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Quote of the day: He had assumed such a new character that
Notes
Parallel Lives by Plutarchus

Lucullus Chapter 4: Lucullus collects money for Sulla[84-80 BC]
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After this he came to Sulla, in Chersonesus, as he was preparing to pass the strait, and brought timely assistance for the safe transportation of the army. Peace being presently made, Mithridates sailed off to the Euxine sea, but Sulla taxed the inhabitants of Asia twenty thousand talents, and ordered Lucullus to gather and coin the money. And it was no small comfort to the cities under Sulla's severity, that a man of not only incorrupt and just behavior, but also of moderation, should be employed in so heavy and odious an office. The Mitylenaeans, who absolutely revolted, he was willing should return to their duty, and submit to a moderate penalty for the offense they had given in the case of Marius. But, finding them bent upon their own destruction, he came up to them, defeated them at sea, blocked them up in their city and besieged them; then sailing off from them openly in the day to Elaea, he returned privately, and posting an ambush near the city, lay quiet himself: And on the Mitylenaeans coming out eagerly and in disorder to plunder the deserted camp, he fell upon them, took many of them, and slew five hundred, who stood upon their defense. He gained six thousand slaves, and a very rich booty. He was no way engaged in the great and general troubles of Italy which Sulla and Marius created, a happy providence at that time detaining him in Asia upon business. He was as much in Sulla's favor, however, as any of his other friends; Sulla, as was said before, dedicated his Memoirs to him as a token of kindness, and at his death, passing by Pompey, made him guardian to his son; which seems, indeed, to have been the rise of the quarrel and jealousy between them two being both young men, and passionate for honor.