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Quote of the day: The more common report is that Remus con
Notes
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Historiae by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book II Chapter 89: Revolt of Vespasian. Vitellius enters Rome[AD 69]
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Vitellius himself, mounted on a splendid charger, with military cloak and sword, advanced from the Mulvian Bridge, driving the Senate and people before him; but deterred by the advice of his friends from marching into Rome as if it were a captured city, he assumed a civil garb, and proceeded with his army in orderly array. The eagles of four legions were borne in front, and an equal number of colours from other legions on either side, then came the standards of twelve auxiliary squadrons, and the cavalry behind the ranks of the infantry. Next came thirty-four auxiliary cohorts, distinguished according to the names or various equipments of the nations. Before each eagle were the prefects of the camp, the tribunes, and the centurions of highest rank, in white robes, and the other officers by the side of their respective companies, glittering with arms and decorations. The ornaments and chains of the soldiers presented a brilliant appearance. It was a glorious sight, and the army was worthy of a better emperor than Vitellius. Thus he entered the capital, and he there embraced his mother [Note 1] and honoured her with the title of Augusta.

Note 1: mother = Sextilia

Event: Revolt of Vespasian