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Quote of the day: The dark complexion of the Silures, thei
Notes
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Annals by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book I Chapter 67: War with the Germans. Speech of Caecina[AD 15]
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Having then assembled them at his head-quarters, and ordered them to hear his words in silence, he [Note 1] reminded them of the urgency of the crisis. Their safety, he said, lay in their arms, which they must, however, use with discretion, and they must remain within the entrenchments, till the enemy approached closer, in the hope of storming them; then, there must be a general sortie by that sortie the Rhine might be reached. Whereas if they fled, more forests, deeper swamps, and a savage foe awaited them; but if they were victorious, glory and renown would be theirs. He dwelt on all that was dear to them at home, all that testified to their honour in the camp, without any allusion to disaster. Next he handed over the horses, beginning with his own, of the officers and tribunes, to the bravest fighters in the army, quite impartially, that these first, and then the infantry, might charge the enemy.

Note 1: Caecina

Event: War with the Germans