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Quote of the day: Civilis had also thrown a dam obliquely
Notes
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Historiae by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book III Chapter 37: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus. Reaction in the Senate[AD 69]
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He then addressed the Senate in a speech of studied grandiloquence, and was extolled by the senators with elaborate adulation. A savage resolution against Caecina was moved by Lucius Vitellius; the rest affected indignation at the idea that a consul had betrayed the State, a general his Emperor, a man loaded with wealth so vast and honours so numerous his benefactor, and seemed to deplore the wrongs of Vitellius, while they uttered their private griefs. Not a word from any one of them disparaged the Flavianist leaders; they censured the delusion and recklessness of the armies, and with a prudent circumlocution avoided the name of Vespasian. A man was found, who, while all regarded with great contempt both giver and receiver, wormed himself by flattery into the one day of office which remained to complete the consulate of Caecina. On the last day of October Rosius Regulus both assumed and resigned the office. The learned remarked that never before had a new consul been elected without a formal act of deprivation and the passing of a law. Before this indeed Caninius Rebilus had been consul for a single day during the dictatorship of Gaius Caesar, when the prizes of the civil war had to be enjoyed in haste.

Event: Vitellius versus Antonius Primus