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Quote of the day: The Britons themselves bear cheerfully t
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Annals by Tacitus
Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb
Book II Chapter 11: War with the Germans. The Cherusci.[AD 16]
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Next day the German army took up its position on the other side of the Visurgis. Caesar [Note 1], thinking that without bridges and troops to guard them, it would not be good generalship to expose the legions to danger, sent the cavalry across the river by the fords. It was commanded by Stertinius and Aemilius, one of the first rank centurions who attacked at widely different points so as to distract the enemy. Chariovalda, the Batavian chief dashed to the charge where the stream is most rapid. The Cherusci, by a pretended flight, drew him into a plain surrounded by forest-passes. Then bursting on him in a sudden attack from all points they thrust aside all who resisted, pressed fiercely on their retreat, driving them before them, when they rallied in compact array, some by close fighting, others by missiles from a distance. Chariovalda, after long sustaining the enemy's fury, cheered on his men to break by a dense formation the onset of their bands, while he himself, plunging into the thickest of the battle, fell amid a shower of darts with his horse pierced under him, and round him many noble chiefs. The rest were rescued from the peril by their own strength, or by the cavalry which came up with Stertinius and Aemilius.

Note 1: Caesar = Germanicus

Event: War with the Germans



Notes:
Horse:a. the animal. b. cavalry.