In his youth he had cultivated with many intrigues the friendship of the great.
His Book I Chapter 10: Galba becomes emperor. The East

He was a compound of dissipation and energy, of arrogance and courtesy, of good and bad qualities. His self-indulgence was excessive, when he had leisure, yet whenever he had served, he had shown great qualities. In his public capacity he might be praised; his private life was in bad repute. Yet over subjects, friends, and colleagues, he exercised the influence of many fascinations.
His Book I Chapter 10: Galba becomes emperor. The East

Mucianus, on the contrary, was eminent for his magnificence, for his wealth, and for a greatness that transcended in all respects the condition of a subject; readier of speech than the other, he thoroughly understood the arrangement and direction of civil business.
His Book II Chapter 5: Titus returns (cont.)

Mucianus, with the perpetual assertion that money was the sinews of war,
His Book II Chapter 84: Revolt of Vespasian. Money