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The Gallic War (De Bello Gallico) by Julius Caesar
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book V Chapter 24: The army in Gaul.[54 BC]
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The ships having been drawn up and a general assembly of the Gauls held at Samarobriva, because the corn that year had not prospered in Gaul by reason of the droughts, he was compelled to station his army in its winter-quarters differently from the former years, and to distribute the legions among several states: one of them he gave to Gaius Fabius, his lieutenant, to be marched into the territories of the Morini; a second to Quintus Cicero, into those of the Nervii; a third to Lucius Roscius, into those of the Essui; a fourth he ordered to winter with Titus Labienus among the Remi in the confines of the Treviri; he stationed three in Belgium; over these he appointed Marcus Crassus, his questor, and Lucius Munatius Plancus and Gaius Trebonius, his lieutenants. One legion which he had raised last on the other side of the Po, and five cohorts, he sent among the Eburones, the greatest portion of whom lie between the Meuse and the Rhine, [and] who were under the government of Ambiorix and Cativolcus. He ordered Quintus Titurius Sabinus and Lucius Aurunculeius Cotta, his lieutenants, to take command of these soldiers. The legions being distributed in this manner, he thought he could most easily remedy the scarcity of corn and yet the winter-quarters of all these legions (except that which he had given to Lucius Roscius, to be led into the most peaceful and tranquil neighborhood) were comprehended within [about] 100 miles. He himself in the mean while, until he had stationed the legions and knew that the several winter-quarters were fortified, determined to stay in Gaul.