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Quote of the day: He called into his service twelve lictor
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Twelve Emperors by Suetonius

Tiberius Chapter 35: Tiberius and public morality.
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He [Note 1] revived the custom of our forefathers, that in the absence of a public prosecutor matrons of ill-repute be punished according to the decision of a Council of their relatives. He absolved a Roman knight from his oath and allowed him to put away his wife, who was taken in adultery with her son-in-law, even though he had previously sworn that he would never divorce her. Notorious women had begun to make an open profession of prostitution, to avoid the punishment of the laws by giving up the privileges and rank of matrons, while the most profligate young men of both orders voluntarily incurred degradation from their rank, so as not to be prevented by the decree of the Senate from appearing on the stage and in the arena. All such men and women he punished with exile, to prevent anyone from shielding himself by such a device. He deprived a senator of his broad stripe on learning that he had moved to his gardens just before the Kalends of July[the first of July was the date for renting and hiring houses and rooms -- hence moving day], with the design of renting a house in the city at a lower figure after that date. He deposed another from his quaestorship, because he had taken a wife the day before casting lots [to determine his province or sphere of duty] and divorced her the day after.

Note 1: Tiberius