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Quote of the day: As nothing could unite them into one pol
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Annals by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book XI Chapter 15: On haruspices[AD 47]
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Claudius then brought before the Senate the subject of the college of haruspices, that, as he said, the oldest of Italian sciences might not be lost through negligence. It had often happened in evil days for the State that advisers had been summoned at whose suggestion ceremonies had been restored and observed more duly for the future. The nobles of Etruria, whether of their own accord or at the instigation of the Roman Senate, had retained this science, making it the inheritance of distinct families. It was now less zealously studied through the general indifference to all sound learning and to the growth of foreign superstitions. At present all is well, but we must show gratitude to the favour of Heaven, by taking care that the rites observed during times of peril may not be forgotten in prosperity. A resolution of the Senate was accordingly passed, charging the pontiffs to see what should be retained or reformed with respect to the haruspices.