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Quote of the day: Vitellius, on the contrary, was sunk in
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Twelve Emperors by Suetonius

Julius Caesar, Chapter 6: Julius Caesar quastor in Spain
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When quaestor [67 B.C.], he [Note 1] pronounced the customary orations from the rostra in praise of his aunt Julia and his wife Cornelia, who had both died. And in the eulogy of his aunt he spoke in the following terms of her paternal and maternal ancestry and that of his own father: The family of my aunt Julia is descended by her mother from the kings, and on her father's side is akin to the immortal Gods for the Marcii Reges (her mother's family name) go back to Ancus Marcius, and the Julii, the family of which ours is a branch, to Venus. Our stock therefore has at once the sanctity of kings, whose power is supreme among mortal men, and the claim to reverence which attaches to the Gods, who hold sway over kings themselves. In place of Cornelia he took to wife Pompeia, daughter of Quintus Pompeius and grand-daughter of Lucius Sulla. But he afterward divorced her [62 B.C.], suspecting her of adultery with Publius Clodius; and in fact the report that Clodius had gained access to her in woman's garb during a public religious ceremony was so persistent, that the senate decreed that the pollution of the sacred rites be judicially investigated.

Note 1: he = Julius Caesar

Event: Julius Caesar quastor in Spain