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Quote of the day: Caecina revelled more freely in plunder
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Twelve Emperors by Suetonius

Augustus, Chapter 64: His grandchildren.
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He [Note 1] had three grandsons by Agrippa and Julia, namely, Gaius, Lucius and Agrippa and two grand-daughters, Julia and Agrippina. Julia he married to Lucius Paulus, the censor's son, and Agrippina to Germanicus, his sister's grandson. Gaius and Lucius he adopted at home, by the ceremony of purchase from their father, advanced them, while yet very young, to offices in the state, and when they were consuls-elect, sent them to visit the provinces and armies. In bringing up his daughter and granddaughters, he accustomed them to domestic employments and even spinning, and obliged them to speak and act every thing openly before the family, that it might be put down in the diary. He so strictly prohibited them from all converse with strangers, that he once wrote a letter to Lucius Vinicius, a handsome young man of a good family, in which he told him, You have not behaved very modestly, in making a visit to my daughter at Baie. He usually instructed his grandsons himself in reading, swimming, and other rudiments of knowledge; and he laboured nothing more than to perfect them in the imitation of his hand-writing. He never supped but he had them sitting at the foot of his couch; nor ever travelled but with them in a chariot before him, or riding beside him.

Note 1: he = Augustus