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Quote of the day: He called into his service twelve lictor
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Twelve Emperors by Suetonius

Julius Caesar, Chapter 31: Preliminaries to the civil war.[49 BC]
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Accordingly, when word came that the veto of the tribunes had been set aside and they themselves had left the city, he [Note 1] at once sent on a few cohorts with all secrecy, and then, to disarm suspicion, concealed his purpose by appearing at a public show, inspecting the plans of a gladiatorial school which he intended building, and joining as usual in a banquet with a large company. It was not until after sunset that he set out very privily with a small company, taking the mules from a bakeshop hard by and harnessing them to a carriage; and when his lights went out and he lost his way, he was astray for some time, but at last found a guide at dawn and got back to the road on foot by narrow bypaths. Then, overtaking his cohorts at the river Rubicon, which was the boundary of his province, he paused for a while, and realizing what a step he was taking, he turned to those about him and said: 'Even yet we may draw back; but once cross yon little bridge, and the whole issue is with the sword.

Note 1: he = Julius Caesar

Event: Julius Caesar crosses the Rubicon