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Quote of the day: Appius Claudius was keenly alive to the
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Twelve Emperors by Suetonius

Augustus, Chapter 82: Other habits.
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In the winter, he [Note 1] was protected against the inclemency of the weather by a thick toga, four tunics, a shirt, a flannel stomacher, and swathings upon his legs and thighs. In summer, he lay with the doors of his bedchamber open, and frequently in a piazza, refreshed by a bubbling fountain, and a person standing by to fan him. He could not bear even the winter's sun; and at home, never walked in the open air without a broad-brimmed hat on his head. He usually travelled in a litter, and by night; and so slow, that he was two days in going to Praeneste or Tibur. And if he could go to any place by sea, he preferred that mode of travelling. He carefully nourished his health against his many infirmities, avoiding chiefly the free use of the bath; but he was often rubbed with oil, and sweated in a stove after which he was washed with tepid water, warmed either by a fire, or by being exposed to the heat of the sun. When, upon account of his nerves, he was obliged to have recourse to seawater, or the waters of Albula, he was contented with sitting over a wooden tub, which he called by a Spanish name dureta, and plunging his hands and feet in the water by turns.

Note 1: he = Augustus