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Quote of the day: Fabius was looked upon as more inclined
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Twelve Emperors by Suetonius

Caligula, Chapter 45: Military affairs of Caligula (Cont.)
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Presently, finding no one to fight with, he had a few Germans of his body-guard taken across the river and concealed there, and word brought him after luncheon with great bustle and confusion that the enemy were close at hand. Upon this he rushed out with his friends and a part of the praetorian cavalry to the woods close by, and after cutting the branches from some trees and adorning them like trophies, he returned by torchlight, taunting those who had not followed him as timorous and cowardly, and presenting his companions and the partners in his victory with crowns of a new kind and of a new name, ornamented with figures of the sun, moon and stars, and called exploratoriae. Another time some hostages were taken from a common school and secretly sent on ahead of him, when he suddenly left a banquet and pursued them with the cavalry as if they were runaways, caught them, and brought them back in fetters, in this farce too showing immoderate extravagance. On coming back to the table, when some announced that the army was assembled, he urged them to take their places just as they were, in their coats of mail. He also admonished them in the familiar line of Vergil to bear up and save themselves for better days. Meanwhile he rebuked the absent senate and people in a stern edict because while Caesar was fighting and exposed to such dangers they were indulging in revels and frequenting the theatres and their pleasant villas.

Event: Military affairs of Caligula