
Have you never heard the remark that it was not men sent down from heaven who were originally created patricians, but those who could cite a father, which is nothing more than saying that they were freeborn.
Hor Book X Chapter 8: The Ogulnian Law (Cont.)

Plebeians
Marcellus was elected with the greatest unanimity, and was immediately to enter upon his office, but as it thundered while he entered upon it, the augurs were summoned, who pronounced that they considered the creation formal, and the fathers spread a report that the gods were displeased, because on that occasion, for the first time, two plebeians had been elected consuls.
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 31: Decisions are made

Poison
Do you think that I have acted my part on the stage of life well?
Stn Augustus, Chapter 99: His last words.

Politics
Liberty, they urged, possessed fascination enough in itself; unless kings defend their authority with as much energy as their subjects show in quest of liberty, all things come to a dead level, there will be no one thing preeminent or superior to all else in the State; there will soon be an end of kingly power, which is the most beautiful thing, whether amongst gods or amongst mortal men.
Hor Book II Chapter 9: Porsena's Attempt to Restore the Tarquins.

Politics
Now that all were equal before the law, they missed their former licence and complained that the liberty which others enjoyed had become slavery for them; as long as there was a king, there was a person from whom they could get what they wanted, whether lawful or not, there was room for personal influence and kindness, he could show severity or indulgence, could discriminate between his friends and his enemies.
Hor Book II Chapter 3: A Conspiracy to Restore the Tarquins.

Politics
In Rome the greatest rewards are won by seditious agitations, these have always brought honour to men both individually and in the mass. Those present should reflect upon the greatness and dignity of the senate as they had received it from their fathers, and consider what they were going to hand on to their children, in order that they might be able to feel pride in the extension and growth of its influence, as the plebs felt pride in theirs.
Hor Book IV Chapter 2: The intermarriage problem (Cont.)

Politics
As nothing could unite them into one political body but the observance of common laws and customs, he gave them a body of laws, which he thought would only be respected by a rude and uncivilised race of men if he inspired them with awe by assuming the outward symbols of power.
Hor Book I Chapter 8: The Political Constitution.

Politics
Rome was not a monarchy, but a free City, and they had made up their minds to open their gates even to an enemy sooner than to a king. It was the universal wish that whatever put an end to liberty in the City should put an end to the City itself
Hor Book II Chapter 15: Final Attempt to restore the Tarquins (Cont.)

Politics
Every one waiting for some bold demonstration from his neighbour, in obedience to that innate tendency of men, which makes them quick to follow where they are slow to lead.
His Book I Chapter 55: Revolt of Vitellius. Oath of fidelity

Politics
When our plans are developed it will be easy enough to fit words to facts.
Hor Book VIII Chapter 4: The Revolt of the Latins and Campanians. Speech of Annius.

Politics
In a state of moderate dimensions equality was easily preserved; but when the world had been subdued, when all rival kings and cities had been destroyed, and men had leisure to covet wealth which they might enjoy in security, the early conflicts between the patricians and the people were kindled into flame.
His Book II Chapter 38: Otho versus Vitellius. Passion for power

Politics
Yet I account this the greatest of all misfortunes, if indeed the affairs of Rome be sunk to so feeble a state as to have their last dependence upon us.
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 33: The women of Rome appeal to Veturia and Volumnia

Politics
This compels me to doubt whether the liking of princes for some men and their antipathy to others depend, like other contingencies, on a fate and destiny to which we are born, or, to some degree, on our own plans; so that it is possible to pursue a course between a defiant independence and a debasing servility, free from ambition and its perils.
Ann Book IV Chapter 20: Complot against Agrippina. Silius (cont.)

Politics
It had been the ancient policy of the founders of cities to get together a multitude of people of obscure and low origin and then to spread the fiction that they were the children of the soil.
Hor Book I Chapter 8: The Political Constitution.

Politics
It is the greatest glory to the several states to have as wide deserts as possible around them, their frontiers having been laid waste.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 23: The Germans: their wars.

Politics
He had never learned how essential it is for any one who undertakes public business, and desires to deal with mankind, to avoid above all things that self-will, which, as Plato says, belongs to the family of solitude; and to pursue, above all things, that capacity so generally ridiculed, of submission to ill treatment.
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 15: He is not chosen.

Politics
When I hear of these and like occurrences, I suspend my judgment on the question whether it is fate and unchangeable necessity or chance which governs the revolutions of human affairs. Indeed, among the wisest of the ancients and among their disciples you will find conflicting theories, many holding the conviction that heaven does not concern itself with the beginning or the end of our life, or, in short, with mankind at all; and that therefore sorrows are continually the lot of the good, happiness of the wicked; while others, on the contrary, believe that though there is a harmony between fate and events, yet it is not dependent on wandering stars, but on primary elements, and on a combination of natural causes.
Ann Book VI Chapter 22: On fate

Politics
When a ruler once becomes unpopular, all his acts, be they good or bad, tell against him
His Book I Chapter 7: Galba becomes emperor. Executions

Politics
And so one is all the more inclined to laugh at the stupidity of men who suppose that the despotism of the present can actually efface the remembrances of the next generation. On the contrary, the persecution of genius fosters its influence; foreign tyrants, and all who have imitated their oppression, have merely procured infamy for themselves and glory for their victims.
Ann Book IV Chapter 35: Prosecutions for Majestas. Cordus (cont.)

Pray
7 Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you: 8 For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 7.

Priestess
A law however was passed that the priestess, in regard to her sacred functions, was to be under the husband's control, but in other respects to retain the ordinary legal position of women.
Ann Book IV Chapter 16: Appointment of a priest

Prophet
44 A prophet hath no honour in his own country.
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 4.

Prophet
33 Nevertheless I must walk to day, and to morrow, and the day following: for it cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 13.

Prophetical
He then caused all prophetical books, both in Latin and Greek, the authors of which were either unknown, or of no great authority, to be brought in; and the whole collection, amounting to upwards of two thousand volumes, he committed to the flames, preserving only the Sibylline oracles;
Stn Augustus, Chapter 31: Religious measures.

Prophets
34 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not!
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 13.

Prostitutes
Cowards, and sluggards, and unnatural prostitutes they smother in mud and bogs under an heap of hurdles
Ger Chapter 12: Justice

Pugilistic
He took particular pleasure in witnessing pugilistic contests.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 45: His personal interest.

Punishment
The immortal gods are wont to allow those persons whom they wish to punish for their guilt sometimes a greater prosperity and longer impunity, in order that they may suffer the more severely from a reverse of circumstances
Dbg Book I Chapter 14: March of the Helvetii. Caesar's reply.

Punishments
Amongst other things which are the glory of Rome is this, that no nation has ever been contented with milder punishments.
Hor Book I Chapter 28: The treachery of Mettius Fufetius. (Cont.)

Rabboni
47 Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 1.

Religion
Religion, that it is the science of worshipping the gods.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 2: As an augur.

Revolt
Better imbrue your hands in my blood: it will be less guilt to slay your commander than it is to be in revolt from the emperor. Either living I will uphold the loyalty of the legions, or pierced to the heart I will hasten on your repentance.
Ann Book I Chapter 18: Revolt in Pannonia. Blaesus

Rich/Poor
15 ... for a man's life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 12.

Rich/Poor
25 For it is easier for a camel to go through a needle's eye, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 18.

Rich/Poor
24 But woe unto you that are rich! for ye have received your consolation.
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 6.

Rich/Poor
11 He that hath two coats, let him impart to him that hath none
Nwt Gospel of Luke Chapter 3.

Rich/Poor
8 the poor always ye have with you;
Nwt Gospel of John Chapter 12.

Rich/Poor
1 Go to now, ye rich men, weep and howl for your miseries that shall come upon you.
Nwt Letter of James Chapter 5

Robbery
To robbery, slaughter, plunder, they give the lying name of empire; they make a solitude and call it peace
Agr Chapter 30: Agricola in Britain. Speech of Galcagus

Sabbath
We are told that the rest of the seventh day was adopted, because this day brought with it a termination of their toils; after a while the charm of indolence beguilded them into giving up the seventh year also to inaction. But others say that it is an observance in honour of Saturn, either from the primitive elements of their faith having been transmitted from the Idaei, who are said to have shared the flight of that God, and to have founded the race, or from the circumstance that of the seven stars which rule the destinies of men Saturn moves in the highest orbit and with the mightiest power, and that many of the heavenly bodies complete their revolutions and courses in multiples of seven.
His Book V Chapter 4: The Jews. Their religion according to Tacitus

Sacred Books
In the other were the books before mentioned, which the praetor Petilius having read and perused, made oath in the senate, that, in his opinion, it was not fit for their contents to be made public to the people; whereupon the volumes were all carried to the Comitium, and there burnt.
Plt Numa, chapter 22: Numa's funeral and successor.

Sacrifice
When thou sacrificest to the celestial gods, let it be with an odd number, and when to the terrestrial, with even.
Plt Numa, chapter 14: Dialogue with Jupiter

Senators
Unseemly language should not be used towards senators, but to return their insults in kind is proper and lawful"
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 9: Vespasian emperor (cont.)

Sex
We might marvel at how the hyena changes function, and a moment ago a female, taken from behind by a male, is now a male.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 10: 391-417 Pythagoras' Teachings:The Phoenix

She-bear
The cub that a she-bear has just produced is not a cub but a scarcely living lump of flesh: the mother gives it a body, by licking it, and shapes it into a form like that she has herself.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Sirens
What was the name of Achilles among the maidens? What were the Sirens in the habit of singing?
Stn Tiberius Chapter 70: Interest in literature.

Slavery
If you Romans choose to lord it over the world, does it follow that the world is to accept slavery?
Ann Book XII Chapter 37: Problems in Britain. Caractacus (cont.)

Slaves
If a master were murdered by his slaves, all those who were enfranchised by his will and lived under the same roof, were to suffer the capital punishment with his other slaves.
Ann Book XIII Chapter 32: Pomponia Graecina

Slaves
9 Exhort servants to be obedient unto their own masters, and to please them well in all things
Nwt Letter of Paul to Titus Chapter 2

Slaves
There were slaves whose fidelity defied even torture.
His Book I Chapter 3: Introduction (cont.)

Slaves
Ancient custom required that the whole slave-establishment which had dwelt under the same roof should be dragged to execution
Ann Book XIV Chapter 42: Murder of Pedanius Secundus. Kill all his slaves?

Slaves
For the Romans treated their slaves with great humanity in these times, when, working and laboring themselves, and living together among them, they naturally were more gentle and familiar with them.
Plt Coriolanus, Chapter 24: Titus Latinius

Slaves
How ready these men are to be slaves.
Ann Book III Chapter 65: Flattered by the Senate

Soldier
A private cavalry soldier declared he had slain his brother in the late battle, and claimed a reward from the generals.
His Book III Chapter 51: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. On civil wars

Soldiery
The soldiery of the capital, who were imbued with the spirit of an old allegiance to the Caesars, and who had been led to desert Nero by intrigues and influences from without rather than by their own feelings, were inclined for change, when they found that the donative promised in Galba's name was withheld,
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Soldiery
To all this was added Galba's own expression, "I choose my soldiers, I do not buy them," noble words for the common-wealth, but fraught with peril for himself.
His Book I Chapter 5: Revolt of Nymphidius Sabinus

Soothsayers
There were no soothsayers to consult as to how to expiate them, owing to the hostile attitude of the Etruscans,
Hor Book V Chapter 15: War with Veii. The Rise of the Alban Lake. Mission to Delphi.

Soul
For the most perfect soul is a dry light, which flies out of the body as lightning breaks from a cloud; but that which is clogged and surfeited with body is like gross and humid incense, slow to kindle and ascend.
Plt Romulus, chapter 32: Other disappearences and the after-life

Soul
All human bodies yield to Death's decree, The soul survives to all eternity.
Plt Romulus, chapter 32: Other disappearences and the after-life

Soul
All human bodies yield to Death's decree, The soul survives to all eternity.
Plt Romulus, chapter 32: Other disappearences and the after-life

Spine
There are those who believe that when the spine decomposes, interred in the tomb, human marrow forms a snake.'
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Spirit
Everything changes, nothing dies: the spirit wanders, arriving here or there, and occupying whatever body it pleases, passing from a wild beast into a human being, from our body into a beast, but is never destroyed.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 3: 143-175 Pythagoras' Teachings: Metempsychosis

Stones
They make a huge pile of timber; and as soon as a strong wind fit for exciting the flames arose, they set fire to it, and, pouring vinegar on the heated stones, they render them soft and crumbling.
Hor Book XXI Chapter 37: A rock has to be removed.

Sun
The sun appeared unusually red and blood-like.
Hor Book XXV Chapter 3: The Appointed people start their work. Posthumius charged.

Swan
Just as the swan sings once, in dying, its own funeral song
Ovd Ovid XIV Chapter 7: 397-434 The fate of Canens

Sword
This will make him consul, if ye will not
Stn Augustus, Chapter 26: As a consul.

Taxes
He exonerated for ever the people of Troy from the payment of taxes, as being the founders of the Roman race;
Stn Claudius, Chapter 25: Administration of justice (cont.)

Taxes
It was resolved, therefore, that Fulvius, the praetor, should present himself to the public assembly of the people, point out the necessities of the state, and exhort those persons who had increased their patrimonies by farming the public revenues, to furnish temporary loans for the service of that state, from which they had derived their wealth, and contract to supply what was necessary for the army in Spain, on the condition of being paid the first when there was money in the treasury.
Hor Book XXIII Chapter 48: Shortages in Rome and the provinces

Theatre
Next, after various and usually fruitless complaints from the praetors, the emperor finally brought forward a motion about the licentious behaviour of the players. "They had often," he said, "sought to disturb the public peace, and to bring disgrace on private families, and the old Oscan farce once a wretched amusement for the vulgar, had become at once so indecent and so popular, that it must be checked by the Senate's authority. The players, upon this, were banished from Italy.
Ann Book IV Chapter 14: Embassies from Greece

Toilets
When Titus found fault with him for contriving a tax upon public toilets, he held a piece of money from the first payment to his son's nose, asking whether its odor was offensive to him. When Titus said "No," he replied, "Yet it comes from urine.
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 23: Wit

Tongue
6 And the tongue is a fire, a world of iniquity: so is the tongue among our members, that it defileth the whole body, and setteth on fire the course of nature; and it is set on fire of hell.
Nwt Letter of James Chapter 3

Treasure
21 For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 6.

Tribunes
So painful to me, Quirites, are controversies with the tribunes of the plebs, that all the time I lived at Ardea my one consolation in my bitter exile was that I was far removed from these conflicts
Hor Book V Chapter 51: The Speech of Camillus against migrating to Veii.

Triumph
As he rode through the Velabrum on the day of his Gallic triumph, the axle of his chariot broke, and he was all but thrown out;
Stn Julius Caesar, Chapter 37: The Civil war, comment.

Tyranny
But if human law leaves no rights which the weak share with the stronger, I can still fly to the gods, the avengers of intolerable tyranny,
Hor Book IX Chapter 1: War with the Samnites. Speech of Pontius.

Unfaithful
Lepidus upon this being driven out of Italy, fled to Sardinia, where he fell sick and died of sorrow, not for his public misfortunes, as they say, but, upon the discovery of a letter, proving his wife to have been unfaithful to him.
Plt Pompey Chapter 16: Pompey and Lepidus

Universe
If you remove the hollow claws of land-crabs, and put the rest under the soil, a scorpion, with its curved and threatening tail, will emerge from the parts interred:
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 9: 361-390 Pythagoras' Teachings:Autogenesis

Uri
There is a third kind, consisting of those animals which are called uri. These are a little below the elephant in size, and of the appearance, color, and shape of a bull. Their strength and speed are extraordinary; they spare neither man nor wild beast which they have espied.
Dbg Book VI Chapter 28: The Germans: The Uri.

Urine
When Titus found fault with him for contriving a tax upon public toilets, he held a piece of money from the first payment to his son's nose, asking whether its odor was offensive to him. When Titus said "No," he replied, "Yet it comes from urine.
Stn Vespasian, Chapter 23: Wit

Vatican
The notoriously pestilential neighbourhood of the Vatican.
His Book II Chapter 93: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius' army

Vestal Virgins
To the Vestal Virgins he granted seats in the theatre, reserved for them only, opposite the praetor's bench.
Stn Augustus, Chapter 44: On seats at the public games.

Vestals
If in their walks they chance to meet a criminal on his way to execution, it saves his life, upon oath made that the meeting was an accidental one, and not concerted or of set purpose.
Plt Numa, chapter 10: Religious reforms by Numa: Vestals

Vestals
They had power to make a will in the lifetime of their father;
Plt Numa, chapter 10: Religious reforms by Numa: Vestals

Vestals
They had a free administration of their own affairs without guardian or tutor, which was the privilege of women who were the mothers of three children;
Plt Numa, chapter 10: Religious reforms by Numa: Vestals

Vices
There will be vices as long as there are men.
His Book IV Chapter 74: The Batavian Uprise. Speech of Cerialis (cont.)

Victory
You know, Hannibal, how to gain a victory, but not how to use it.
Plt Fabius, Chapter 17: Reaction of Hannibal and in Rome

Vulgar
Who were accustomed, as is the fashion of the vulgar, to value their emperors by the beauty and grace of their persons.
His Book I Chapter 7: Galba becomes emperor. Executions

Vulture
Hercules was always very joyful when a vulture appeared to him upon any action.
Plt Romulus, chapter 10: The Foundation of Rome (cont.)

War
Woe to the conquered.
Plt Camillus, chapter 30: The Capitol nearly surrendered.

War
Next day they sent an embassy asking mercy for the freeborn, and offering ten thousand slaves. As it would have been inhuman to slay the prisoners, and very difficult to keep them under guard, the conquerors rejected the offer, preferring that they should perish by the just doom of war. The signal for massacre was therefore given to the soldiers, who had mounted the walls by scaling ladders.
Ann Book XII Chapter 17: Problems in Bosporus (cont.)

War
Arms are blessed by heaven when there is no hope except in arms
Hor Book IX Chapter 1: War with the Samnites. Speech of Pontius.

War
To slay me is no sin.
Vrg Book X Chapter 35: Death of Mezentius

War
Woe to the vanquished!
Hor Book V Chapter 48: Invasion of the Gauls. Final Surrender of the Defenders.

War
By some strange fatality, we find the gods more propitious when we are at war than when we are at peace.
Hor Book III Chapter 19: The Terentilian Law -- Fresh Troubles.

War
When troops are stationary, as is the case in a protracted more than in an active campaign, furloughs are easily granted, more so to the men of rank however, than to the common soldiers.
Hor Book I Chapter 57: The Rape of Lucretia.

War
A war is just and right, Samnites, when it is forced upon us
Hor Book IX Chapter 1: War with the Samnites. Speech of Pontius.

War
Convinced that the vigour of the State was becoming enfeebled through inaction, he looked all round for a pretext for getting up a war.
Hor Book I Chapter 22: Tullus Hostilius and the War with Alba.

War
"It is not," he said, " plains only which are good for the fighting of Roman soldiers, but woods and forest passes if science be used. For the huge shields and unwieldly lances of the barbarians cannot, amid trunks of trees and brushwood that springs from the ground, be so well managed as our javelins and swords and closefitting armour.
Ann Book II Chapter 14: War with the Germans. An assembly.

War
This people who were at that time in possession of Ardea, were, considering the nature of their country and the age in which they lived, exceptionally wealthy. This circumstance really originated the war, for the Roman king was anxious to repair his own fortune, which had been exhausted by the magnificent scale of his public works and also to conciliate his subjects by a distribution of the spoils of war.
Hor Book I Chapter 57: The Rape of Lucretia.

Water
Whoever slakes his thirst at Clitor's fountain, shuns wine,
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 8: 307-360 Pythagoras' Teachings:Physical changes

Water
The Cicones have a river, whose waters when drunk turn the vital organs to stone, and that change things to marble when touched.
Ovd Ovid XV Chapter 8: 307-360 Pythagoras' Teachings:Physical changes

Water
Although there are some, indeed, who deny that there are reservoirs of water lying ready provided out of sight, in the places from whence springs flow, and that when they appear, they merely issue and run out; on the contrary, they say, they are then formed and come into existence for the first time, by the liquefaction of the surrounding matter; and that this change is caused by density and cold, when the moist vapor, by being closely pressed together, becomes fluid.
Plt Aemilius Chapter 13: Water problems for Aemilius

Wine
Thou shalt not make libation to the gods of wine from an unpruned vine.
Plt Numa, chapter 14: Dialogue with Jupiter

Wine
What, pray, would have happened if his love of wine had become stronger and his passionate nature more violent and fiery as he grew older?
Hor Book IX Chapter 18: Comparison continued.

Winter-quarters
They, the tribunes, had not been blind to the fact that this gift from their adversaries would prove to be tainted with poison. The liberties of the plebs had been bartered away, their able-bodied men had been permanently sent away, banished from the City and the State, without any regard to winter or indeed to any season of the year, or to the possibility of their visiting their homes or looking after their property. [gift: pay of soldiers]
Hor Book V Chapter 2: War in the winter. Speech of Appius Claudius.

Wisdom
22 The Greeks seek after wisdom
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 1

Wisdom
19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 3

Wisdom
The desire of glory is the last infirmity cast off even by the wise.
His Book IV Chapter 6: Death of Thrasea Paetus

Wisdom
Diogenes, who, being told that some persons derided him, made answer, "But I am not derided," meaning that only those were really insulted on whom such insults made an impression.
Plt Fabius, Chapter 10: The army is divided

Wisdom
It is a fact that in the moment of terror the counsels of the wise and the voice of the rabble are listened to with equal respect.
His Book III Chapter 58: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Rome is enrolled

Wisdom
19 I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and will bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 1

Wisdom
19 Wisdom is justified of her children.
Nwt Gospel of Matthew Chapter 11.

Wives
22 Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Ephesians Chapter 5

Wives
18 Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands,
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Colossians Chapter 3

Wives
33 ...let every one of you in particular so love his wife even as himself;
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Ephesians Chapter 5

Wives
Husbands have often been corrupted by the vices of their wives
Ann Book III Chapter 34: Wifes and campaigning (Cont.)

Women
There must be a limit to the honours paid to women
Ann Book I Chapter 14: The start of Tiberius(cont.)

Women
Not only is the sex feeble and unequal to hardship, but, when it has liberty, it is spiteful, intriguing and greedy of power
Ann Book III Chapter 33: Wifes and campaigning

Women
A law however was passed that the priestess, in regard to her sacred functions, was to be under the husband's control, but in other respects to retain the ordinary legal position of women.
Ann Book IV Chapter 16: Appointment of a priest

Women
4 That they may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husband, to love their children, 5 To be discreet, chaste, keepers at home, good, obedient to their own husbands
Nwt Letter of Paul to Titus Chapter 2

Women
Here the sovereignty is exercised by a woman. So notoriously do they degenerate not only from a state of liberty, but even below a state of bondage.
Ger Chapter 46: Further East

Women
7 For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God: but the woman is the glory of the man.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians Chapter 11

Women
2 The head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man;
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians Chapter 11

Women
32 He that is unmarried careth for the things that belong to the Lord, how he may please the Lord: But he that is married careth for the things that are of the world, how he may please his wife.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 7

Women
9 It is better to marry than to burn
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 7

Women
1 It is good for a man not to touch a woman.
Nwt First letter of Paul to the Corinthians. Chapter 7

Wrath
26 Be ye angry, and sin not: let not the sun go down upon your wrath
Nwt Letter of Paul to the Ephesians Chapter 4

Writing
In their dependence on writing, they relax their diligence in learning thoroughly, and their employment of the memory
Dbg Book VI Chapter 14: The Gauls: the Druids(cont.)

Yew-tree
Cativolcus destroyed himself with the juice of the yew-tree
Dbg Book VI Chapter 31: Revolt of the Gauls. Ambiorix gives up.