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Quote of the day: His entry into the capital, made after t
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The Gallic War (De Bello Gallico) by Julius Caesar
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book VI Chapter 44: Revolt of the Gauls. Peace in Gaul.[53 BC]
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Having devastated the country in such a manner, Caesar leads back his army with the loss of two cohorts to Durocortorum, of the Remi, and, having summoned a Council of Gaul to assemble at that place, he resolved to hold an investigation respecting the conspiracy of the Senones and Carnutes, and having pronounced a most severe sentence upon Acco, who had been the contriver of that plot, he punished him after the custom of our ancestors. Some fearing a trial, fled; when he had forbidden these fire and water, he stationed in winter-quarters two legions at the frontiers of the Treviri, two among the Lingones, the remaining six at Agendicum, in the territories of the Senones; and, having provided corn for the army, he set out for Italy, as he had determined, to hold the assizes.

Event: Revolt of the Gauls