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Quote of the day: It had been the ancient policy of the fo
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Annals by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book I Chapter 40: Revolt in Germania. Agrippina leaves the camp[AD 14]
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Amid the alarm all condemned Germanicus for not going to the Upper Army, where he might find obedience and help against the rebels. Enough and more than enough blunders, they said, had been made by granting discharges and money, indeed, by conciliatory measures. Even if Germanicus held his own life cheap, why should he keep a little son [Note 1] and a pregnant wife [Note 2] among madmen who outraged every human right? Let these, at least, be restored safely to their grandsire and to the State. When his wife spurned the notion, protesting that she was a descendant of the Divine Augustus and could face peril with no degenerate spirit, he at last embraced her and the son of their love with many tears, and after long delay compelled her to depart. Slowly moved along a pitiable procession of women, a general's fugitive wife with a little son in her bosom, her friends' wives weeping round her, as with her they were dragging themselves from the camp. Not less sorrowful were those who remained.

Note 1: son = Caligula
Note 2: wife = Agrippina

Event: Revolt in Germania