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Quote of the day: As nothing could unite them into one pol
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Annals by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book III Chapter 72: Restorations[AD 22]
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About the same time Lepidus asked the Senate's leave to restore and embellish, at his own expense, the Basilica of Paulus, that monument of the Aemilian family. Public-spirited munificence was still in fashion, and Augustus had not hindered Taurus, Philippus, or Balbus from applying the spoils of war or their superfluous wealth to adorn the capital and to win the admiration of posterity. Following these examples, Lepidus, though possessed of a moderate fortune, now revived the glory of his ancestors. The theatre of Pompey, which had been destroyed by an accidental fire, the emperor [Note 1] promised to rebuild, simply because no member of the family was equal to restoring it, but Pompeius's name was to be retained. At the same time he highly extolled Sejanus on the ground that it was through his exertions and vigilance that such fury of the flames had been confined to the destruction of a single building. The Senate voted Sejanus a statue, which was to be placed in Pompeius's theatre. And soon afterwards the emperor in honouring Junius Blaesus proconsul of Africa with triumphal distinctions, said that he granted them as a compliment to Sejanus, whose uncle Blaesus was.

Note 1: emperor = Tiberius